Economics Graduate Student Handbook

Updated: April 2018

Program Description

Welcome to the Department of Economics at the University of Nevada, Reno. The Department offers a Master of Arts (MA) a Master of Science (MS) and a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Economics. For the MA and MS, both thesis and non-thesis options are available. These are described in more detail in the relevant sections below and the Economics Department website.

Department faculty promote the integration of economic theory and applied econometrics. The Economics department emphasizes an applied approach to economics. The MA emphasizes economic and public policy and is frequently complemented by course work in Geography, Political Science, and other disciplines. The MS emphasizes additional theoretical training in economics and is tailored for students seeking a terminal degree or a Ph.D. in Economics. The Ph.D. emphasizes applied economics, with specialties in Behavioral, Urban/Regional, Natural Resource/Environmental, and Applied Microeconomics, such as Health or Labor.

Student Learning Outcomes: Ph.D.

  • Students will demonstrate abstract modeling skills and analytical reasoning to analyze economics issues.
  • Students will apply quantitative techniques to economic theory.
  • Students will apply sound quantitative and econometric methods to analyze and summarize data, test hypotheses, and analyze economic issues.
  • Students will report research results using strong written and verbal communication skills.

Student Learning Outcomes: MA/MS

  • Students will understand key principles of advanced microeconomics and macroeconomics.
  • Students will demonstrate abstract modeling skills and analytical reasoning to analyze economics issues.
  • Students will identify correct econometric methods to analyze data, test hypotheses, and analyze economics issues.

For more information on specific program Student Learning Outcomes please visit the General

Catalog:

Graduate Director
Dr. Mark W. Nichols
Foundation Professor of Economics
Room 415 F, Ansari Business
mnichols@unr.edu
775 784 6936

Note: This handbook lists graduate program academic policies and procedures. It includes information on graduate school policies, degree requirements, timeline for degree completion, committee selection guidelines and comprehensive exam/thesis requirements. Every effort has been made to make this handbook accurate as of the date of publication; however, this handbook does not constitute a contractual commitment. Graduate programs may not offer all of the courses as described, and policies are subject to yearly review and changes with program director and Graduate Council approval.

Degree Requirements

PhD Program in Economics

PhD Residency Requirement

All PhD students must fulfill the Graduate School residency requirement, which requires two consecutive semesters of at least nine (9) graduate credits each. Students on 20 hr/week assistantships require six (6) credits each for two consecutive semesters.

Math Camp

New graduate students are required to participate in Math Camp, an intensive review/summary of the mathematics necessary for the Ph.D. core courses. Math Camp is held during the week prior to the start of classes each fall semester.

Curriculum for the PhD in Economics

72 total required credits:

  • Including max of 24 from Masters degree
  • Of these 72 credits, 30 must be 700-level credits, excluding dissertation credits; as many as 18 700-level credits may be used from a Masters degree program

The three categories of coursework for the Ph.D. in Economics are:

  • 6 core courses, 
  • 4 field courses, and
  • 6 or more elective courses.
Core Courses

Three two-course sequences comprise the Ph.D. core curriculum:

  • Microeconomic Theory I and II (ECON 702, ECON 712),
  • Macroeconomic Theory I and II (ECON 703, ECON 704), and
  • Econometrics I and II (ECON 741, ECON 742).

Students are expected to give their full attention to these core courses as they will take 2 comprehensive exams on microeconomic theory and macroeconomic theory to test knowledge of core course content at the end of their first year. These comprehensive exams are graded on a pass/fail basis.

Students are expected to take a total of 6 courses in their first year. These courses must include the 2 microeconomic theory courses, two macroeconomic theory courses, and two econometrics courses. Students should normally take all 6 Ph.D. core courses during their first year. Exceptions require approval of the Graduate Director.

Fields of Specialization

Students choose specializations in 2 fields from the following:

  • Applied Microeconomics
  • Behavioral Economics
  • Business Economics
  • Environmental and Resource Economics
  • Urban and Regional Economics

Each field consists of two 700-level courses, but these would typically be complemented by other courses from a list of recommended electives. In cases where the same course satisfies requirements of two fields, students are still required to take a minimum of four 700-level courses for their two fields.

Recommended electives listed for each field are not a comprehensive list of possible electives. Students may find that other elective graduate courses effectively complement their chosen fields. These must be approved by the student's advisor and Graduate Director.

