Master of Social Work student handbook

Please note: this represents the program handbook for the current academic year only. For an archived version of a previous year's handbook, please contact the program directors

 

UNR

The University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) is one of eight institutions within the Nevada System of Higher Education. The University system was established in 1864, the year of the state’s admission into the Union, but because of the state’s small population, it wasn’t able to offer courses until ten years later. The first classes were offered by the University in 1874 in Elko as one of the rare preparatory schools in the intermountain region. In 1885, the University was moved to Reno to be near the center of the state’s population. It has flourished since its first year of formal college-level study in 1887.

A constitutionally established land grant university, UNR emphasizes those programs and activities that best serve the needs of the state, region, and nation. UNR seeks to provide broad access to higher education irrespective of wealth or social status; to educate the professional cadres of an industrial, increasingly urban society; and to strengthen democracy by assuring the welfare and social status of all.

Approximately 21,000 students currently attend UNR. While the majority of students are undergraduates, the University has a sizable graduate student population of approximately 3,100. Students come from all over the state of Nevada to attend UNR. Additionally, UNR’s reputation attracts many students from throughout the United States and the world.
UNR offers 80 bachelor degree programs, 69 master degree programs, 43 doctoral degree programs, and boasts 9 major academic units. UNR is accredited by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges.

UNR’s School of Social Work is housed within the Division of Health Sciences (DHS).
The University of Nevada, Reno is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, creed, national origin, veteran status, physical or mental disability, or sexual orientation in any program or activity it operates.

 

School of Social Work: Masters of Social Work program

The University of Nevada, Reno is excited to offer two modalities of the master’s degree in social work: on campus and online. Our program offers a 60 credit program for non- BSW Students seeking a masters in social work and a 30 credit program for students with a BSW degree from an accredited school. Our social work programs are accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). Our MSW program is solely structured around advanced generalist practice (AGP), which prepares social workers to handle ambiguity, work independently and demonstrate the leadership skills necessary to address the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

 

Campus and surrounding area

The University is an integral part of the thriving Reno-Sparks metropolitan area. The 290-acre campus of rolling hills features a blend of ivy-covered buildings, sweeping lawns, and functional, progressive architecture. The campus is located less than one mile from downtown Reno, and offers a spectacular view of the surrounding community and nearby mountains.

Reno is situated prominently in an attractive natural setting. Bounded on the west by the majestic Sierra Nevada range and on the east by the rolling basin range, Reno benefits from a comfortable climate. Marked by generally cool and dry weather, the area is a haven for those who love the four seasons. The area provides endless opportunities for outdoor recreational activities, including skiing, hiking, boating, fishing, camping, kayaking, and biking. Additionally, the area attracts nationally renowned performers and offers several museums.

Campus resources

This listing is a sample of resources available to students at UNR.

Counseling services
Counseling Services offers individual, couple, group psychotherapy services to UNR students. The counseling staff is comprised of licensed psychologists and licensed clinical social workers, along with a select group of advanced graduate students in clinical psychology or social work programs, who are under the supervision of the licensed staff. The staff is experienced in working with a wide range of issues, such as depression, stress, anxiety, eating disorders, sexual identity, interpersonal and relationship concerns.

Appointments for initial intake sessions are made by calling (775) 784-4648. Services are confidential and comply with federal and state law, along with professional ethical codes. There is no charge for services beyond the mandatory counseling fee paid each semester. Counseling Services is fully accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services.

*Online Students: Not all campus resources will be available to students of the online program. Please contact the resource to see if it is available to you.

Disability resource center
The DRC was created to meet the unique educational needs of Undergraduate and Graduate level students with disabilities. The staff at the DRC is available to provide these students with sensitive and individualized assistance at the student's request. The DRC is dedicated to providing a coordinated program of support services that are not furnished by other university offices or outside organizations. The DRC assists students in negotiating disability related barriers and strives to improve access and opportunity. This enables all levels of students with disabilities to become integrated into campus life, and become more successful undergraduate or graduate students while maximizing their independence. Their services are free of charge. (From the DRC website) 775-784-6000 (TTD: 327-5131)

Financial aid and scholarships
The Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarship Services administers federal, State and institutional grants, employment, loans, and scholarships. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) should be submitted each year by February 1 for maximum consideration for all financial aid programs for the next academic year. The annual deadline for scholarships is also February 1. (Taken from the UNR Student Handbook) 775-784-4666

University libraries
Online collections of magazines, newspapers, journal articles, books, microfilms, video tapes, audio CDs and computer labs are among the many services available at the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center (MIKC) and the four science libraries. Information about library hours is available at any circulation desk, by calling 775-784-4636 or by visiting the University Libraries website. (Taken from the UNR Student Handbook) Additionally, you have a dedicated social sork librarian, Elena Azadbakht, who can assist you.

Motorist assistance program
If you accidentally lock your keys in your car, or find that the car has a dead battery, a tire is flat or that the car has no gas the Parking and Transportation Services Department will do its best to help you. There is no charge for their services. 775-784-4654

Office of International Students & Scholars
The Office of International Students & Scholars (OISS) provides the following assistance to International Students: Admission to UNR; transition into living in the United States; understanding policies, procedures, and regulation relating to visa status; understanding university policies, procedures, and resources; understanding federal laws which relate to international students; and intercultural training and understanding. (Adapted from the OISS website) 775-784-6874

Office of the Associate Vice President for Student Success Services
Student Academic Support Services offers a variety of programs to assist students to succeed academically. Tutoring Center, Counseling Services, Trio scholars, McNair Scholars, The Center For Student Cultural Diversity, Tutoring Center, Upward Bound. 775-784-6196

Resource comparison chart

Resources for MSW students Online MSW students Campus-based students
Counseling services No Yes
Disability Resource Center Yes Yes
Financial Aid and Scholarships Yes Yes
University Libraries Yes Yes
Office of International Students and Scholars Yes Yes
Writing Center Yes Yes
The Joe Crowley Student Union No Yes
E.L. Wiegand Fitness Center No Yes
Student Health Center No Yes
Mandatory Health Insurance No Yes

*Online students may be able to opt into the rest of these resources by purchasing the Campus Fee Package. Please note that this package cannot be broken out, therefore, by purchasing the whole packet, you will have access to all resources listed above. For more information, please contact cashiers office at 775-784-6915.

 

Introduction to social work

(Please note: the following information was taken from the Bureau of Labor Statistics website, publish date September 2019)

Social work is a profession for those with a strong desire to help improve people’s lives. Social workers enhance the fit between people’s needs and capabilities and the demands and resources of their environments. A variety of strategies are used to accomplish this goal. Social workers assist people in dealing with their relationships and solving personal and family problems. Social workers help clients identify their strengths and concerns, consider effective solutions, and find reliable resources. Social workers typically consult and counsel clients and link them with needed services. Often they refer clients to specialists in services such as debt counseling, eldercare, public assistance, or alcohol or drug rehabilitation. Social workers may review eligibility requirements, help fill out forms and applications, visit clients on a regular basis, and provide support during crises. Finally, social workers, through community organizing, program development, and political advocacy, strive to enhance environments to be socially and economically just for all people.

