Professional School fall 2018 Workshop Schedule

All workshops are held from 12:00 - 12:50 p.m. in room 411 (Dean's Office conference room) in the Davidson Mathematics and Science Center.

September

5: The Personal Statement & Writing Your Resume
19: Letters of Recommendation & Professional School Interview

October

3: Health Professions Application Preparation

17: Careers in Health Care

31: Paying for Professional School

November

14: The Personal Statement & Letters of recommendation

Professional School preparation information by program

Dentists diagnose and treat problems with teeth and gums, and other tissues in and around the mouth, as well as provide advice and instruction on taking care of ones' oral health. In addition to providing direct care, dentists can also teach, conduct research, work in public and international health, perform corrective surgery on gums and supporting bones to treat gum disease, extract teeth and make models and measurements for dentures. They also administer anesthetics, write prescriptions for certain medications, and oversee the operation of their business if they are in private practice. For more information on a dental career, go to the US Department of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook's website: www.bls.gov/ooh /healthcare/dentists.htm

MAJOR

You can major in any undergraduate degree program provided you include the dental school prerequisite courses in your curriculum. Students must prepare themselves with a basic background in mathematics, chemistry, physics, and biology as well as the social and behavioral sciences, and the humanities.

Applying to dental school is a long and competitive process. Preparation is essential to being a successful applicant. Professional School Advising offers personal assistance for students in the College of Science with the application process. It is a good idea to meet regularly with the health professions advisor to create your plan and strategies for applying to dental school.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Course requirements may vary by school; for specific requirements see the ADEA Official Guide to Dental Schools which can be found at www.adea.org. It is the applicant's responsibility to determine the specific requirements of each program to which they are applying. All required courses should be taken for a letter grade. The general requirements are:

General Chemistry: 1 year with lab (CHEM 121, 122)
Organic Chemistry: 1 year with lab (CHEM 341/342/345)
Physics: 1 year with lab (PHYS 151, 152)
Biology: 1 year with lab (BIOL 190, 191, 192)
English: 1 year (ENGL 101,102)
Biochemistry: Introductory (BCH 400)
Additional courses to consider: Mircobiology, Anatomy & Physiology, Genetics, Immunology, Statistics, Calculus, Psychology, Art and Sculpture.

DENTAL ADMISSION TEST (DAT)

The DAT is a computerized comprehensive examination administered at Prometric Test Centers throughout the US. Candidates may schedule a test date on almost any day; test scores are available immediately. You should take the examination at least a year before you plan to enter dental school; you should not delay submission of your application if your DAT scores are not yet available.

The DAT consists of sections in Survey of the Natural Sciences (biology, inorganic and organic chemistry), Reading Comprehension, Perceptual Ability, and Quantitative Reasoning. Standard scores range from 1-30.. In addition to these scores, you are also given an overall science score and an academic average. The actual test time is approximately 4 hours; information on the test is available at www.ada.org/dat.aspx

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Clinical experience is required for admission to just about all dental schools, be it paid, volunteer, or observational. Admission committees want to be certain that you have knowledge of the field. It is also important for a competitive applicant to have participated in extracurricular activities, such as research, community and campus service, leadership roles, organized sports, and the pursuit of personal interests

APPLICATION PROCESS

Most dental schools belong to a centralized application service: the American Association of Dental School Application Service (AADSAS), which allows you to apply through one initial application. The application is usually available at the beginning of May: more information is available at http://www.adea.org/GoDental You will need to obtain applications from non-AADSAS schools by contacting them directly. Applications can be submitted beginning June 1 and it is recommended that applications be submitted as early as possible.

Secondary/Supplemental Applications are requests by AADSAS schools for additional information and fees. Some schools require that you submit the "secondary" shortly after you send in the AADSAS application; other schools do not want you to send the secondary until they notify you to do so. You will find complete instructions in the AADSAS application materials. For non-AADSAS schools there is just a single application.

Interviews are the final stage of the application process. If a school offers you an interview it means they are seriously considering you. All schools interview potential matriculates.

LETTERS OF EVALUATION (LOE)

Dental schools require LOE's, usually 1-2 from science faculty and one from a dentist. The time to submit the letters will vary, so it is best to check the instructions of each school to which you are applying. AADSAS offers a Letters of Evaluation Service.

You may also consider storing your letters with a document collection and delivery service such as Interfolio. With the use of Inerfolio, your letters can be kept on file and delivered to the programs you are applying to at the appropriate time. Learn more about the service at www.Interfolio.com

Selection for admission is based on many factors including GPA, DAT scores, letters of recommendation, the interview, extracurricular activities, personal statement, research experience, and awareness of and experience in health related and dental fields.

Law school normally takes three years to complete, culminating with the student earning a Juris Doctor degree (J.D.). While the emphasis of law school is to train students to be lawyers, a legal education will help you develop skills that can be applied to other career fields that require analytical thinking, negotiation, advocacy, counseling, research, writing and teaching. For more information go to the Law School Admissions Council: https://www.lsac.org and the US Department of Labor's Occupational Outlook Handbook: http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos053.htm#outlook

UNDERGRADUATE PREPARATION

Law schools require a bachelor's degree and there are no specific course requirements or recommended majors. Pre-law students are encouraged to challenge their thinking and reasoning skills by pursuing a rigorous undergraduate academic program. Students should choose a major in which they are truly interested and will do well in academically; the grade point average plays a significant role in the admission process. Suggested courses are those that help develop analytical and logical reasoning skills, composition skills, public speaking ability, understanding of human nature, knowledge of business and the economy, an understanding of historical contexts, and to conduct research and analysis competently. For more information, go to the ABA Preparing for Law School website: https://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/pre_law.hml

