GAANN Fellow Michael Lam

"Climate change is very real, and its implications on human health and survival, a most worthy reason for us to integrate all our knowledge and resources to ensure a happy, sustainable future for team Earth."

Michael Lam

Lam is one of the first Fellows in the GAANN (Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need) PhD Program, sponsored by the Department of Education.

GAANN Fellow Michael Lam

"Climate change is very real, and its implications on human health and survival, a most worthy reason for us to integrate all our knowledge and resources to ensure a happy, sustainable future for team Earth."

Lam is one of the first Fellows in the GAANN (Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need) PhD Program, sponsored by the Department of Education.

Michael Lam

Lam is one of the first Fellows in the GAANN (Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need) PhD Program, sponsored by the Department of Education.

Originally From: New York, New York 
Fellowship Start Date: Fall 2020
Research Subdiscipline: Environmental Engineering
Research Advisor Dr. Frank Yang

What inspired you to pursue a PhD?

The topic of environmental disasters is one that is near and dear to me. Roughly seven years ago, my siblings and I were sitting close with my mom in a school building waiting for updates on Hurricane Sandy. We stayed at the evacuation site for five days, dozing off in hallway bunkers in plain view of hoards of other strangers. The risk of losing homes and having to lose out on work and pay is an obvious point of concern for many. Climate change is very real, and its implications on human health and survival, a most worthy reason for us to integrate all our knowledge and resources to ensure a happy, sustainable future for team Earth. Applications in engineering has been vital to advancing the stretch of human civilization, from building urban and suburban environments to designing utility systems to fit human needs.

What are you most interested in learning more about during your PhD study?

In particular, I am interested in water resources, including municipal water treatment and stormwater management. I resided in the Binghamton (NY) area for the past six years, and I have heard the 2006 and 2011 floods of the Chenango and Susquehanna River brought up various times by professors and local townspeople. Floodwaters can take months to recede, all the while providing a medium for the spread of pollutants and diseases. It is for the preservation of a healthy human-environment ecosystem that I want to improve the effectiveness of water management systems. I want to investigate various water treatment processes and find new ways to store, treat, and repurpose contaminated water.

What do you like to do in your spare time?

In my spare time, I like to garden and play badminton.

Latest From

Nevada Today