Social work demands a great deal from its practitioners. Social workers must be mature, emotionally healthy, and capable of coping with job-related stress. Social workers must be able to handle responsibility, work independently, and maintain good working relationships with clients and coworkers. Also required is a high level of skill in communication (i.e., reading, writing, and speaking). People who are conscientious, empathetic, caring, dedicated, and passionate will do well within the profession.

A bachelor’s degree in social work (BSW) is the most common minimum educational requirement to qualify for a job as a social worker and prepares graduates for generalist practice. While educational opportunities and foci are shaped by regional contexts, national accrediting standards issued by the Council on Social Work education ensure that graduates of BSW programs nationwide are competent in the same generalist practice behaviors.

At the graduate level, social work requires its practitioners to be able to address more complex issues, work autonomously while knowing when to seek consultation, and to assume leadership roles in whatever setting they practice. Social workers with an MSW are also distinguished by their ability to use evidence from practice and research to reach and support their decisions. A master’s degree in social work is a terminal practice degree.

Social workers who continue their education at the doctoral level primarily assume roles as educators, researchers, policymakers, and evaluators at universities, governmental, or private agencies.

Careers

For sheer variety, few occupations can match social work, which offers the broadest range of opportunities and settings. Social workers are found in public agencies, private businesses, hospitals, clinics, schools, nursing homes, private practices, police departments, courts, and countless other interesting workplaces.

Traditionally, social workers have been strongly represented in the following table:

Types of Service for Social Workers

Type of Service Type of Service
Aging/Gerontology Child Welfare
Family Services Homeless Services
Healthcare Mental Health
Public Welfare Schools
Disabilities Programs Corrections
Employee Assistance Private Practice
Community Organization Politics
Administration Research

Employment outlook

In 2019 there were approximately 707,400 social work jobs in the United States. About 9 out of 10 jobs were in health care and social assistance industries, as well as State and local government, primarily in departments of health and human services, mental health, social services, child welfare, housing, education, and corrections. Most private-sector jobs were in social service agencies, hospitals, nursing homes, home health agencies, and other health centers or clinics.

Overall employment of social workers is expected to increase by 11 percent during the 2018-2028 decade, faster than the average for all occupations. Especially rapid growth in job opportunities for gerontological social workers is expected due to the growing elderly population and the aging baby boom generation. Employment opportunities for mental health and substance abuse social workers are expected to grow by 19 percent over the next decade. Competition for social work jobs is stronger in cities where demand for services often is highest, training programs for social workers are prevalent, and interest in available positions is strongest. In addition, drug offenders are increasingly being sent to treatment program staffed by social workers, rather than being sent to jail. Opportunities should be good in rural areas, which often find it difficult to attract and retain qualified staff. (Bureau of Labor Statistics, September 2019).

Social work salaries

Nationally, the median salary for an entry-level social worker is $50,470 as of April 2020, depending on the type of work, experience required and geographic factors. Social workers with supervisory experience, many years of experience, and/or MSW degrees earn average salaries over $60,000 (Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook Outlook, April 2020).

Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Accreditation

The programs provided by the University of Nevada, Reno School of Social Work are accredited at the baccalaureate and master’s levels by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). This indicates to the public and to potential employers that UNR graduates meet the high professional standards established by CSWE in its Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS). Please refer to CSWE’s website for a complete list of Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. UNR’s MSW Social Work program has been accredited by CSWE since 1991.

Professional licensure

Many social service positions within Nevada and throughout the United States require a social work license. Licensure establishes and enforces professional standards for practice. Each state has its own licensing body, with distinct rules and regulations governing the issuing of licenses. Please check with your state of residence to determine your Board of Examiners rules and regulations. All applicants to the UNR Social Work Program will be provided the information for their state of residence at the time of application. You can also check for the information on lincenses requirement for your state on the School of Social Work’s website.

Nevada residents

Within Nevada, the Nevada Board of Examiners for Social Work issues social work licenses.
The state of Nevada has what is called “title protection” for social workers. This means that anyone who calls him/herself a “social worker” must be licensed. All students who graduate with a BSW or MSW are eligible to pursue licensure as a Licensed Social Worker (LSW).

Master’s prepared social workers are eligible to become a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW), which opens opportunities to work in additional settings and positions, including the Veterans Administration (VA), some child welfare positions, behavioral health, hospice, and community mental health. Some agencies such as the VA, only hire social workers who either have or are in the process of obtaining an LCSW. Significantly, the VA is the largest employer of master’s-level social workers in the nation. Social workers with an LCSW license can also practice independently rather than as an employee of an agency.

In Nevada, there is a second post-MSW license that enables social workers to practice independently. Social workers who obtain an LISW (Licensed Independent Social Worker) can provide referrals and support, but not clinical services, to clients and families. For example, a social worker with an LISW might assist clients who are caring for aging parents to improve their level of coping and well-being. Each of these licenses (LISW and LCSW) requires the completion of 3,000 supervised postgraduate social work hours and a satisfactory score on an exam.

Please visit the State of Nevada Board of Examiners for Social Workers website for additional information about social work licensure requirements in Nevada.

For information about career opportunities in social work and voluntary credentials for social workers, contact:

For a listing of accredited social work programs or to order a Directory of Colleges and Universities with Accredited Social Work Degree Programs for a nominal charge, contact:

Information on licensing requirements and testing procedures for each State may be obtained from State licensing authorities, or from:

 

School of Social Work mission

The mission of the UNR School of Social Work is to eradicate injustice and promote human dignity, health and well-being. We strive to achieve this mission through teaching, research, engagement & advocacy.

MSW program mission

The mission of the MSW program is to prepare ethical, competent advanced generalist social work leaders who are able to practice reflectively and autonomously in complex environments across system levels with diverse client groups.

The University of Nevada, Reno School of Social work has one concentration, which is Advanced Generalist Practice (AGP). This AGP specialization reflects the practice by preparing graduates to address questions, issues and problems across methods, systems, and fields of practice. As defined at the UNR School of Social Work, AGP is characterized by 1) leadership in innovative problem-solving and change; 2) autonomous practice, and 3) use of integrated, evidence-informed knowledge, values, and skills to address ambiguous, complex problems in an increasingly diverse and ever changing practice environment.

MSW program goals

The goals of the MSW program flow from the MSW Mission and build upon the profession’s core competencies as articulated by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). The goals guiding the MSW program are to prepare advanced generalist practitioners who: 

  1. Identify as professionals, committed to social work’s ethical principles, continuous learning and service that meets the needs of vulnerable and diverse populations.
  2. Demonstrate leadership across system levels through the ability to frame issues in ways that communicate their larger significance and a vision for change, and engage with others in ways that motivate and empower;
  3. Integrate the strengths and person-in-environment perspectives with an array of theoretical models and intervention approaches to uniquely frame and address complex issues across diverse client systems;
  4. Use research to inform practice decisions as well as produce and analyze data to identify client needs, emerging trends and evaluate interventions;
  5. Are able to autonomously navigate diverse, ambiguous and changing local, regional, and global contexts in developing and delivering interventions, policies, and programs that promote health and well-being of individuals, families, groups and society; and
  6. Promote social and economic justice through the provision of equitable and interculturally effective programs, policies and services.