Elective Courses

The 6 Ph.D. core courses and 4 field courses account for 30 700-level graduate credits. Students take 6 additional elective graduate courses (18 credits) to complete their course requirements. Elective courses are typically chosen in consultation with the student’s academic advisor to support the student’s doctoral research, to strengthen fields of specialization.

Students who are engaged in research applications that are related to other fields may find it helpful to take graduate courses in another field. These can be counted toward fulfilling the elective requirements as long as they are at the graduate level (600 or 700 level) and are approved by the student’s advisory committee. Find out more about approved electives for each field.

Comprehensive Exams

Students must be accepted into the Ph.D. program or receive permission from the graduate director in order to take the comprehensive exams. Ph.D. students are required to take the comprehensive exams in the first summer following the completion of the core microeconomic and macroeconomic theory courses. Failure to take the comprehensive exams at this time will be considered a Fail. Students failing one or both of the comprehensive exams in the summer will have only one additional opportunity to re-take the exam(s). Failure to pass both exams will result in dismissal from the Ph.D. program, although students are allowed and encouraged to complete their Masters.

Comprehensive exams are written and restricted to a four-hour time limit. They are generally given in the week prior to classes beginning.

Course work provides preparation for the comprehensive exams and success in future classes.

Additional studying, problem solving, and reading outside of course work is necessary to succeed in the comprehensive examinations and the program.

Master of Science and Master of Arts in Economics

Candidates for the MS or MA in Economics must satisfy the general requirements of the Graduate School. Courses should be selected to complement the student’s area of interest and enhance his/her conceptual and research skills. Two degree plans are available: Plan A is the non-thesis option (33 credits); Plan B (30 credits) requires a thesis.

Each candidate’s program of study must be approved by the student’s departmental advisor and the Director of Graduate Programs. Students must also meet all university and college requirements for the master’s degree.

Students who are considering a Ph.D. should select the MS Non-Thesis option. Masters students who wish to transfer into the Ph.D. program must have approval from the Graduate Director and must sit for the comprehensive exams in the first year.

Each graduate course must be completed with a grade of C or better for the credit to be acceptable toward the degree. Additionally, students in the program must maintain a 3.0 (B) or better cumulative grade point average in all graduate credits attempted at the University. Students have up to six (6) years to complete all requirements for their degree (including the period for the transfer credits). A template for obtaining the master’s degree in two (2) years is provided in this handbook under the heading “Roadmap to Completion.” Be advised that the six-year clock begins with the first course you apply toward the degree, i.e., any courses you transfer in. If credits are from another institution, the “Graduate Credit Transfer Evaluation Request” must be filed.

Math Camp

New graduate students are required to participate in Math Camp, an intensive review/summary of the mathematics necessary for the core courses. Math Camp is held during the week prior to the start of classes each fall semester. This is part of your credit for ECON 794.

Curriculum for the MS in Economics

Master of Science Course Requirements (Plan A: Non-Thesis Option, 34 credits)

Specific course requirements for the Master of Science in economics include:

  1. ECON 702 (Advanced Microeconomics)
  2. ECON 703 (Advanced Macroeconomics)
  3. ECON 704 (Advanced Macroeconomics II)
  4. ECON 712 ( Microeconomics II)
  5. ECON 741 (Econometrics I)
  6. ECON 742 (Econometrics II)
  7. Nine additional credits taken at the 700-level, subject to graduate advisor approval.
  8. Six additional credits taken at the 600 or 700-level, subject to graduate advisor approval.
  9. A total of at least 33 credits of graduate-level courses
  10. ECON 794 (Seminar) (1 credit)

Master of Science Course Requirements (Plan B: Thesis Option, 31 credits)

Specific course requirements for the Master of Science in economics include:

  1. ECON 702 (Advanced Microeconomics)
  2. ECON 703 (Advanced Macroeconomics)
  3. ECON 704 (Advanced Macroeconomics II)
  4. ECON 712 (Microeconomics II)
  5. ECON 741 (Econometrics I)
  6. ECON 742 (Econometrics II)
  7. Six additional credits of approved graduate courses, only three of which may be taken at the 600-level
  8. Six credits of thesis work
  9. A total of at least 24 credits of graduate-level courses ECON 794 (Seminar) (1- 3 credit)
Curriculum for the MA in Economics

Master of Arts Course Requirements (Plan A: Non-Thesis Option, 34 Credits)

Specific course requirements for the Master of Arts in economics include:

  1. ECON 702 (Advanced Microeconomics)
  2. ECON 703 (Advanced Macroeconomics)
  3. ECON 741 (Applied Econometrics) 
  4. ECON 794, Seminar, 1-3 credit(s)
  5. Nine additional credits taken at the 700-level.
  6. 15 additional elective credits at the 600-level or 700-level
  7. A total of at least 33 credits of graduate-level courses, subject to graduate advisor approval.

