WiSE: Women in Science & Engineering

An all-female community of support at the College of Science.

Apply to WiSE

The Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) Living Learning Community (LLC) is focused on building community among women who are pursuing degrees in science, math, and engineering programs. As incoming freshmen, all members of the WiSE LLC cohort will live together on the same floor of the Great Basin Residence Hall.

Premium housing

Premium student housing placement in the newest University residence hall: Great Basin.

Community

Build a strong sense of community and support in science, engineering and mathematics degree programs.

Professional development

Network with professional women who are well-established in their careers, often WiSE graduates themselves!

What you need to know before you apply

WiSE news

News, blog posts, and features about the WiSE LLC and our students

de Bettencourt-Dias wears a black shirt with a necklace and smiles in front of a gray background.
Ana de Bettencourt-Dias named Foundation Professor

de Bettencourt-Dias has a lengthy list of contributions to her field, as well as invaluable service to the University and its students.

Two women and a man stand, with the woman in the middle and the man holding plaques. They stand in front of a screen that says "College of Science" on the top line and "Live a life of discovery" on the bottom line in italics. The Nevada Block N is above the words.
Linda Hayes recognized with Distinguished Faculty Award

The psychology professor, who has worked at the University for 32 years, received the award in her final year before retirement.

Melissa Harmon smiles, wearing a blue top under a black blazer.
Paving the Wolf Pack Way: Melissa Harmon

Paving the Wolf Pack Way is a series of stories showcasing Wolf Pack Way alumni from the College of Science.

Kizzmekia Corbett, Christopher Sanchez and Melanie Duckworth in a collage with the Discover Science podcast identifier.
Discover Science podcast: Kizzmekia Corbett on going where you are loved

Scientific Lead in the development of the COVID-19 mRNA vaccine discusses her research and work, the importance of good mentorship, and finding her place in science.

team ready to release stingray
Recent expedition and monster fish rescue highlight Mekong River's global significance

Deep pools in Mekong River may be home to world's largest freshwater fish

Nine women in white lab coats smile for a photo on the green University quad.
NSHE Regents' Mid-Career Researcher Award goes to dedicated biologist

Jamie Voyles will be celebrated with her colleagues at the University's Honor the Best event

Elizabeth Pringle smiles, wearing a blue shirt.
NSF CAREER Award recipient studies how plants respond to drought

Elizabeth Pringle will study how plant chemistry changes in response to drought in the Great Basin.

Bradon posing with his mentor, Ben
Undergraduate researchers prepare for Wolf Pack Discoveries

Faculty mentors and student awardees provide insight to the rewarding experience of University-supported research, scholarly and creative activities

Students clockwise from top left are: Nayeli Stopani Barrios, Jessica Becker and Larissa Sanches
The challenge of gender bias: experiences of women pursuing careers in STEM

A look at the difficulties and biases women in STEM careers face written by the freshmen Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) LLC cohort on the topic of women in STEM

Clockwise from top left: Kalia Johnson, Delaney Lewis, Isabella LoConte, Jacquelin Merino Rojas
Rosalind Franklin’s discovery of the double helix

A look at this pioneering scientist's life written by the freshmen Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) LLC cohort on the topic of women in STEM

Two students wearing lab coats and goggles on their foreheads stand talking in front of a wooden door.
Curiosity wins at the College of Science

The annual competition selected the top three videos, along with two honorable mentions and a most-engaged watch party to win prizes.

WISE blog students
Gender discrepancies in STEM

To make STEM fields more successful, look at adding to, rather than limiting, what women and members of minority groups are doing

The Artemis spacecraft in a NASA hanger next to a sign that reads "To the moon and beyond"
The Artemis Program: Women going to the moon

Read the second of six blogs written by the freshmen Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) LLC cohort on the topic of women in STEM to be shared throughout the 2021-22 academic year.

: Alejandra Ibarra, Alicia Chiang, Brooke McManus, and Bea Natalia Tan
Growing up as a woman in STEM

Read the first of six blogs written by the freshmen Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) LLC cohort on the topic of women in STEM to be shared throughout this academic year. The blogs are part of an assignment in the WiSE LLC SCI 110 course.

Three students in the WiSE program sitting on couches in the dorm studying
WiSE WOMEN

Providing support and inspiration for female scientists and engineers at the University of Nevada, Reno.

Elizabeth Everest dons a sun hat while on a boat in Cambodia with local Wonders of the Mekong team members.
Fulbright U.S. Scholar Award recipients pursue overseas teaching and research opportunities

Elizabeth Everest (WiSE graduate) and Connor Billman of the Department of Biology both received the prestigious award.

Funding for the WiSE program is provided by the generous support of Nevada Gold Mines.

Nevada Gold Mines logo