MSW program competencies

In accordance with the School of Social Work’s mission, the MSW Program seeks to facilitate the development of competent advanced generalist social workers. Upon completion of the MSW degree at UNR, students should meet each of the following nine competencies identified by the Council on Social Work Education.

Competency 1: Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior
Competency 2: Engage diversity and difference in practice
Competency 3: Advance human rights and social, economic and environmental justice
Competency 4: Engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice
Competency 5: Engage in policy practice
Competency 6: Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities
Competency 7: Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities
Competency 8: Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities
Competency 9: Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Contact Information: for any program-related questions or inquiries, please contact Graduate Director Dr. Eric Albers at erica@unr.edu or Rachel Huff, Program Coordinator, at rachelhuff@unr.edu or Olga Martinez, MSW Program Advisor at omartinez@unr.edu

Programs of study

The UNR School of Social Work provides a traditional face-to-face program located on the UNR campus in addition to an online MSW. The online and face-face track are taught by the same faculty, provide the same content, and meet the same accreditation standards. The faculty have worked diligently to ensure that both programs are rigorous in nature.

Face-to-face traditional program provided at the UNR campus:

The UNR School of Social Work offers three MSW programs of study, including:

  • A two-year (60-credit) MSW program for students with non-social work bachelor’s degrees and substantial preparation in the liberal arts who are enrolled full-time for two consecutive years.
  • An extended three- or four-year (60-credit) MSW program that is designed for students with non-social work bachelor’s degrees whose time demands preclude enrolling full-time for two years. Applicants to the three-or four-year program must complete their coursework in a prescribed, educational sequence (See TABLE 1).
  • An advanced standing (30-credit) MSW program, which is open only to students who have completed a bachelor’s degree in social work from a CSWE accredited program within the last seven years (see Table 2).

Online program:

  • The 60-credit option (completed over 8 semesters, including summers) for students with non-social work bachelor’s degrees and substantial preparation in the liberal arts who are enrolled full-time (See Table 3).
  • A 30-credit option (completed over 4 semesters, including summer), which is open only to students who have completed a bachelor’s degree in social work from a CSWE accredited program within the last seven years (see Table 4).

MSW admissions

Students who wish to enter the MSW Program must be admitted to the University of Nevada, Reno in the status of a regular graduate standing student. To do so, they must complete a bachelor’s degree and file the required credentials with the Graduate School.

Prospective online MSW students should start the process by talking to an enrollment counselor at: 1-888-896-7603 or refer to UNR Website.

Admission requirements for the (60-credit) MSW programs of study include:

  1. A non-social work bachelor’s degree (with substantial preparation in the liberal arts, including the social sciences, humanities, research, and human biology). In addition, an introductory research methods and an introductory statistics course are required;
  2. An overall undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or 3.25 in the last 60 credits of undergraduate study; or a completed Master’s degree with a minimum GPA of 3.0. Any graduate level coursework, if applicable, must be at a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  3. Evidence of the ability to formulate and present material logically and clearly in written and oral communication;
  4. Career goals and potential which are compatible with the program’s approach to advanced generalist social work practice as characterized by: willingness to work with diverse populations; desire to work with individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations; maturity; commitment to social work; use of self in professional practice; commitment to social justice and social change; a broader focus than a population of personal interest; compatibility with social work values; and a well thought out plan for graduate education. These goals will be demonstrated through a written essay.
  5. A minimum of three professional references.

The Advanced Standing (30-credit) MSW program of study is open only to those students who have completed a bachelor’s degree in social work from a CSWE accredited social work program within the last seven years. To insure that students are not asked to duplicate content covered in their CSWE accredited undergraduate programs, these students must apply to the 30-credit, Advanced Standing MSW program of study option.

Admission requirements for the 30-credit Advanced Standing MSW program of study include:

  1. A minimum overall GPA of 3.0 or 3.25 in the last two years of undergraduate study with at least a “B-” in each individual social work course; or a completed Master’s degree in another field of study with a minimum of a 3.0 GPA. Any graduate level coursework, if applicable, must be at a minimum GPA of 3.0.
  2. Documentation of proficient performance in a BSW field experience as documented by the student’s social work field supervisor;
  3. All other requirements for admission as listed in the 60-credit MSW program of study.

Application procedure (campus)

Applications for the School of Social Work must be received by January 15th of each year for enrollment in the following fall semester. Applications will only be processed if all other documents are received on time. Applicants may be asked to schedule an interview with a faculty member as part of the screening process for admission to the MSW program.

All applicants to the School of Social Work must apply online to the University of Nevada, Reno, Graduate School with ample time for processing. (Suggested completion date by December 15th).

Online Program

Applications for the School of Social Work online program is a rolling application process. Start dates are every fall, spring and summer. All application materials are provided to the student’s enrollment advisor prior to being submitted for consideration for admission.

For more information on the online program, visit our the UNR Masters in Social Work website or please call 1-888-896-7603.

Before starting the application process, we strongly suggest that prospective students print out the MSW Admissions Checklist and use it to ensure your application packet is complete.

Contained in the MSW admissions checklist

  • Application to the Master of Social Work Program (available online);
  • Transcripts from all institutions attended, sent directly from issuing institution(s).
    (UNR graduates: do not send UNR transcripts. If there is transfer work, check with the Graduate School to see if it was submitted – (775) 784-6869);
  • Current Immunization Record;
  • Resumé (uploaded with the application);
  • Essay responses (uploaded with the application);
  • If applying for the Advanced Standing (30-credit) program of study, applicants must submit a copy of their field placement evaluation with their application.
  • Three references from professionals (e.g. supervisors, employers, professors) who can attest to the applicant's aptitude for graduate study and performance in social work roles and tasks using the MSW Recommendation Form. When your recommender's contact information is provided in the application, this link will be automatically emailed directly to them.
  • If applicant has a BSW degree, a fourth reference must be completed by the applicant's field instructor using the Field Instructor Recommendation Form;
  • Scholarship request(s) (optional);
  • Teaching/Research Assistantship application (optional) For on-campus program only. Please download form before completing and submit completed form to the School of Social Work by the admission deadline. Applicants must submit all materials by January 15th. Should January 15th fall on a weekend, application materials will be due by the end of business (5:00 pm P.S.T.) the last weekday BEFORE January 15th.

Transfer credit, class waiver, proficiency examinations, and the timeline for degree completion

Transfer credit (on-campus)

Transfer credits refer to credits that are transferred from another institution. Credits completed at UNR in another program or as a graduate special do not need to be transferred. Transfer credit can be requested on the Graduate Credit Transfer Evaluation Request form available on Graduate School website, and must be signed by the student, major advisor, and graduate director. Transfer credits applied to a master’s program must comply with the time limitation on master’s work (6 years). Thus, if a student took a course five years prior to admission, they would have to complete the degree within one year for the course to apply to the degree. Credits from a completed master’s degree will be exempt from the 8-year time limitation for those students pursuing a doctoral degree.