Master of Arts Course Requirements (Plan B: Thesis Option, 31 Credits)

Specific course requirements for the Master of Arts in economics include:

  1. ECON 702 (Advanced Microeconomics)
  2. ECON 703 (Advanced Macroeconomics)
  3. ECON 741 (Applied Econometrics)
  4. Nine additional credits taken at the 700-level.
  5. 6 additional elective credits at the 600-level or 700-level
  6. A total of at least 24 credits of graduate-level courses, subject to graduate advisor approval.
  7. Six credits of thesis work.
  8. ECON 794, Seminar, 1-3 credit(s).

Non-Thesis Option

The non-thesis option requires graduate students to complete a larger number of coursework credits. Non-economics electives must be approved by the graduate director.

Thesis

The thesis option for both the MA and MS requires approval of the graduate advisor. Six thesis credits may be counted towards the 30 required credits. Each candidate’s program of study must be approved by the student’s departmental advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies. Students must also meet all university and college requirements for the master’s degree.

Each student who opts to complete a thesis will need to enroll for a minimum of six hours of thesis credits. These credit hours are given a satisfactory or unsatisfactory (S/U) grade and should generally be taken over the course of two or more semesters. Graduate students should meet with their advisor prior to registering for thesis credits and gain a clear understanding of what is required to receive a passing (S) grade. In general, inadequate or lack of progress on a thesis will result in a non-passing (U) grade. Thesis credits may NOT be taken during the summer semester, except under special circumstances.

The thesis topic and the methodology are chosen by the student in consultation with the Advisor and Graduate Committee. Students should work closely with their Advisors and Graduate Committee members on their thesis research and the documentation of the thesis. For those involved in research dealing with human subjects, be informed that effective February 1, 2003, the University requires the completion of formal on-line training prior to obtaining the necessary authorization; details are available on the UNR Office of Human Research Protection website.

Students will present and defend their thesis to their Advisor and Graduate Committee. Typically, the thesis defense is a formal presentation of about an hour, including questions and answers, and this is open to the public.

When a thesis is successfully defended, the “Notice of Completion” must be filled out and turned into the Department’s Graduate Director. The “Notice of Completion” form must be submitted to the Graduate School by mid-December for Fall semester graduation, and by mid-May for Spring semester graduation (check the Graduate School website for exact dates).

The approved thesis must be sent to the Graduate School. Deadlines for thesis submission are the same as those for the “Notice of Completion.” It is recommended that each student makes an appointment at the Graduate School to check the necessary format and style before handing in a final thesis. Further information about thesis preparation can be found on the Graduate School website.

Graduate School Academic Requirements

All graduate students must maintain a cumulative graduate GPA of 3.0. If their GPA drops below 3.0 they are either placed on probation or dismissed. Undergraduate courses will not count towards the graduate GPA.

Probation

Students whose cumulative graduate GPA is .1 to .6 points below that needed for a 3.0 GPA are put on probation. Students are placed on academic probation for one semester. If they fail to raise their cumulative GPA to 3.0 by the end of one semester, they are dismissed from their graduate program. Thesis, dissertation, S/U graded credits, and transfer credits have no impact on a student’s GPA.

Dismissal

Students whose cumulative graduate GPA is .7 or more grade points below that needed for a 3.0 GPA are dismissed. Dismissed students are no longer in a graduate program but may take graduate-level courses as a Grad Special. Students wishing to complete their degree must obtain approval to take graduate-level courses, raise their graduate GPA to at least 3.0 and then re-apply to a graduate program. Any courses taken to raise their GPA will be included in the graduate special/ transfer credit limitation (9 credits for master’s degrees).

