Core Writing Course Descriptions

English 100I: Composition Intensive (3 credits plus 2 credits of labs)

In 100I, be prepared to explore rhetorical processes, emphasizing audience, purpose and occasion of writing. You will learn how to adapt your writing in different genres for different audiences. You will also receive an extensive background in strategies of planning, drafting and revising.

In order to provide extra support to help you master those processes, English 100I pairs with two small labs (100L and 105L, with eight students in each section) run out of the University Writing and Speaking Center that provide personalized attention to help you successfully transition into college writing. One lab focuses on building writing skills and the other focuses on building reading skills.

Note: English 100I is equivalent to English 101 and those who pass ENG 100I move directly into ENG 102.

English 101: College Composition I (3 credits)

In 101, be prepared to explore rhetorical processes, emphasizing audience, purpose and occasion of writing. You will learn how to adapt your writing in different genres for different audiences. You will also receive an extensive background in strategies of planning, drafting and revising.

English 101 does not include the extra support provided by the labs in English 100I.

English 113: College Composition I for International and Multilingual Students (3 credits)

English 113 is similar to English 101 and students can choose to go on to English 114 (Composition II for International and Multilingual Students) or into English 102 after completing the course.

What is unique about English 113 is that it is taught by an instructor with training in working with speakers of English as a second or additional language, so you can receive more tailored feedback on the linguistic aspects of your writing as you build your confidence in writing in different genres.

English 102: College Composition II (3 credits)

English 102 builds on foundational writing habits provided in our earlier courses and asks students to engage with contemporary rhetorical situations or problems by immersing themselves in the research practices, methods of analysis and genres of writing necessary for engaged discussion in a public conversation. Students are introduced to ongoing debates through various perspectives, including scholarly, public and popular genres, in order to map rhetorical conversations.

Please note that most sections of English 102 are offered in spring semester—if you have already completed English 101 or have otherwise placed into English 102 before the fall semester, you will likely need to wait until the spring semester to complete English 102.

Learning outcomes for 100I, 101 and 113

English 100I, 101, and 113 share the same learning outcomes (note: these are pilot outcomes that may differ from those posted elsewhere):

  1. Use reflection and feedback from others to reconsider prior knowledge about writing and construct new knowledge about writing (CO1)
  2. Identify features of rhetorical situations (e.g., audience, subject, composer, context, constraints, exigence, genre, and medium) (CO1)
  3. Create purpose-driven texts that respond to a variety of rhetorical situations and that anticipate and adapt to the needs of different readers (CO1)
  4. Apply critical reading practices, such as annotation, analysis and discussion, to draw on and integrate a variety of sources including first-hand experience, relevant perspectives, and expert voices when composing (CO3)
  5. Employ flexible strategies for drafting, reviewing, revising, rewriting, and editing (CO1)
  6. Recognize and understand the value of different languages and dialects of English (CO10)
  7. Use spelling, grammar, style and punctuation conventions that meet genre and audience-based expectations (CO1)

Learning outcomes for 102

Here are the learning outcomes for 102 (note: these are pilot outcomes that may differ from those posted elsewhere):

  1. Use reflection and feedback from others to reconsider prior knowledge about writing and construct new knowledge about writing (CO1)
  2. Engage in responsible, systematic research practices informed by critical reading and rhetorical analysis, including locating and evaluating a range of materials (CO3)
  3. Through research and advocacy, produce coherent, well-supported arguments in response to an ongoing public conversation (CO3)
  4. Show evidence of the ability to synthesize, use fairly, and credit the ideas of others using appropriate citation style (CO1)
  5. Develop facility in adapting an argument to diverse audiences and different rhetorical contexts (CO1)
  6. Demonstrate developing knowledge of how conventions, genre, audience, purpose, medium, context, and personal identity help shape a reader’s expectations of and response to a text (CO1)