Consistent with this Graduate School policy, the School of Social Work accepts no more than nine credits from a CSWE accredited social work program.

For requests that meet the above guidelines, student requests to transfer credits or to substitute a course are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Students must submit course documentation (syllabus, bibliography, and assignments) for each course for which transfer credit is sought. Based on this material, the MSW Program Coordinator makes a determination regarding the course equivalencies. Only foundation-level (600-level) courses may be considered for transfer credit or course waiver/substitution.

Transfer credit (online)

Transfer credits from another institution are not allowed in the online MSW program. Limited exceptions apply with regard to select social work courses taken at UNR as a graduate special student. Requests are evaluated by the MSW Program Coordinator on a case-by-case basis.

Proficiency examinations

Proficiency examinations are not used for any MSW program of study

Timeline for degree completion

Master’s degrees: All course work must be completed within six years preceding the awarding of the degree.

Forms and deadlines required by the Graduate School

Declaration of Advisor/Major Advisor/Committee Chair form

  • For master’s students, the completed form must be submitted to Graduate School by the end of the student’s second semester
  • For doctoral and MFA students, the completed form must be submitted to Graduate School by the end of the student’s third semester

Program study form

  • For master’s students, the completed form must be submitted to Graduate School by the end of the student’s third semester

Graduation application deadlines

  • Must be submitted to the graduate school several weeks in advance. Check website for exact dates

Notice of completion

  • Completed form should be submitted after all requirements have been met.

Exit survey

Graduate School Forms

Academic credit for life experience

In accordance with CSWE accreditation standards, academic credit for life experience and previous work experience is not given under any circumstance.

Grad special status (on campus) 

In keeping with the Graduate School and the Social of Social Work policy of accepting up to nine credits of course work, students who are not currently admitted to the MSW program may enroll in designated foundation courses with the approval of the MSW Program Coordinator. Grad Special Status provides an avenue for students with a baccalaureate degree who are considering a career in social work to gain a better understanding of the nature of the profession and to gauge its fit for them personally.

 

MSW advising

On campus MSW advising

MSW Program Coordinator: provides ongoing support and guidance for MSW students including problem solving, support with any conflict, resolution, disciplinary actions, and overall coordination of program.

MSW Program Advisor: provides advisement on courses and your program of study and graduation. Students are encouraged to make appointments with their advisors to explore issues affecting their progress in the MSW program and the requirements of the School and University. The Academic Advisor does not provide personal counseling or social services.

Online MSW advising

There are a number of individuals available to advise and support online students.

MSW Program Coordinator: provides ongoing support and guidance for MSW students including problem-solving, support with any conflict, resolution, disciplinary actions, and overall coordination of program.

Support coaches: In addition, UNR’s MSW online students also have success coaches. These individuals will provide consistent check-ins with each student to ensure student support throughout the program.

MSW Program Advisor: provides advisement on courses and your program of study and graduation. Students are encouraged to make appointments with their advisors to explore issues affecting their progress in the MSW program and the requirements of the School and University. The Academic Advisor does not provide personal counseling or social services.

 

Social work student community

There are two student-run organizations that represent the graduate student body at the School Meeting, which is the policy-making body of the School of Social Work. These student representatives are elected by their peers and serve on a voluntary basis. The School Meeting Representatives attend all regular School Meetings and special School Meetings at the request of the Director of the School of Social Work. He or she acts as the Associations’ representatives to the School during such meetings and represent the best interests of the student body. These two student organizations, SWAG and Phi Alpha Honor Society, also coordinate social and community outreach events for the graduate students.

A faculty advisor is available to each of these student organizations. Students who serve in an active leadership position in either organization may be able to negotiate a one-unit Independent Study credit related to their leadership activities and learning.

The Social Work Associated Graduates (SWAG)

The Social Work Graduate Student Association is open to all MSW students, and all students are encouraged to participate. For more information about SWAG please see the Student Organization page of the School of Social Work.

Phi Alpha Honor Society

The UNR Chapter of Phi Alpha Honor Society was founded in 2002. Phi Alpha is a national honor society for social work students, with chapters at universities throughout the United States. Students are invited to submit their UNR transcripts once a year for consideration for induction into Phi Alpha. Students who are deemed eligible for membership are inducted into the organization during the spring semester. The cost for membership is $25 for the first year and $10 for each subsequent year.

National Association of Social Workers (NASW)

Students are encouraged to join the NASW. NASW is the largest membership organization of professional social workers in the world. NASW works to enhance the professional growth and development of its members, to create and maintain professional standards, and to advance sound social policies.

Students in an accredited program of social work education are eligible to join NASW at a discounted rate. You can apply for membership online at National Association of Social Workers (NASW). To learn more about NASW or to become involved at the local level, contact the Nevada chapter's office.

Social Work Alumni Chapter

The Social Work Alumni Association offers graduates the opportunity to give back to, maintain connections and identify more closely with the School and University. Additionally, the Social Work Alumni Association provides a forum for alumni to network with professionals and advance the common goals of the profession. The mission of the Association is to unite graduates, faculty, and students of the UNR School of Social Work to maximize impact on social welfare policy, identify community needs, strengthen the community, and provide opportunities for continuing education and collaborative research. Students or graduates who are interested in joining the Social Work Alumni Association should call the School of Social Work at (775) 784-6542.

 

Scholarships and financial aid information

Financing a graduate education is high on the list of most students’ concerns. The School of Social Work encourages students to carefully plan for their graduate studies and to seek out information on scholarships and financial aid. Students occasionally ask us if it is possible to work more than half-time and attend graduate school. Our answer is always the same: we don’t recommend it. As an MSW student you will be taking two to three graduate level classes each semester and working 15 hours a week in an internship during your field placement courses. Graduate school is a transformative period in most students’ lives; give yourself a chance to experience it deeply.

There are a limited number of Field Practicum placements that provide stipends. To learn more about these please contact the Field Education Program Coordinator in the School of Social Work (775) 784-6542.

You will find information on the School of Social Work scholarships available for students on our website: School of Social Work Scholarships. For more information on general university scholarships/financial aid please visit Student Financial Aid & Scholarships.

School of Social Work scholarships

The School of Social Work at the University of Nevada, Reno, offers several different scholarships to
juniors, seniors, and graduate students admitted to the social work program. A sample of scholarship
awards are listed below, descriptions and criteria are listed on our website. 

  • Barbara West Larsen Scholarship
  • Heather Morsberger Memorial Scholarship
  • John and Louise Semenza Family
  • Kris Tower Memorial Scholarship
  • Alicia Smalley Scholarship for Social Justice

To apply for these scholarships, please fill out the scholarship application found in MyNEVADA 2.0. Make sure that you identify that you are a Social Work student so your application comes to our school for consideration. It is also helpful if you reference a scholarship in your scholarship application essay questions and why you are a good fit.

