Professor to begin Institute for Advanced Study Fellowship

University to host the 46th Medieval Association of the Pacific

8/27/2014 - By: Annie Conway
Ned Schoolman University of Nevada, Reno assistant history professor Edward Schoolman was chosen to be a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, School of Historical Studies at Princeton University during the 2014-2015 academic year.

Assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Nevada, Reno, Edward (Ned) Schoolman, was chosen to be a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, School of Historical Studies at Princeton University during the upcoming 2014-2015 academic year. Schoolman is also  a local coordinator for the Medieval Association of the Pacific's annual conference, which the University will host for the first time in April, 2015. 

The Institute provides scholars around the world the opportunity to focus on their historical research. It is a selective program which requires members to have significant number of scholarly publications. Schoolman is excited to receive this fellowship.

"Especially in the field of medieval studies, the Institute for Advance Study has had a long history of supporting scholars working on long-term projects that push the envelope of the discipline," Schoolman said. "It is an understatement to say that it is a tremendous honor to have been selected for membership. My time at the Institute will undoubtedly prove to be a great asset to my research projects."

Schoolman has been in the Department of History in the College of Liberal Arts since 2010. His expertise focuses on early medieval studies. His research looks at the transition from the Roman Empire to the post-Roman Empire. He has studied many literary sources and archaeological evidence from this time period. He has studied extensively the cities of Ravenna and Antioch in his dissertation and the book he is writing.

During his time at the Institute, he will be working specifically on a project tracing the history of a noble family with both Germanic and Italian roots in the ninth through 11th centuries. Schoolman has already started research for the project through the help of a College of Liberal Arts Scholarly and Creative Activities Grant and an International Activities Grant.

Schoolman will be following in the footsteps of Barbara Walker, an associate professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, who was a member of the Institute during the 2013-2014 academic year.

"The Institute provides amazing research facilities for scholars," Walker said. "It is a truly marvelous community of brilliant scholars. My fellowship has enabled me to take my scholarship in fruitful new directions and to bring new ideas back to the University. No doubt Professor Schoolman will experience the same burst of intellectual stimulation and development that I did."

In addition to the fellowship, Schoolman spent five weeks in Rome this summer as part of the National Endowment of the Humanities Summer Seminar, "Reform in Renewal in Medieval Rome," held at the American Academy. The seminar is designed for teachers of American undergraduate students or select scholars to advance their research. During his time there, he was able to access Italian archives for his research.

During his fellowship in Princeton, Schoolman will also help as a local coordinator for the 48th annual conference of the Medieval Association of the Pacific. The conference will be held April 10 and 11, 2015. The keynote speakers will be free to the public to hear and will draw academics and students from around the country and internationally.

"It is a wonderful opportunity to attract attention to the University and the College of Liberal Arts," Schoolman said.

For more information about the Medieval Association of the Pacific's annual conference, visit www.medievalpacific.org/, and for more information about the Institute for Advanced Study, visit https://www.hs.ias.edu/


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