Transfer Credits

These are credits transferred from another institution. Credits completed at UNR in another program or as a graduate special do not need to be transferred. Transfer credit is requested on the Graduate Credit Transfer Evaluation Request form available on Graduate School website and must be signed by the student, major advisor, and graduate director. Transfer credits applied to a master’s program must comply with the time limitation on master’s work (6 years). Thus, if a student took a course five years prior to admission, they would have to complete the degree within one year for the course to apply to the degree. Credits from a completed master’s degree will be exempt from the 8-year time limitation for those students earning a doctoral degree.

Timeline for Degree Completion

Ph.D. Roadmap to Completion

To help students plan for completing their degree, we present a possible timeline for the PhD. This simply illustrates how all program requirements could be satisfied in a timely manner.

1st Year

Focus on core micro, macro, and econometrics courses and comprehensive exams. Previous year exams are posted

2nd Year

Upon passing comprehensive exams, formulate research agenda. Two faculty from the economics department should validate and approve proposed research agenda, which will be defended as a formal proposal no later than the third year.

Present research in brown bag seminar. This should be done in the Spring of the second year.

Formulate remainder of dissertation committee. Committee consists of three members from the economics department, one member from a related department, and one external member. Your committee chair can help you with the formulation of your committee.

  • Graduate School Forms to be Completed

Complete the Declaration of Advisor/Major Advisor/ form available online.

3rd Year

Complete a research paper by October so as not to be at a disadvantage when applying for jobs in your fourth year. Ideally submit paper for publication in “B+” journal, subject to advisor approval.

Present research at an academic conference. Department funding for academic conferences is based on the suitability of your research and the conference. A student may apply for funding from the Graduate Student Association. Conference selection must be approved by your advisor and the department chair.

Defend dissertation proposal no later than December of your third year. Proposal defense should be made to the entire committee.

Graduate School Forms to be Completed

4th Year

A chapter of your dissertation should be submitted for publication to an academic journal and ideally published or under revision for submission.

Second chapter should be near completion and ready for presentation.

Present your job market paper in the department seminar series. This should be done early in the Fall semester (September or October) before going on the job market.

Defend dissertation by Spring. Dissertation chapters should be publishable in academic journals.

Graduate School Forms to be Completed

5th Year

Funding and extension of above guidelines subject to adequate progress and approval of the department’s graduate committee in consultation with committee chair.

MS/MA Roadmap to Completion

MS/MA Economics Plan A (Non-thesis option)

First (Fall) semester:

  • Enroll in core theory courses (ECON 702, 703, 741), ECON 794 (Seminar) 1-3 Unit(s)

Second (Spring) semester:

  • MS: Enroll in core theory courses (ECON 704, 712, 742)
  • MA: Select elective courses (non-ECON classes require Graduate Director approval)

Third (Fall) semester:

  • Select elective courses (non-ECON classes require Graduate Director approval)
  • Complete the Program of Study form and submit form to Grad School

Fourth (Spring) semester:

MS/MA Economics Plan B (Thesis option)

First (Fall) semester

  • Enroll in core theory courses (ECON 702, 703, 741)
  • Enroll in ECON 794 Seminar (1-3 Unit[s])

Second (Spring) semester:

  • MS: Enroll in core theory courses (ECON 704, 712, 742)
  • MA: Select elective courses (non-ECON classes require Graduate Director approval)
  • Select Thesis Topic
  • Complete the Declaration of Advisor/Major Advisor form

Third (Fall) semester:

  • Select elective courses (non-ECON classes require Graduate Director approval)
  • Complete the Program of Study form and submit form to Grad School

Fourth (Spring) semester:

Master’s degrees: All course work must be completed within six years preceding the awarding of the degree.

Doctoral degrees: All course work must be completed within eight years preceding the awarding of the degree. Credits transferred into doctoral degree from a completed master’s degree are exempt from this eight-year limit.

Committee selection guideline

The PhD graduate committee consists of at least five members of the graduate faculty, including your Advisor. Your Advisor should be the primary Department contact for information, guidance and mentoring throughout a student's graduate studies. It is the student's responsibility to contact his/her Advisor about appropriate coursework, research questions, and selection of a graduate committee. In addition to the permanent advisor as chair, the committee is composed of two or more members from Economics; one or more members from departments in related fields; and, one member outside Economics, who is the Graduate School Representative. You should work with your advisor when selecting the committee. This should be done in your second year after passing the comprehensive examinations.