Graduate Research and Teaching Assistantships (on-campus only)

Several part-time, research/teaching assistantships for graduate applicants are available in the School of Social Work. The number of Graduate Assistantship (GA) positions varies from year to year. Graduate Assistants typically work 10 hours/week. The most common type of work is teaching or research-related. In addition, GAs are expected to participate in recruitment efforts, orientation activities, and participate in other leadership roles within the School. Graduate Assistantships come with a partial tuition waiver. Out-of-state students with a GA position have their out of state tuition waived for the duration of the Assistantship.

Applications for Graduate Assistantships are due on January 15th.

Health insurance

All domestic degree-seeking graduate students, who are enrolled in six or more credits (regardless of the course level) in a semester, will be automatically enrolled and billed for the University-sponsored health insurance for each term they are eligible (fall & spring/summer). If a student has other comparable coverage and would like to waive out of the student health insurance, it is the student’s responsibility to complete the University online waiver form prior to the deadline. If approved, a health insurance waiver is good for the current academic year only. A new waiver must be submitted each academic year. All international graduate students are required to carry student health insurance, and the cost will be automatically added to your student account. Any international graduate students with insurance questions must contact the Office of International Students and Scholars (OISS) directly.

Leave of absence

Continuous Enrollment: To maintain “good standing” all graduate students are required to enroll in a minimum of three (3) graduate credits each fall and spring semester until they graduate. International students may be required to enroll in nine graduate credits each fall and spring semester depending on the requirements of their visa. All students holding assistantships (whether teaching or research assistantships) are required to enroll in a minimum of six (6) graduate credits each semester they hold the assistantship.

Students in good standing may request a leave of absence by completing a Leave of Absence form during which time they are not required to maintain continuous registration. Usually, a leave of absence is approved for one or two semesters. The leave of absence request may be extended by the student filing an additional leave of absence form. Students applying for a leave of absence should not have any “incomplete” grades which could be changed to “F” and have a detrimental impact on their cumulative GPA. Requests for leave of absences must be received by the Graduate School no later than the last day of enrollment for the semester the leave is to begin.

 

The MSW curriculum

Social work curriculum overview

Once students apply to and are accepted into the Master of Social Work program, they will follow the MSW course sequence. This sequence is established in accordance with CSWE’s (Council on Social Work Education) Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. Social work courses are designed to complement and build upon one another and therefore cannot be taken out of sequence (See Appendix A).

Social work programs of study on-campus and online
Programs of study (on-campus) Programs of study (online)
Advanced (30-credit program of study) Advanced (30-credit program of study)
Traditional (60-credit program of study) Traditional (30-credit program of study)

Social work field practicum

The field practicum provides students with an opportunity to apply academic knowledge and practice skills gained in the classroom to authentic human service experiences. Field agencies offer guidance and supervision in preparing graduates for entry-level professional practice. University faculty members serve as liaisons between the agencies and the students. These faculty liaisons facilitate a weekly or bi-weekly seminar to aid students in the synthesis of classroom knowledge with their social service experience. Students enroll in four credits of Field Practicum (225 hours) per semester. Please visit the Field Practicum link for all practicum related instructions, manuals and forms. Prior to placement, students are not permitted to contact agencies directly to discuss field practicum.

 

MSW course descriptions

The following are descriptions of required courses in the MSW program of study.

Required foundation courses

SW 610 Structural Oppression
The first of two courses that promote a multidimensional understanding of human functioning across systems and the life course. Introduces oppression and examines the experiences of diverse POPULATIONS.

SW 611 Theoretical Perspectives on Human Behavior
The second course in a two-course sequence that promotes a multidimensional understanding of human functioning and behavior across systems and the life course. This course specifically examines human behavior and functioning among individuals and families. In particular, the course emphasizes an evidence-informed approach to assessing human functioning. The course advances students’ ability to critically apply a range of theories and research to better understand and assess human behavior and development.

SW 620 Social Work Methods with Individuals
One of a four-course sequence that emphasizes the competent application of skills, knowledge and values to social work practice. This course focuses on developing competency in intervening with individuals. Students will learn how to engage in each stage of the social work intervention process with individuals, including: rapport building, exploration, assessment, planning, implementation, goal attainment, evaluation and termination. This course furthers students’ understanding of the strengths-based, generalist social work perspective; in particular students will learn the various roles social workers may play in work with individuals. Special emphasis is placed on analyzing the ways in which client characteristics (i.e., biological, psychological and socioeconomic factors as well as class, gender, ethnicity, culture, and sexual orientation) interact with the resources and demands of the environment in identifying appropriate intervention strategies. Students will be asked to use critical thinking skills to identify and implement interventions with individuals that are evidenced-informed, as well as contextually and culturally relevant.

SW 621 Social Work Methods with Groups
One of a four-course sequence that emphasizes the competent application of skills, knowledge and values to social work practice. This course focuses on developing competency in intervening with small groups. Students will learn how to engage in each stage of the social work intervention process with groups, including: formation, initial/beginning stage, middle stage, termination stage and evaluation. Students will continue their use of an evidence-informed approach to practice through identification and critique of group curriculums. Special emphasis is placed on analyzing the ways in which member characteristics (i.e., biological, psychological and socioeconomic factors as well as class, gender, ethnicity, culture, and sexual orientation) influence communication, interaction and dynamics within groups.

SW 623 Social Work with Organizations, Communities and Legislatures
One of a four-course sequence that emphasizes the competent application of skills, knowledge and values to social work practice. This course focuses on developing competency in working with organizations, communities and legislative bodies. This course furthers the understanding of the strengths-based, generalist social work perspective. In this course students will learn public speaking, elements of grant writing, budgeting, advocacy, lobbying and written and oral persuasion techniques as methods of assessing and responding to community and organizational issues. Students will learn to attend to the cultural, ideological, and diverse nuances present in large groups of people and within complex problems while maintaining a critically reflexive position in relation to their own culture, privilege, ideology, personal values, and biases. Students will be asked to use critical thinking skills to identify and implement interventions with organizations and communities that are evidenced-informed, as well as contextually and culturally relevant.

SW 624 Social Work Methods with Couples and Families
One of a four-course sequence that emphasizes the competent application of skills, knowledge and values to social work practice. This course focuses on developing competency in intervening with couples and families. Students will learn how to engage in each stage of the social work intervention process with couples and families, including: rapport building, exploration, assessment, planning, implementation, goal attainment, evaluation and termination. This course furthers students’ understanding of the strengths-based, generalist social work perspective. Special emphasis is placed on analyzing the ways in which client characteristics (i.e., biological, psychological and socioeconomic factors as well as class, gender, ethnicity, culture, and sexual orientation) interact with the resources and demands of the environment in identifying appropriate intervention strategies. Students will be asked to use critical thinking skills to identify and implement interventions with couples and families that are evidenced-informed, as well as contextually and culturally relevant.

SW 630 Social Work History and Social Welfare Policy
Explores the historical development of the social work profession and current policies governing the social service delivery system within the United States. Social policy is presented as a social construction influenced by a range of ideologies and interests. Special attention is paid to social welfare policy and programs relevant to the practice of social work, including poverty, child and family well-being, mental and physical disability, health, and racial, ethnic, and sexual minorities. The course includes a focus on the role of policy in creating, maintaining or eradicating social inequities.

