Colloquia & Seminars

Colloquia & seminar talks are scheduled from 1:30pm - 2:45pm on Thursday each week, unless otherwise noted. Speakers give 50-minute presentations on various mathematical and statistical topics.

If you would like to meet with a speaker, please contact math@unr.edu to schedule a meeting. To receive email announcements about future talks and events, please subscribe to our email list! Simply send an email to sympa@lists.unr.edu with a blank subject line and the main body text 'subscribe mathstat-announce EmailAddress FirstName LastName'.

We look forward to your participation in our upcoming colloquia!

Colloquia and Seminar Talks Schedule
DateSpeakerInstitutionTitleRoom
Nov 9 Dr. Bruce Blackadar UNR Classification of Simple C*-Algebras
Click for Abstract...

The theorem giving a complete classification up to isomorphism of a large and natural class of simple C*-algebras, completed in 2016, is one of the best and most significant recent results in all of mathematics, and deserves to be better known. It is the culmination of a project of more than 30 years by dozens of mathematicians, and its roots go back more than 50 years. My goal in this talk is to explain what the classification theorem says, why it is important, and outline the complicated and convoluted path to the proof. Most of the talk should be accessible to graduate students and even largely to advanced undergraduates.

AB 634
Nov 16 Dr. Weiwei Pan Harvard Machine Learning for Real-World Usability: Challenges and Solutions
Click for Abstract...

The ubiquity of data and the remarkable predictive capabilities of increasingly complex state-of-the-art machine learning models promise to bring the benefit of individualized and intelligent automation to many aspects of modern life. As models begin to impact or even replace human decision makers in situations of consequence, there are some basic and intuitive metrics for evaluating the performance of models operating in the wild that are nonetheless not currently included in the standard array of performance measures optimized during model building. These common-sensical questions might include: how do we know that a model that has performed well in one environment will do well in another? How well does the model perform when integrated into working teams that include humans? How can we ensure that models make decisions that are fair and or lawful? In this talk, we will survey the major challenges for designing systems that are reliable in the wild, we will also describe current work addressing these open questions.

AB 634
Nov 30 Dr. Curtis Pro California State University, Stanislaus Riemannian Geometry with a lower sectional curvature bound
Click for Abstract...

The "Recognition Problem" in Riemannian Geometry asks to "detect" or "give a description" of Riemannian manifolds given that certain measurements of their metric invariants satisfy some conditions. By itself, the class of Riemannian manifolds that have a lower sectional curvature bound is very rich. However, as we add more metric restrictions to this class we can quickly begin to give answers to the Recognition Problem. In this talk I'll give a survey of old and new results in this direction.

AB 634
Dec 7 Dr. Javier Morales Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon From the Atom to the Industry
Click for Abstract...

In this presentation we will describe the role of education and science in the industrial panorama of Mexico. We will explain how the Mexican government motivates universities to engage in industrial projects, and mention examples of successful university-industry collaborations. We present selected scientific projects done in collaboration with industry and researches from other universities. In particular, we will focus on diamond growth and its applications.

AB 634