CCID toolkit

  • Online writing tools
    • The Purdue Owl: This is hands-down the most fully-developed online writing resource there is. It has documentation styles, mechanics, disciplinary writing resources and much more.
    • "No One Writes Alone: Peer Review in the Classroom:" This MIT video has been around for a while, but it is one of the best resources to explain/illustrate not only what productive peer review looks like but why it is so important.
    • "Becoming an Ally: Tutoring Multilingual Writers:" This is a wonderful series of short videos on how to work with student writers whose first language is not English. The videos illustrate a process that students can relate to and that faculty can use in their own practice as educators.
    • "Why is Business Writing So Bad?:" While this video is focused on business writing, the three reasons outlined here are ubiquitous to writing in many other areas of writing, as well.
    • "The Science of Scientific Writing:" This is a great and relatively brief paper on rhetorical moves that can help scientific writing (and other kinds, as well) to be more effective and successful. Worth reading for anyone working with writers and complex subject matter or with writers making subject matter more complicated than it needs to be.
    • "Assigning More Writing-With Less Grading:" These strategies work at almost any level, and they get students in the habit of using writing as a means (to learn) without seeing it exclusively as an end (grades). This helps them to use writing more effectively and it helps faculty to facilitate learning without being overwhelmed with grading.
  • Online presentation tools
    • The Purdue Owl: This is hands-down the most fully-developed online writing resource there is. It has documentation styles, mechanics, disciplinary writing resources and much more.
    • "No One Writes Alone: Peer Review in the Classroom:" This MIT video has been around for a while, but it is one of the best resources to explain/illustrate not only what productive peer review looks like but why it is so important.
    • "Becoming an Ally: Tutoring Multilingual Writers:" This is a wonderful series of short videos on how to work with student writers whose first language is not English. The videos illustrate a process that students can relate to and that faculty can use in their own practice as educators.
    • "Why is Business Writing So Bad?:" While this video is focused on business writing, the three reasons outlined here are ubiquitous to writing in many other areas of writing, as well.
    • "The Science of Scientific Writing:" This is a great and relatively brief paper on rhetorical moves that can help scientific writing (and other kinds, as well) to be more effective and successful. Worth reading for anyone working with writers and complex subject matter or with writers making subject matter more complicated than it needs to be.
    • "Assigning More Writing-With Less Grading:" These strategies work at almost any level, and they get students in the habit of using writing as a means (to learn) without seeing it exclusively as an end (grades). This helps them to use writing more effectively and it helps faculty to facilitate learning without being overwhelmed with grading.
  • Other online resources
    • "The Critical Thinking Initiative" podcasts via iTunes: These are great, brief podcasts that take up issues of teaching critical thinking, dispel myths via research, and offer options that transcend discipline. For those who are working to get students to engage more deeply with their reading and learning, these podcasts are extremely helpful.
    • "Assessment Resources:" Duke University/Trinity College of Arts & Sciences provides a nice selection of assessment resources and options that can be applied and/or adapted to almost any department or assessment project. These resources are not one-size-fits-all, but they provide a wide range of options that can inform department and course-level assessment for most faculty and assessment committees.
  • Books on teaching writing
    • Challenge, L. E. A. P. (2015). Education for a World of Unscripted Problems. (AAC&U).
    • Gottschalk, K. K., & Hjortshoj, K. (2004). The elements of teaching writing: A resource for instructors in all disciplines. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's.
    • Graff, G., & Birkenstein, C. (2017). "They say / I say": The moves that matter in academic writing. (2012).
    • Hedengren, B. F. (2004). A TA's guide to teaching writing in all disciplines. Boston: Bedford St. Martin's.
    • MCPHEE, J. (2018). DRAFT NO. 4: on the writing process. S.l.: FARRAR, STRAUS & GIROUX.
    • Williams, J. M., & Bizup, J. (2015). Style: The Basics of clarity and grace. 5th ed. Pearson.
  • Books for academic writing
    • Bane, R. (2012). Around the writer's block: Using brain science to solve writer's resistance. New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher/Penguin.
    • Belcher, W. L. (2014). Writing your journal article in 12 weeks: A guide to academic publishing success. Los Angeles: Sage.Boice, R. (1990). Professors as writers: A self-help guide to productive writing.
    • Germano, W. (2013). From dissertation to book. Chicago, Ill. [u.a.: University of Chicago Press.
    • Goodson, P. (2017). Becoming an academic writer: 50 exercises for paced, productive, and powerful writing.
    • Jensen, J. (2017). Write no matter what: Advice for academics.
    • Johnson, W. B., & Mullen, C. A. (2008). Write to the top: How to become a prolific academic. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
    • Luey, B. (2012). Handbook for academic authors. New York: Cambridge University Press.Sword, H. (2017). Air & light & time & space how successful academics write. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
    • Silvia, P. J. (2014). How to write a lot: A practical guide to productive academic writing. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
    • Staw, J. A. (2013). Unstuck: A supportive and practical guide to working through writer's block. New York: St. Martin's Press.
    • Sword, H. (2017). Air & light & time & space how successful academics write. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
    • Zerubavel, E. (2001). The clockwork muse: A practical guide to writing theses, dissertations, and books. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press.
  • In-person workshops and training
    • Professional development series: The Graduate School puts on a series of workshops for faculty members at any stage in their career. Some of these workshops including writing topics.
    • Graduate student writing resources: The Writing Center offers writing workshops and one-on-one appointments specifically for graduate students.
  • Online Software