The Masters graduate committee consists of at least three members of the graduate faculty, including your Advisor. Your Advisor should be the primary Department contact for information, guidance and mentoring throughout a student's graduate studies. It is the student's responsibility to contact his/her Advisor about appropriate coursework, research questions, and selection of a graduate committee. In addition to the permanent advisor as chair, the committee is composed of one additional member from Economics and one member outside Economics, who is the Graduate School Representative. You should work with your advisor when selecting the committee. This should be done in your second semester.

Master’s Programs: All master’s programs (with a few exceptions for course-only degrees)require at least three advisory committee members. All must be graduate faculty members. At least one (the graduate school representative or “outside” member) must be from a department or program different from the department or program from which the student is graduating. Doctoral Programs: Consist of a minimum of five graduate faculty members; the chair, at least two faculty members from the student’s major department/program, at least one faculty member from a department in a field related to the student’s major, and at least one Graduate School representative.

In case of interdisciplinary graduate programs, the Graduate School Representative cannot have a primary appointment in the same department (or other appropriate major unit) as the student's committee chair.

Formal approval of all student advisory committees is made by the Graduate Dean.

Comprehensive exams

Students must be accepted into the Ph.D. program or receive permission from the graduate director in order to take the comprehensive exams. Ph.D. students are required to take the comprehensive exams in the first summer following the completion of the core microeconomic and macroeconomic theory courses. These exams are pass/fail. Failure to take the comprehensive exams at this time will be considered a Fail. Students failing one or both of the comprehensive exams in the summer will have only one additional opportunity to re-take the exam(s). Failure to pass both exams will result in dismissal from the Ph.D. program, although students are allowed and encouraged to complete their Masters. Each exam is graded by a committee of at least two professors and the graduate director. To pass, students must demonstrate mastery of the concepts covered in the exams as judged by this committee.

Comprehensive exams are written and restricted to a four-hour time limit. They are generally given in June and August.

Course work provides preparation for the comprehensive exams and success in future classes. Additional studying, problem solving, and reading outside of course work is necessary to succeed in the comprehensive examinations and the program. This is the responsibility of the student and assistance from faculty should not be expected.

Dissertation and Thesis Requirements

Dissertation

Each PhD student will need to enroll for a minimum of 24 hours of dissertation credits. These credit hours are given a satisfactory or unsatisfactory (S/U) grade. Graduate students should meet with their advisor prior to registering for dissertation credits and gain a clear understanding of what is required to receive a passing (S) grade. In general, inadequate or lack of progress on a dissertation will result in a non-passing (U) grade. Dissertation credits may NOT be taken during the summer semester, except under special circumstances.

The dissertation topic and the methodology are chosen by the student in consultation with the Advisor and Graduate Committee. Students should work closely with their Advisors and Graduate Committee members on their dissertation research and the documentation of the dissertation. For those involved in research dealing with human subjects, be informed that effective February 1, 2003, the University requires the completion of formal on-line training prior to obtaining the necessary authorization. Details are available on the UNR Office of Human Research Protection website.

The dissertation consists of publication-ready articles or book chapters (typically three [3]), interconnected by a single overriding theme.

Students will present and defend their dissertation to their Advisor and Graduate Committee. The dissertation defense is a formal presentation of about an hour and half, including questions and answers, and this is open to the public.

Thesis

Each Masters student will need to enroll for a minimum of 6 hours of thesis credits. These credit hours are given a satisfactory or unsatisfactory (S/U) grade. Graduate students should meet with their advisor prior to registering for thesis credits and gain a clear understanding of what is required to receive a passing (S) grade.

Graduate School Forms to be Completed

Graduate School forms and resources related to thesis and dissertations:

Students need to submit a Final Review Approval and Notice of Completion form in order to graduate.

Final Review Approval – Obtain sign-off from advisory committee chair

Notice of completion – completed form should be submitted after all requirements have been met.

Graduate Assistantships

Graduate student funding is a privilege, not a right. Continuation of funding is contingent upon satisfactory performance as a graduate assistant and in course work. Failure to perform satisfactorily as either a graduate assistant or in course work will result in a loss of funding. Failure to enroll in the 6 core theory courses in the first year (ECON 702, 703, and 741 in Fall; ECON 704, 712, and 742 in Spring) will result in loss of funding unless an exception has been granted by the Graduate Director.

All new graduate teaching applicants and assistants will need to meet the University and Department requirements for Teaching Assistants, and these may change from time to time . Prospective students should consult with the graduate advisor when applying for admission. Current students should consult the graduate advisor before the beginning of the semester.

