Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Pure mathematics. Applied mathematics. Statistics and probability.

The Department of Mathematics & Statistics is a teaching and research-oriented department that offers graduate degrees (M.S. and Ph.D.) and undergraduate degrees in Pure and Applied Mathematics and Statistics. With over 40 faculty members with roughly two-thirds of those in tenured or tenure-track positions, the department offers a wide range of experts to advise students and do research.

Why choose our programs?

Department Chair Tin-Yau Tam in the Math Department office hallway.

Dedicated faculty

Our leading research-active faculty receive funding from national and international agencies, providing a thriving working and learning environment, valuable experience, and financial support to pursue their own research.

Lake Tahoe sunset.

Rich outdoor environment

Our campus sits just north of Reno's thriving downtown and is less than an hour away from some of the most beautiful outdoor recreation areas in the country like Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

Professor Mihye Ahn discussing her research poster.

Leading research

Our faculty and graduate students are leading cutting-edge research in the fields of operator algebras, number theory, applied mathematics, topology, statistics and probability, and many others.

Math department news

Diana Moss smiles, wearing a blue top.

Paving the Wolf Pack Way: Diana Moss

Paving the Wolf Pack Way is a series of stories showcasing Wolf Pack Way alumni from the College of Science.

Three portraits of podcast participants and the Discover Science podcast identifier.

Discover Science podcast: Ken Ono and "The Man Who Knew Infinity"

Renowned number theorist Dr. Ken Ono shares his deep connection to the life and work of Srinivasa Ramanujan in the latest episode of the Discover Science podcast.

A screengrab from the movie shows the actors playing Hardy (left) and Ramanujan (right) as they walk at Trinity College.

Why does "The Man Who Knew Infinity" matter?

Mathematician Ken Ono will present his Discover Science lecture answering this question on March 10, following a screening of the movie “The Man Who Knew Infinity.”