    Please be advised that CCID does not endorse any of the software items listed below. These products are only listed here as examples of trends and options available in the field. CCID can review a small number of new tools each year. Send us a request if there is a particular tool you would like us to review for you.

    • Grammarly: This is freeware that is just what it sounds like: free software that is designed to catch grammar errors. The upside is that users find it very useful in catching errors, offering corrections, and explaining the errors. The downside is that users often become passive users and can pay little attention to the learning that can occur. So, use it but pay attention. Faculty and students can use this, together and separately.
    • Eli Review: There has been a lot of buzz about this software of late. What makes this software interesting is that faculty can set up the software to review for certain aspects of drafts, but students then must review a specified number of other students' drafts in order to receive feedback. Thus, students must contribute to receive, generating practiced feedback and receiving focused feedback, as well.

    The following list of software hasn't been fully reviewed yet by CCID, but may be found helpful to faculty members.

    • Annotation Studio (MIT): Social classroom-based tool, teacher inputs reading which all students can annotate and compare notes
    • Criterion (ETS): Uses automated writing to identify issues in grammar/organization/thesis/style (target: high school/middle school; have to be part of institution to get it)
    • Docuscope (Carnegie Mellon): Focuses on form/function of grammar and basic structure. DocuScope allows instructors to upload assignments and submissions and the program will look for things that are unique to that assignment to help with teaching genre norms.
    • ImpactStudio (Amy Stornaiuolo and Matthew Hall- University of Pennsylvania): NSF grant funded project develop a student facing analytic tool in a studio environment, designed to capture data from an online community, helps students think about themselves as writers impacting others who read what they write.
    • OnTopic (Carnegie Mellon): Program focused on readability. It tracks how often words are used in the paper to make sure that students aren't dropping topics or jumping around inconsistently. This offers a way to visually track clusters and topic gaps at the text, paragraph, or sentence level, allowing you to physically see how the known-new contract functions in a text.
    • Research Writing Tutor: compares drafts with corpus of published articles to give instead and individualized feedback suited to a particular discipline, program is explicitly based on Swales moves (only available at Iowa State right now, but they are working on an open access platform)
    • SpeechRater (ETS): Automated speech recognition system that allows for spoken-response scoring.
    • Thesis Writer (Kruse, Rapp): Supports degree programs where a large number of theses need to be written in German and English, step by step walk through of creating a thesis, replay functions allows the user to see every change they made to their paper. It also features a phrase book option that supplies students with academic phrasing (though they are finding that students are afraid to use this for fear of plagiarism).
    • Rhetorical Composing (Scott DeWitt): Gen ed MOOC that collected a sizable amount of peer review data. Allows students to submit work for peer review, which they only get back if they review three other submissions.
    • Writing Pal (Arizona State University): Uses games to teach how to write introductions, arguments, etc.
    • Writing Mentor (ETS): Google based, asks questions to identify and assess goals; offers reading help.