All teaching assistants must register for GRAD 701 (no credit) and attend the TA training workshop, run by the Grad School, the week prior to the start of their first semester as a TA.

Teaching assistants will report directly to the course instructor to whom they are assigned. Their responsibilities to assist the course instructor may include, but are not limited to, the following tasks:

  • Attending class and assisting, as needed, with distributing materials, setting up and operating audiovisual equipment;
  • conducting discussion groups;
  • directing student study sessions;
  • assisting in the development of lectures, assignments, quizzes, examinations and laboratories and/or discussion groups; • proctoring examinations;
  • grading of class assignments, quizzes and examinations;
  • giving short presentations to the class, under supervision by the course instructor.

It is recommended that all graduate teaching assistants post their office hours in the hallway near their office door. TAs must take a minimum of six (6) credits per semester – on the other hand, they are limited to a maximum of twelve (12) credits per semester.

All graduate students holding an assistantship (teaching GTA or GRA) are considered Nevada residents for tuition purposes. Non-resident tuition is only waived for the duration of the assistantship. To be eligible for an assistantship, students must be admitted to a degree-granting program and be in good academic standing. The student must have an overall GPA of at least 3.0 and must be continuously enrolled in at least 6 graduate level credits (600-700) throughout the duration of the assistantship. State-funded assistantships (GTA/GRA) may be held for a maximum of: three (3) years for master’s degree students and five (5) years for doctoral degree students.

Other useful information about graduate assistantships may be found on the Graduate School website.

Graduate Student Expectations

Ethics

Academic dishonesty of any kind will not be tolerated. Cheating in class or plagiarizing, presenting the ideas of others as your own or without proper citation, will not be tolerated. Anyone discovered cheating or plagiarizing will be dismissed from the program.

Department Participation

Ph.D. students are expected to participate in the research culture of the department. We expect 80% attendance at department seminars, which are provided for the benefit of students as much as faculty. Failure to comply may result in removal of funding and dismissal from the program.

Health insurance

All domestic degree seeking graduate students, who are enrolled in six or more credits (regardless of the course level) in a semester, will be automatically enrolled and billed for the University sponsored health insurance for each term they are eligible (fall & spring/summer). If a student has other comparable coverage and would like to waive out of the student health insurance, it is the student’s responsibility to complete the University online waiver form prior to the deadline. If approved, a health insurance waiver is good for the current academic year only. A new waiver must be submitted each academic year. All international graduate students are required to carry student health insurance, and the cost will be automatically added to your student account. Any international graduate students with insurance questions must contact the Office of International Students and Scholars (OISS) directly.

Leave of Absence

Continuous Enrollment:

To maintain “good standing” all graduate students are required to enroll in a minimum of three (3) graduate credits each fall and spring semester until they graduate. International students may be required to enroll in nine graduate credits each fall and spring semester depending on the requirements of their visa. All students holding assistantships (whether teaching or research assistantships) are required to enroll in a minimum of six (6) graduate credits each semester they hold the assistantship.

Leave of Absence:

Students in good standing may request a leave of absence by completing a leave of absence form available on the Graduate School website during which time they are not required to maintain continuous registration. Usually, a leave of absence is approved for one or two semesters. The leave of absence request may be extended by the student filing an additional leave of absence form. Students applying for a leave of absence should not have any “incomplete” grades which could be changed to “F” and have a detrimental impact on their cumulative GPA. Requests for leave of absences must be received by the Graduate School no later than the last day of enrollment for the semester the leave is to begin.

Reinstatement:

When a student has been absent for one semester or more without an approved leave of absence, he or she may request reinstatement via the Reinstatement form available on the Graduate School website. This form allows the program the option to recommend the student be re-admitted to their graduate program based on their previous admission OR require the student to re-apply for admission which would require students to submit a new application for admission and pay the application fee. The Notice of Reinstatement to Gradate Standing must be received by the Graduate School no later than the last day of enrollment for the semester the reinstatement is to begin.

Graduate Student Association

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) represents all graduate students and promotes the welfare and interests of the graduate students at the University of Nevada, Reno. The GSA works closely with appropriate university administrative offices, including the Graduate School and Student Services and reports to the President of the University. The GSA government functions through the Council of Representatives, Executive Council and established committees.

Graduate School Forms

All forms available at The Graduate School website.

Other Useful Information