Virtual coding workshops prepare students for Congressional App Challenge

Extension 4-H Program encourages students to explore computer science

Screenshot of zoom workshop with Congresswoman Dina Titus and Extension's Mallory Levins, Nora Luna, Sarah Monique Somma and Ivory Lyles

Congresswoman Dina Titus addresses students via zoom at the Aug. 6 “Intro to Coding for the Congressional App Challenge” workshop. The next workshops are Sept. 2 for middle school students and Sept. 3 for high school students. Photo by Sheila Bray, Extension.

Virtual coding workshops prepare students for Congressional App Challenge

Extension 4-H Program encourages students to explore computer science

Congresswoman Dina Titus addresses students via zoom at the Aug. 6 “Intro to Coding for the Congressional App Challenge” workshop. The next workshops are Sept. 2 for middle school students and Sept. 3 for high school students. Photo by Sheila Bray, Extension.

Screenshot of zoom workshop with Congresswoman Dina Titus and Extension's Mallory Levins, Nora Luna, Sarah Monique Somma and Ivory Lyles

Congresswoman Dina Titus addresses students via zoom at the Aug. 6 “Intro to Coding for the Congressional App Challenge” workshop. The next workshops are Sept. 2 for middle school students and Sept. 3 for high school students. Photo by Sheila Bray, Extension.

App creation is one of the fastest-growing industries related to computer science, with over 5,000 apps being added to app stores and play stores daily. In addition, demand for coding skills remains high in several industries. Extension’s 4-H Youth Development Program in Clark County encourages youth in middle school and high school to give coding a try through the “Intro to Coding for the Congressional App Challenge” workshop.

These workshops will prepare youth to participate in the Congressional App Challenge, a series of regional competitions hosted by the U.S. House of Representatives to encourage students to learn to code and inspire them to pursue careers in computer science. Participants in the workshop will hear from congressional representatives, including Congresswoman Dina Titus, Congressman Steven Horsford and Congresswoman Susie Lee.

Representatives Titus, Horsford and Lee issued this statement about this year's event: “Though this year’s Congressional App Challenge may look different, we are inspired by all the students who are adapting to the new challenges we are facing. The Congressional App Challenge is one of the most prestigious prizes awarded to students in computer science and it is a privilege to host the competition again this year.”

The workshop for middle school students is 4-5 p.m., Sept. 2, and the workshop for high school students is 4-5 p.m., Sept. 3. Extension also offered the same workshop on Aug. 6. Participants will:

  • learn more about the Congressional App Challenge and what it will take to create a submission;
  • experience a facilitated brainstorm session to identify a societal problem to be addressed through app development;
  • receive information on various free open-source app creation platforms; and
  • practice within one app creation platform to begin the process of developing their own app.

“In developing their apps, youth are encouraged to create something that solves a problem, such as one that may affect themselves, someone they care about, society, the economy or the environment,” Mallory Levins, civic engagement coordinator for 4-H in Clark County, said.

Space is limited, so students should preregister online as soon as possible.

For more information, email Levins.

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