7 faculty members receive CAREER Awards in support of early-career success

With the latest round of this prestigious NSF award, the University’s community of faculty-recipients grows

Collage of the individual photos of the University's seven CAREER Awardees for 2022.

The University’s 2022 CAREER awardees (clockwise from upper left): The 2022 awardees are: Engin Arslan, Kelly Cross, Tin Nguyen, Jenny Ouyang, Elizabeth Pringle, Hao Xu and Yufeng Zheng.

7 faculty members receive CAREER Awards in support of early-career success

With the latest round of this prestigious NSF award, the University’s community of faculty-recipients grows

The University’s 2022 CAREER awardees (clockwise from upper left): The 2022 awardees are: Engin Arslan, Kelly Cross, Tin Nguyen, Jenny Ouyang, Elizabeth Pringle, Hao Xu and Yufeng Zheng.

Collage of the individual photos of the University's seven CAREER Awardees for 2022.

The University’s 2022 CAREER awardees (clockwise from upper left): The 2022 awardees are: Engin Arslan, Kelly Cross, Tin Nguyen, Jenny Ouyang, Elizabeth Pringle, Hao Xu and Yufeng Zheng.

Seven University of Nevada, Reno faculty members have received a 2022 CAREER Award. This latest cohort follows the eight awards received by faculty in 2021, the most ever in a single year at the University.

These National Science Foundation (NSF) awards recognize role models in research and education with the potential to lead advances in their field and within their university. The five-year awards provide a foundation for their future career and research development.

As the NSF describes it, “This premier program emphasizes the importance the Foundation places on the early development of academic careers dedicated to stimulating the discovery process in which the excitement of research is enhanced by inspired teaching, enthusiastic learning and disseminating new knowledge.”

The 2022 awardees are:

  • Engin Arslan, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering, College of Engineering, for work to address scalability and reliability with existing data transfer applications.
  • Kelly Cross, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical & Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, for work to gauge perceptions of faculty in engineering fields on diversity, equity and inclusion, and to develop a gaming platform to help faculty navigate DEI issues.
  • Tin Nguyen, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering, College of Engineering, for work to develop new machine learning techniques and advance the use of molecular and biological data to better diagnose the progression of cancer.
  • Jenny Ouyang, associate professor in the Department of Biology, College of Science, for work to investigate how artificial night light affects the health and behavior of wild birds.
  • Elizabeth Pringle, assistant professor in the Department of Biology, College of Science, for work to determine how drought impacts what is termed the “phytochemical landscape” of plants.
  • Hao Xu, associate professor in the Department of Electrical & Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, for work to advance large-scale, multi-agent systems through the application of game theory, artificial intelligence and machine learning.
  • Yufeng Zheng, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical & Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, for work to design novel titanium alloys with both high strength and ductility, while also advancing electron microscopy education for University students.

Research & Proposal Development Services, part of Research & Innovation, assists in the development of CAREER proposals, including brokering connections to community partners to improve broader impacts and education plans. Personalized support for CAREER proposals includes multiple rounds of conceptual and technical editing, external review, timeline management and one-on-one consultations.

“We provide training and support to all faculty launching an independent research career, and we continue that support through specialized programs that enhance submissions for highly competitive awards, like the CAREER,” said Kate Dunkelberger, proposal editor. “Our goal is to partner with our researchers to facilitate the thoughtful planning and outstanding communication required to achieve such a major accolade.”

“The CAREER Award recognizes the recipients’ early-career success and their potential … what they can do for their discipline, the scientific community and the nation,” said Mridul Gautam, University vice president for research and innovation. “It is wonderful to see the increasing notice of our early-career faculty through this prestigious NSF program.”

“The CAREER Award is only a beginning,” Gautam said. “Our past awardees are demonstrating what this program is about. They are doing very well and making strong research and education contributions.”

“The CAREER Award is one of the most eminent honors for a researcher in that it recognizes early-career faculty who integrate teaching and outreach with their research,” University President Brian Sandoval said. “Through their contributions and work, these faculty members are fulfilling the land-grant mission and making an important difference for our students and our state.”

Forty-nine CAREER Awards have been awarded to University of Nevada, Reno faculty since 1996. This includes 25 CAREER Awards over the last five years.