Preparing to teach

In fall 2020 faculty will be teaching courses across a variety of modes of instruction as indicated in MyNevada. Since most faculty are new to HyFlex instruction, and perhaps to online instruction, we provide a brief overview of these modalities and instructional strategies at the links below.

Preparing to teach HyFlex courses

Preparing to teach online courses

For more detailed discussion of methods and technologies for teaching HyFlex and online courses, please refer to the “Preparing for Fall 2020” resource course.

Preparing for Fall 2020 resource course

The "Preparing for Fall 2020" resource course should now be visible on your WebCampus dashboard. If you are unable to see the course in WebCampus, or are not scheduled to teach in summer or fall 2020 but would like access to the resources, please contact IDT to be added to the course.

 

Preparing to teach HyFlex courses

Courses that are listed as “Alternative HyFlex” in MyNevada may also be referred to as “mixed-modality” or “mixed-delivery” and will include a combination of face-to-face and online instruction in fall 2020. Faculty will divide students into two groups and assign each group to alternate between in-class and online attendance. On online attendance dates, students will be required to attend class virtually, either synchronously via Zoom, or asynchronously in a manner determined by the instructor. Classrooms will be outfitted with audio-visual equipment that will allow faculty to live-stream lectures to students attending virtually via Zoom. The technology will also allow faculty to record lectures and save them on WebCampus (with captioning) for later viewing by students. Faculty expectations for student attendance in face-to-face and virtual forms should be communicated to students before or at the start of the term, and ideally this information will be stated in the course syllabus. Fully remote or fully face-to-face student participation may also need to be accommodated, based on formal student requests.

We encourage faculty to prepare for HyFlex/mixed-delivery instruction as though they will be teaching a fully online course. We recommend you begin to prepare by creating a plan for your course and instruction. Next build out the WebCampus portion of your course, as much as possible before the semester begins. Lastly, determine the best use of face-to-face time. By preparing the online portion of your course from the outset, you will create the backbone of a course that can potentially reach all students, and that can quickly pivot to fully online if deemed necessary by the University.

Two general strategies for HyFlex/mixed-delivery instruction are outlined below, but you may decide on some combination of the two or otherwise modify these strategies to suit your instructional needs.

Strategy A: Blended traditional

You primarily use your in-class/Zoom sessions to lecture or deliver content, though you may include some student engagement in class meetings with polling, leaving time for student questions, etc. Student engagement in the form of discussions and other learning activities will primarily take place asynchronously (outside of class time) and online (e.g., on a discussion board).

Given the limitations of social distancing we anticipate this will be the most popular strategy in fall 2020.

Strategy B: Blended flipped

You primarily use in-class/Zoom sessions to engage students in discussion of difficult or challenging concepts, knowledge application activities, and/or collaborative learning activities or experiences (problem solving, group work, community service, etc.). Your planning will need to include engagement of students attending both in-class and online. Lecture and content will be delivered asynchronously online for students to review before class time (i.e., in the form of video and readings, typically with an associated preparation assignment or quiz). Additional activities may also take place asynchronously online outside of class time.

Given the limitations of social distancing we anticipate that active learning in a f2f class will be more challenging than usual in fall 2020.

Please refer to the TLT WebCampus course, “Preparing for Fall 2020” for more in-depth resources to support your design and delivery of a HyFlex/mixed-delivery course.

 

Preparing to teach online courses

Courses that are listed as fully online in MyNevada will take place virtually, with no required campus attendance. Courses may function asynchronously (with all lecture and activities provided online with no real-time interaction required) and/or synchronously (with live, scheduled Zoom sessions), or a blend of the two. All course work will be submitted online, and all interaction between students and instructors will take place online. One important consideration for fully online courses only is that student identity will need to be verified.

Three general strategies for an online teaching scenario are outlined below, but you may decide on some combination of the two, or otherwise modify these strategies to suit your course.

Strategy A: Blended traditional

You primarily use your synchronous Zoom sessions to lecture or deliver content. You may include some student engagement in Zoom sessions using polling or allowing time for student questions or brief discussions. Most student discussions and other learning activities will primarily take place asynchronously (outside of class time), and online (e.g., on a WebCampus discussion board).

Strategy B: Blended flipped

Students primarily engage in synchronous Zoom/in class time used for discussion of challenging content, application activities, active and collaborative learning, and formative assessment. You mostly deliver content asynchronously before class in the form of videos and readings. You may include additional student engagement outside of class time and online (e.g., asking students to collaborate on a Google Doc).

Strategy C: All asynchronous

You design all content delivery and activities for online, and you do not require they be accessed at a specific time. Student learning is typically structured by setting deadlines for activities throughout the week to guide student interaction with content and each other.

Please refer to the TLT WebCampus course, “Preparing for Fall 2020” for more in-depth resources to support your design and delivery of an online course.