SW 640 Elements of Evidence-Informed Practice
This is the first in a two-course sequence that examines concepts, principles, and methods of scientific inquiry, emphasizing qualitative and quantitative designs, assessment of practice and program effectiveness, and critical use of existing research when working with individuals, couples, families, or groups. A key focus is on understanding the reciprocal relationship between practice and research. The goal of the course is to prepare competent research consumers who view evidence-informed practice as a “process of inquiry,” and continually examine the foundations of “best practices.” Emphasis is placed on a) learning to formulate research and evaluation questions; b) conducting ongoing analysis and critique of research literature, and c) using empirically valid data to identify social problems relevant to practice. Additionally, the course introduces cultural and ethical issues present in all investigative endeavors and the unique issues involved in studying special populations and populations at risk.

SW 680 Foundation Practicum I
Integration of professional content through a weekly one hour seminar and at least 15 hours of social worker supervised placement in an approved practicum site.

SW 681 Foundation Practicum II
Continued integration of professional content through a weekly one hour seminar and at least 15 hours of social worker supervised placement in an approved practicum site.

Required concentration courses

SW 710 Advanced multidimensional assessment
Critical examination of the language and classification systems used in mental health.

This course introduces students to the concepts and language of mental health and mental disorders, and the influence of social structural factors on each. Structural inequalities in mental health diagnosis and treatment are covered, particularly among groups that historically have been oppressed and marginalized. In addition, the history of the classification system of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual is reviewed, as well as the tension between the use of a classification system based on the medical model, and the assumptions and values of the social work profession. Students will learn to distinguish mental health diagnostic categories and gain skills in the diagnostic process. As students deepen their understanding of mental health diagnosis, they will also gain an appreciation for the benefits and limitations of diagnosis as part of the helping process. The primary goals are for students to gain skills in using the DSM for assessment, treatment planning, and for conversing as a member of a multidisciplinary team —while maintaining a person-centered approach to helping clients.

SW 720 Intervention Approaches with Individuals
Integration of theories of human behavior and select intervention approaches with individuals.

This is the first in a series of three direct practice courses with a focus on integrating advanced theory and evidence-informed knowledge with social work practice skills. Students will learn to implement three approaches used widely to understand psychological factors in helping individuals deal with obstacles and achieve their goals: relational, cognitive behavioral and narrative therapy. These practice approaches represent variants of the major psychological frameworks—psychodynamic, behavioral, and post-modern. Each supports social work’s person-in-environment perspective and the profession’s emphasis on resilience and strengths among oppressed and underserved populations. This course will provide students with opportunities for experiential learning and skill-building in carrying out these intervention approaches. Professional responsibility for ongoing learning and self-development as a reflective practitioner is woven throughout the course.

SW 721 Therapeutic Interventions with Groups
Develop and facilitate therapeutic groups from the perspective of selected theoretical frameworks; knowledge of systems theory and special properties of groups that can be used as a mechanism for improved coping and change.

SW 723 Social Work Administration I
First in a two-course sequence. Prepares students for advanced macro social work practice; program and agency planning/development, and the knowledge/skills required to assume administrative and policy-practice roles.

SW 724 Therapeutic Interventions with Families
Students will learn to implement three approaches that are used widely to help families cope with obstacles and achieve their goals—multigenerational family therapy, structural family therapy, and feminist family therapy. These frameworks incorporate the group practice techniques that students learned at the foundation level, support social work’s emphasis on resilience and strengths, and can be used with families across practice fields. This course will provide students with opportunities for experiential learning and skill-building in carrying out these intervention approaches. Ethnicity, culture, gender, and family life course are central in this regard, as students learn to tailor family interventions to the needs of clients. Professional responsibility for ongoing learning and self-development as a reflective practitioner is woven throughout the course.

SW 725 Social Work Administration II
One in a two-course sequence that prepares students to engage in advanced social work practice with macro systems. This course focuses specifically on the knowledge and skills required to assume administrative and policy-practice roles within social service settings. In particular, the course highlights public and private budgetary processes as they influence and guide social service delivery, fundraising, management, program development, strategic planning and policy analysis, development and implementation. Students will be encouraged to critically examine competing needs, differential power structures and value conflicts inherent to social service delivery within the United States in general and Nevada in particular.

SW 741 Practice and Program Evaluation
Develop evaluation practice skills. Emphasis on middle and later stages of the evaluation process. Includes learning to use a logic model; developing data collection plans; analyzing qualitative/quantitative data; presenting findings.

SW 780 Advanced Practicum I
Integration of professional content through a weekly one-hour seminar and development of advanced generalist practice skills through supervised placement in community agencies.

SW 781 Advanced Practicum II
Continuation of integration of professional content through a weekly one-hour seminar and development of advanced generalist practice skills through supervised placement in community agencies.

SW 793 Integrative Case-Based Seminar: Advanced Generalist Practice
Competent social work practice involves broad knowledge of person-in-environment and a full integration of social work knowledge, skills, theory, evidence, and values and ethics, and the ability to clearly articulate a rationale for decision-making. This course gives students the opportunity to analyze and apply with greater depth, breadth, and specificity their knowledge, skills, and theories to values and ethics, diversity, populations at risk, social and economic justice, human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policy, social work practice, research, and field education. Therefore, this competency based course builds upon all previous courses in the curriculum and their field internships utilizing a multilevel case study method and prepares students for professional practice. Case studies will require students to intervene at all systems levels and address the required accreditation-based social work competencies. The course will be taken concurrently with students’ final field placement to enhance reciprocal learning in class and in field.

 

School of Social Work policies

Academic integrity

The School of Social Work adheres to the University of Nevada, Reno Academic Standards Policy for Students concerning issues of academic integrity. Please see the UNR website for a complete description, definitions and policies regarding class conduct and academic dishonesty.

Accommodation for students with disabilities

Students who require additional support due to disabling conditions should discuss their needs with their instructors at the start of each semester. Accommodations for all reasonable requests will be made for documented disabling conditions. In addition, students are encouraged to contact the UNR Disability Resource Center at (775) 784-6000 to access a range of supportive services.

Attendance policy

The faculty of the School of Social Work believe that classroom attendance and participation are critical aspects of professional socialization. Students are responsible for assisting in the creation of a learning environment that promotes such socialization. To do so, students should assume responsibility for their own learning and be engaged within the course room. It is expected for students to log into the online classroom a minimum of three times a week to be successfully engaged. Attendance and participation will be part of grading, as determined by the course instructor. Opportunities for make-up assignments are determined at the discretion of individual instructors.

Confidentiality of case material outside of an agency

NASW Code of Ethics requirements regarding confidentiality of client information extend to the use of confidential information from field work in classes, seminars and in student assignments. Students may not divulge client, collateral or collegial information, disguising all names, demographic information and any case details that might identify a client or co-worker. Client files and records should never be removed from the agency for any purpose.

Nondiscrimination policy

The programs of the UNR School of Social Work are conducted without discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, creed, ethnic or national origin, disability, political orientation, or sexual orientation. This policy applies to the baccalaureate and master’s programs, the field education program, and all admission, employment, and financial aid decisions.

