Paving the Wolf Pack Way: Lisa LeMond

Celebrating Mayo Clinic cardiologist alumna on International Women's Day

Lisa LeMond smiles, wearing a black jacket over a floral print shirt.

Lisa LeMond graduated from the University with dual degrees in biology and chemistry in 2004, then with her M.D. in 2008 from the School of Medicine.

Paving the Wolf Pack Way: Lisa LeMond

Celebrating Mayo Clinic cardiologist alumna on International Women's Day

Lisa LeMond graduated from the University with dual degrees in biology and chemistry in 2004, then with her M.D. in 2008 from the School of Medicine.

Lisa LeMond smiles, wearing a black jacket over a floral print shirt.

Lisa LeMond graduated from the University with dual degrees in biology and chemistry in 2004, then with her M.D. in 2008 from the School of Medicine.

Lisa LeMond graduated from the University with dual degrees in biology and biochemistry in 2004, then graduated from the School of Medicine in 2008. LeMond was named the College of Science’s 2019 Young Alumni of the Year.

After graduating, she did her medical residency at the University of Colorado Hospital, then was a fellow in cardiology at the Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine. She had another fellowship at the University of Colorado Hospital in advance heart failure. LeMond is a board-certified cardiologist specializing in advanced heart failure and cardiac transplantation. LeMond currently works at the renowned Mayo Clinic. Her current titles include Assistant Professor and Consultant in the Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, where she has practiced since 2016. She is also Program Director for the Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology Fellowship. Her clinical interests include advanced heart failure, cardiac transplantation, mechanical circulatory support, and cardiorenal syndromes.

LeMond is also very encouraging of women interested in pursuing medicine, as exemplified in this article celebrating her Young Alumni of the Year Award. Only 20% of cardiologists are female.

“Don’t ever let people tell you that you shouldn’t do something that you love,” LeMond said, in encouragement of women who want to pursue STEM careers.

What does it mean to you to be a Wolf Pack Way alumnus?

Being a Wolf Pack Way alumnus is a huge achievement. I am proud of the education I received at the University. As an undergraduate student, I never would have imagined where my career would take me. The University gave me a strong foundation from which to build and continue to grow, through medical school, residency, fellowship and advanced fellowship. I hope that my journey will inspire other students to continue to work towards their goals and know that their potential is unlimited.

What person or resource on campus was most instrumental to helping you succeed?

The most integral person in my success at the University was my undergraduate chemistry professor, Dr. Sean Casey. Dr. Casey encouraged me and supported me from the time that I was a freshman all the way through my educational journey. Even when I didn’t believe in myself, he believed in me. He gave me opportunities to do research, nominated me for awards, and wrote letters of recommendation. I know his support was instrumental to my success. Now that I am a mentor to young adult students, I try to emulate his support and encouragement in my mentorship relationships.

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