Master of Arts in Counseling

High-Impact Master's Education

The M.A. in Counseling is part of the Counseling and Educational Psychology program. We offer three specializations: marital, family, and couples counseling (MFCC); school counseling; and clinical mental health counseling (CMHC).

Fall Application Deadline: January 15

Accreditation Status

The University of Nevada, Reno School Counseling, Marriage and Family, Clinical Mental Health, and Ph.D. in Education: Counselor Education and Supervision programs are fully accredited by the Counsel for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) through October 31, 2024.

Counseling Program Student Outcomes

Program Objectives

  • Program Objective #1: Dispositions

    From admission through exit students will demonstrate the attitudes, characteristics, and behaviors defined by the program as characteristic of exemplar counseling professionals.

  • Program Objective #2: Ethical Practice

    Students will demonstrate the capacity to practice counseling from a strong foundational understanding of ethical and legal issues, intentionally integrating counseling ethical practices into day-to-day professional activities.

  • Program Objective #3: Social and Cultural Diversity

    In keeping with the ACA multicultural competencies, students will develop self-awareness, knowledge, and skills to prepare them to be contemporary, relevant, and culturally informed practitioners in clinical, marriage and family, and school counseling settings.

  • Program Objective #4: Human Growth and Development

    Students will demonstrate knowledge of lifespan development and the capacity to integrate knowledge of developmental theory into practice.

  • Program Objective #5: Career Development

    Students will demonstrate competence in understanding the world of work and the relationship between mental health and life roles such as work, school, and home.

  • Program Objective #6: Counseling and Helping Relationships

    Students will gain an understanding of the theories and research related to helping relationships, and will develop the skills to apply their knowledge in professional, therapeutic relationships.

  • Program Objective #7: Group Counseling and Group Work

    Students will demonstrate knowledge of group process dynamics, group counseling, and group work, including group theories, stages of group, leadership styles, and therapeutic factors.

  • Program Objective #8: Assessment and Testing

    Students will demonstrate a broad understanding of validity and reliability of assessments, the selection and use of assessment tools, client assessment and diagnosis, trauma assessment, and the assessment of self-inflicted harm and danger to others.

  • Program Objective #9: Research and Program Evaluation

    Counseling students will demonstrate the capacity to select, analyze, and apply research to inform practice, including evidence-based practices and theory based interventions appropriate to their designated setting and personal theoretical orientation.

  • Program Objective #10: Clinical Mental Health Counseling

    Clinical Mental Health Counseling students will demonstrate an understanding of foundational knowledge (such as psychological testing), contextual factors (such as trauma, co-occurring disorders, poverty, and culture), and the demonstration of competence in clinical mental health field work.

  • Program Objective #11: Marriage, Couple and Family Counseling

    Marriage, Couple and Family counseling students will demonstrate an understanding of foundational knowledge (such as family systems theory and assessment), contextual factors (such as trauma, intergenerational influences, and culture), and the demonstration of competence in the practice of marriage, couple, and family counseling.

  • Program Objective #12: School Counseling

    School counseling students will demonstrate an understanding of foundational knowledge (such as models of school program development and school assessment), contextual dimensions (such as the roles of school counselors, signs of substance abuse, and effective school leadership), and the demonstration of competence in the practice of school counseling.

Program Faculty

Counseling and Educational Psychology
Lily Chen
Lily Chen, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Counseling and Educational Psychology
(775) 682-5508
WRB 3038
1421
Counseling and Educational Psychology College of Education, University of Nevada Reno, ounseling
Ken Coll
Ken Coll, Ph.D.
Professor of Counseling and Acting Dean (School of Social Work)
(775) 682-7873
WRB 3039
1421 College of Education, University of Nevada Reno, ounseling
Counseling and Educational Psychology
Brenda Freeman
Brenda Freeman, Ph.D.
Professor of Counselor Education
(775) 682-9353
WRB 3019
1421
Counseling and Educational Psychology
Thomas Harrison
Thomas Harrison, Ph.D.
Professor of Counseling
(775) 682-7318
WRB 3040
1421
Counseling and Educational Psychology
Leping Liu
Leping Liu, Ph.D.
Professor of Counseling and Educational Psychology
(775) 682-5511
WRB 3041
1421
Counseling and Educational Psychology
Mona Martinez
Mona Martinez, Ph.D.
Downing Counseling Clinic Director
(775)784-6637
WRB
1421
Counseling and Educational Psychology
Linda Starr
Linda Starr
Admin Assistant III, Counseling and Educational Psychology/Human Development and Family Studies
(775) 682-5517
WRB 3045
1421
Counseling and Educational Psychology
Tricia Woodliff
Tricia Woodliff, Ph.D., CPC, NCC
Assistant Professor of Counseling and Educational Psychology
(775) 682-7873
WRB 3039
1421