Retention

In its description of the Social Work major, the University of Nevada, Reno catalog states that:

“The admission and retention of students in the program is subject to the professional judgment of the social work faculty.”

Retention in the MSW Program at UNR is based on student performance in two general areas: academics and adherence to professional values and standards of behavior. Retention in the social work major requires students and maintain a 3.0 (B) overall grade point average—with a letter grade of “C” or higher in each of the graduate course, including the required 3 credits of electives. Additionally, students must adhere to the academic and professional standards outlined in UNR’s Student Handbook for Student Code of Conduct, the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and the State Board of Examiners for Social Workers, Nevada Legislature’s Standards of Practice.

Remediation and termination policy

The School of Social Work encourages students, staff, faculty, field instructors, and faculty liaisons to deal directly with concerns as they arise. The Remediation and Termination policy is applied when previous attempts to address an issue have not been successful. Concerns may include, but are not limited to, academic integrity, academic achievement (including field practicum achievement), and/or student conduct. As discussed below, the policy is applied in two phases. The first phase explores the situation further, while the second phase sets out to resolve the situation.

Exceptions to the procedures described below are allowed in cases where students have engaged in particularly egregious conduct, for example ethical or legal misconduct, actual or threatened physical or verbal aggression, academic dishonesty, or refusal to implement the recommended Action Plan. In such instances, the Remediation Committee may refer the student directly to the appropriate administrative, medical, and/or legal authorities.

Concerns are addressed according to two categories:

Low Level Concerns include but are not limited to behaviors in which there is:

  • No evidence of harm or risk of harm to self or others, agency or university
  • A specific identifiable problem area
  • Demonstrated student awareness, initiative, and ability to resolve the issue
  • Evidence that the impact is limited to the student directly involved in the issue

High Level Concerns include, but are not limited to, behaviors in which there is/are:

  • Evidence of harm or risk of harm to self, others, agency or university
  • Direct violation of UNR Student Code of Conduct, NASW Code of Ethics, agency policies or standards, other relevant policies governing social work practice
  • Failure to demonstrate minimal level of competency on one or more of the CSWE and/or AGP identified practice behaviors
  • Diffuse concerns and which affect multiple aspects of the learning environment
  • Concern regarding how the student’s behavior negatively impacts the learning environment for others
  • Concern for a student already on remediation status- who failed to successfully remediate through his/her Action Plan
  • Situations where additional performance concerns arise for a student currently or previously on remediation status

The following steps are employed to understand the situation further:

Phase one - problem exploration and clarification

  1. The Remediation Committee is convened specific to the student concern. The committee is convened by the BSW, MSW or Field Program Coordinator and includes the faculty member involved, the student’s advisor(s), and any other University professional deemed appropriate given the nature of the concern;
  2. The Remediation Committee identifies the relevant social work competency(ies) and associated practice behavior(s) that are not being demonstrated, and/or the professional ethical standard(s), agency standards/policies (i.e. HIPAA) and/or University standards for student conduct that are in question;
  3. Student is notified of the concern(s) and Remediation Committee’s assessment within 2 working days of the committee meeting and is invited to meet with the committee;
  4. Student meets with members of the Remediation Committee to discuss the concern; and
  5. Remediation committee determines:
    a. No concern present, no further action needed; or
    b. Level of concern is identified and student is placed on remediation status by Remediation Committee (proceed to Phase Two of the policy).

Should the student not agree with the Remediation Committee’s assessment of the concern, they may grieve the decision (see grievance procedure).

Phase two - remediation

Once the situation and concerns have been identified, the remediation committee will work with the student through a series of decision points. The charts below highlight these decisions according to the level of concern that has been identified.

*An executive session is a closed meeting of the faculty of the whole in which student performance issues and/or progress are addressed.

Grievance procedure

Under the remediation policy, there are 4 points at which a student can initiate a grievance: 

  1. If the student believes that the behavior cited in the original concern is unfounded; 
  2. If the student believes that the Remediation Committee's identification of a relevant competency, practice behavior, code of conduct, ethical standard is inaccurate;
  3. If the student believes that the remediation decision or Action Plan does not address the original concern; or
  4. If the student believes they are being held to a higher standard of performance than other students completing the same program of study.

The written grievance should be submitted to the Director of The School of Social Work no later than 10 working days following the decision point in question (see 1-4 above). The burden of proof during the grievance process rests with the student. If the Director determines that the student has provided adequate evidence to support his or her grievance, the Director may dismiss the issue with no further action required. Alternatively, if the Director determines that there is not adequate evidence to support the student’s grievance, he or she will redirect the student to the Remediation Team for further steps/action. The Director will provide his or her decision to the student and Remediation Team in writing within 10 working days of receipt of the student’s written grievance.

Grade appeal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the University’s policy by which students may appeal a grade. This policy states “…a grade assigned by an instructor is only subject to the appeals procedure if:

  • There was a clerical/administrative error in the calculation and/or assignment of the grade;
  • The grade assignment was based on factors other than the student's performance in the course and/or completion of course requirements; or
  • The grade assignment meant that the student was held to more demanding standards than other students in the same section of the course.

The burden of proof of these conditions rests on the student.” The policy advises students to begin the process by consulting with the course Instructor. If the issue is not resolved at that level students may proceed with filing a Grade Appeal Form. The full policy and procedures for filing a Grade Appeal can be found at under section 3,510 of the University Administrative Manual.

