World-traveling doctor offers students travel opportunity

8/24/2007 7:00:00 AM

Students have the opportunity to travel to the Amazon jungle in Peru and study with one of the world's foremost experts in treating disease. Dr. Lane Rolling is holding a free seminar on Wednesday, Sept. 5, to talk about what he calls a different approach to helping the sick around the world. The approach involves learning, and understanding, tropical pathology and medicine.

"I witnessed children who were in agonizing pain, having violent seizures, and were literally bleeding internally to death right in front of me," Rolling said. "When we travel to other countries, we will learn how to alleviate pain and suffering, while gaining a greater understanding of medicine. Also, we hope to find promising new treatments for all diseases, not just those of tropical locales."

As part of the seminar Dr. Rolling is recruiting students to enroll in a class that involves study in Peru, either December 13 through 22 or January 3 through 13. The course focuses on study of Dengue Fever.

"Dengue Fever is the number one mosquito transmitted virus in the world. It has become the most important mosquito-borne viral disease affecting humans. Over two billion people worldwide live in areas at serious risk of becoming infected, with over 50 million being infected by the virus each year worldwide," Rolling added.

This course is designed for undergraduate, pre-medical and medical students. Medical professionals interested in first-hand experience with tropical diseases are also encouraged to participate. The course is designed to give students an awareness of worldwide healthcare needs and provide a practical educational experience.

"This is a rare opportunity for Northern Nevada undergraduate students who wish to have clinical and field lab experience while caring for patients," said Paula Lee Hobson, public information office director.

A former student participant echoed Hobson's comments "...The best experience you will ever have as a medical or undergraduate student. To learn and see tropical diseases in their environment is unbelievable. To do a humanitarian mission is one of the greatest opportunities you can have as a student," said Bennet Oberg, third-year medical student, Turuo Medical School, Las Vegas, Nev.


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