Appendix A

Table 1

60 credit MSW program of study

  • Two year program (full-time)
    TWO Year Program (Full-Time)
    Semester Course Title Credits
    Fall (1)  SW 610 Structural Oppression 3
    SW 620 SW Methods with Individuals 3
    SW 624 SW Methods w/Couples and Families 3
    SW 630 SW History & Social Welfare Policy 3
    SW 680 Foundation Practicum I 3
     Total 15
    Spring (1) SW 611 Theoretical Perspectives On Human Behavior 3
    SW 621 SW Methods with Groups 3
    SW 623 SW Methods w/ Orgs, Comms & Legs 3
    SW 640 Elements of Evidence Informed Practice 3
    SW 681 Foundation Practicum II 3
    Total 15
    Fall (2) SW 710 Advanced Multi-Dimensional Assessment 3
    SW 720 Therapeutic Interventions w/ Individuals 3
    SW 723 SW Administration I 3
    SW 780 Advanced Practicum I 3
    SW 721 Intervention Approaches with Groups 3
    Total 15
    Spring (2) SW 724 Therapeutic Interventions w/ Families 3
    SW 725 SW Administration II 3
    SW 741 Practice and Program Evaluation 3
    SW 781 Advanced Practicum II 3
    SW 793 Integrative Case-Based Seminar: Advanced Generalist Practice 3
    Total 15
  • Three year program (part-time)
    THREE Year Program (Part-Time)
    Semester Course Title Credits
    Fall (1)  SW 610 Structural Oppression 3
    SW 630 SW History & Social Welfare Policy 3
     Total 6
    Spring (1) SW 611 Theoretical Perspectives On Human Behavior 3
    SW 623 SW Methods w/ Orgs, Comms & Legs 3
    SW 640 Elements of Evidence Informed Practice 3
    Total 9
    Fall (2) SW 620 SW Methods with Individuals 3
    SW 624 SW Methods w/ Couples and Families 3
    SW 680 Foundation Practicum I 3
    Total 9
    Spring (2) SW 621 SW Mehods with Groups 3
    SW 681 Foundation Practicum II 3
    Total 6
    Fall (3) SW 710 Advanced Multi-Dimensional Assessment 3
    SW 720 Therapeutic Interventions w/ Individuals 3
    SW 723 SW Administration I 3
    SW 780 Advanced Practicum I 3
    SW 721 Intervention Approaches with Groups 3
    Total 15
    Spring (3) SW 724 Therapeutic Interventions w/ Families 3
    SW 725 SW Administration II 3
    SW 741 Practice and Program Evaluation 3
    SW 781 Advanced Practicum II 3
    SW 793 Integrative Case-Based Seminar: Advanced Generalist Practice 3
    Total 15
  • Four year program (part-time)
    FOUR Year Program (Part-Time)
    Semester Course Title Credits
    Fall (1)  SW 610 Structural Oppression 3
    SW 630 SW History & Social Welfare Policy 3
     Total 6
    Spring (1) SW 611 Theoretical Perspectives On Human Behavior 3
    SW 623 SW Methods w/ Orgs, Comms & Legs 3
    SW 640 Elements of Evidence Informed Practice 3
    Total 9
    Fall (2) SW 620 SW Methods with Individuals 3
    SW 624 SW Methods w/ Couples and Families 3
    SW 680 Foundation Practicum I 3
    Total 9
    Spring (2) SW 621 SW Mehods with Groups 3
    SW 681 Foundation Practicum II 3
    Total 6
    Fall (3) SW 710 Advanced Multi-Dimensional Assessment 3
    SW 723 SW Administration I 3
    SW 721 Intervention Approaches with Groups 3
    Total 9
    Spring (3) SW 725 SW Administration II 3
    SW 741 Practice and Program Evaluation 3
    Total 6
    Fall (4) SW 720 Therapeutic Interventions w/ Individuals 3
    SW 780 Advanced Practicum I 3
    Total 6
    Spring (4) SW 724 Therapeutic Interventions w/ Families 3
    SW 781 Advanced Practicum II 3
    SW 793 Integrative Case-Based Seminar: Advanced Generalist Practice 3
    Total 9

30 credit MSW program of study

Table 2

  • One year program (full-time)
    Advanced Standing (Full-Time)
    Semester Course Title Credits
    Fall SW 710 Advanced Multi-Dimensional Assessment 3
    SW 720 Therapeutic Interventions w/ Individuals 3
    SW 723 SW Administration I 3
    SW 780 Advanced Practicum I 3
    SW 721 Intervention Approaches with Groups 3
    Total 15
    Spring SW 724 Therapeutic Interventions w/ Families 3
    SW 725 SW Administration II 3
    SW 741 Practice and Program Evaluation 3
    SW 781 Advanced Practicum II 3
    SW 793 Integrative Case-Based Seminar: Advanced Generalist Practice 3
    Total 15
  • Two-year program (part-time)
    Advanced Standing (Part-Time)
    Semester Course Title Credits
    Fall (1) SW 710 Advanced Multi-Dimensional Assessment 3
    SW 723 SW Administration I 3
    SW 721 Intervention Approaches with Groups 3
    Total 9
    Spring (1) SW 725 SW Administration II 3
    SW 741 Practice and Program Evaluation 3
    Total 6
    Fall (2) SW 720 Therapeutic Interventions w/ Individuals 3
    SW 780 Advanced Practicum I 3
    Total 6
    Spring (2) SW 724 Therapeutic Interventions w/ Families 3
    SW 781 Advanced Practicum II 3
    SW 793 Integrative Case-Based Seminar: Advanced Generalist Practice 3
    Total 9

Online MSW traditional 60-credit program of study

Foundation part (600-level courses) first 30 hours

Explicit curriculum

1st or 2nd semester

  • SW 640 Elements of Evidence Informed Practice (3 Credits) first 7-week course
  • SW 611 Theoretical Perspective on Human Behvior (3 Credits) second 7-week course
  • SW 620 SW Methods: Individuals (3 credits) 14-week course

1st or 2nd semester

  • SW 630 SW History & Social Welfare Policy (3 credits) first 7-week course
  • SW 623 Methods w/ Orgs, Communities & Legislatures (3 credits) second 7-week course
  • SW 610 Structural Oppression I (3 credits) 14-week course

3rd semester

  • SW 624 SW Methods w/ Couples and Families (3 credits) 14-week course
  • SW 680 Foundation Practicum (3 credits) 14-week course

4th semester

  • SW 621 SW Methods with Groups (3 credits) 14-week course
  • SW 681 Foundation Practicum II (3 credits) 14-week course

Concentration part (700-level courses) remaining 32 hours

Explicit curriculum

5th or 6th semester

  • SW 723 SW Administration I (3 credits) first 7-week course
  • SW 741 Practice & Program Evaluation (3 credits) second 7-week course
  • SW 725 SW Administration II (3 credits) 14-week course

5th or 6th semester

  • SW 720 Intervention Approaches with Individuals (3 credits) first 7-week course
  • SW 724 Therapeutic Interventions with Families (3 credits) second 7-week course
  • SW 710 Advanced Multi-dimensional Assessment (3 credits) 14-week course

7th semester

  • SW 721 Intervention Approaches with Groups (3 credits) 14-week course
  • SW 780 Advanced Practicum I (3 credits) 14-week course

8th semester - graduating

  • SW 781 Advanced Practicum II (3 credits) 14-week course
  • SW 793 Integrative Case-Based Seminar: Advanced Generalist Practice (3 credits) 14-week course

Duration of 700 level classes: 1 year and 4 months

Duration of program: 2 years and 8 months

Total: 60 credits and 900 internship hours

Online MSW advanced standing 30-credit program of study

Concentration 700-level courses 

Explicit curriculum

1st or 2nd semester

    • SW 723 SW Administration I (3 credits) first 7-week course
    • SW 741 Practice & Program Evaluation (3 credits) second 7-week course
    • SW 725 SW Administration II (3 credits) 14-week course

    1st or 2nd semester

    • SW 720 Intervention Approaches with Individuals (3 credits) first 7-week course
    • SW 724 Therapeutic Interventions with Families (3 credits) second 7-week course
    • SW 710 Advanced Multi-dimensional Assessment (3 credits) 14-week course

    3rd semester

    • SW 721 Intervention Approaches with Groups (3 credits) 14-week course
    • SW 780 Advanced Practicum I (3 credits) 14-week course

    4th semester - graduating

    • SW 781 Advanced Practicum II (3 credits) 14-week course
    • SW 793 Integrative Case-Based Seminar: Advanced Generalist Practice (3 credits) 14-week course

    Duration of program: 1 years and 4 months

    Total: 30 credits and 450 internship hours