APPLYING

The Application usually consists of the CAS report, LSAT scores, transcripts, letters of recommendation, personal statement, individual law school application, resume, and addendum. Many law schools use "rolling admissions", so it is advantageous for you to submit your application early in the cycle - ideally by mid-November. For more information, go to: https://www.lsac.org/jd/ applying-to-law-school/overview

Law School Admissions Council (LSAC)

Your LSAC account is considered "the gateway to the admission process" and will help you keep track of everything related to your application". It is also a good idea to register with the Candidate Referral Service (CRS) so law schools can recruit you if they wish: https://www.lsac.org/jd/choosing-a-law-school/candidatae-referral-service

Credential Assembly Service (CAS)

CAS centralizes and standardizes your initial application and academic work. You will need to submit all of your college transcripts and letters of recommendation to CAS; they will then summarize your academic work and combine all of your documents with your LSAT score to create a report that will be sent to law schools to which you apply.

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

The LSAT consists of five 35-minute sections: reading comprehension, analytical reasoning, two logical reasoning sections, and a writing sample. The score scale for the LSAT is 120 to 180, with 153 being the national average. The LSAT is designed to measure skills that are considered essential for success in law school: the reading and comprehension of complex texts with accuracy and insight; the organization and management of information and the ability to draw reasonable inferences from it; the ability to think critically; and the analysis and evaluation of the reasoning and arguments of others.

When to take the test

Determine when the best time is for you to take the test. Given the importance placed on the LSAT, it is difficult to effectively choose schools without knowing your score. Repeat scores are calculated differently from school to school: some schools will average the scores, others may take the highest score, while others may use a formula. Plan to seriously prepare for the LSAT for 2-4 months; standard advice is to take 5-10 full-length exams as part of your preparation. For more information, go to the LSAC.ORg website - About the LSAT. 

Grade Point Average (GPA)

In determining a student's potential, law schools often consider the LSAT score and GPA together. The GPA, on its own, can be interpreted many ways, and includes such factors as your major, if there were external factors that brought your GPA down in a given semester, or whether you had to work to pay for your education. Through the CAS, grades are converted to allow law schools to uniformly compare applicants' grades earned at any undergraduate school. Most law schools use this "converted GPA" for admission purposes.

Personal Statement

The 2-3 page personal statement is a critical component of your admissions package. There are no personal interviews, so the statement is a crucial component of your application. Your essay should include why you became interested in the field of law, what experiences you have had that confirmed your interest in pursuing law, and significant life experiences - whether they have been scholarly, personal or in the workplace. These experiences can demonstrate growth, values, motivation, time management, and other characteristics and skills that are important. This is also the place to discuss any hardships you have had or struggles that you have overcome. Your statement should be concise and tell the committee something about you that is not included elsewhere in your application or resume. Plan to spend 2-4 months on your statement.

Letters of Recommendation (LOR)

Most law schools require 2-4 LORs. Individuals who know you well and can assess your ability to succeed in law school should write them, such as professors, internship supervisors, or employers. At least one letter should be from a professor who can assess your academic potential for law school. CAS has a Letter of Recommendation Service which most schools require applicants use. For more information, go to the LSAC.org website – LOR evaluations.

You may also consider storing your letters with a document collection and delivery service such as Interfolio: www.Interfolio.com

Resume Many law schools require a resume. Your resume for this purpose can be longer and more detailed than a job-search resume; follow the guidance given to you be each law school.

WHICH LAW SCHOOL?

There are about 200 ABA approved law schools in the US, and the decision of which law school to attend can be more complicated than the decision to apply to law school. Selecting a law school that is best for you requires careful research and that you determine what your priorities are. Some criteria to consider: curriculum, clinical programs, location, reputation/ranking, environment, bar passage rate, student/faculty ratio, cost, career placement resources. Information on each law school can be found in The LSAC Official Guide to ABA-Approved Law Schools: www.lsac.org It is also useful to attend UNR's annual Professional and Graduate School Fair and the national law school forum in the San Francisco Bay area or Los Angeles.

If possible, visit the schools you are considering. Although most schools do not include a formal interview as part of the admission process, many admission officers will be happy to meet with you. Many of them will arrange for campus tours, the opportunity to sit in on a class, financial aid appointments and other guidance.

One more thing!

Apply Early! Start the process up to 18 months before you enter law school. Some schools use "rolling admissions" - they review applications as they become complete AND accept people throughout the admissions season. More information is available at www.LSAC.org and from the Professional School Adviser in the College of Science.

Physicians diagnose and treat illness and injuries. They examine patients; prescribe medications; order, perform and interpret diagnostic tests; counsel patients on diet and preventative health care.

There are two types of medical schools that reflect different theories and practices. Medical licensing agencies recognize them as equivalent degrees: Allopathic Medicine (MD) and Osteopathic Medicine (DO). After 4 years of medical school (MD or DO), graduates are required to complete a residency program before they can obtain their certification to practice medicine. For more information go to https://explorehealthcareers.org/field/Medicine and https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/home.htm

APPLICATION PREPARATION

"Pre-medicine" is not a major, but a set of courses required by medical schools for admission. Any major is appropriate as long as the student fulfills all premedical requirements before applying. Students should participate in activities that allow them to demonstrate interpersonal competencies such as service orientation, social/interpersonal skills, cultural competence, team work, and oral communication. Information on competencies for entering medical school students can be found at https://students-residents.aamc.org/applying-medical-school-article/corecompetencies

Applying to medical school is a long and competitive process. Preparation is key to being a successful applicant. Professional School Advising offers assistance with the application process for students in the College of Science. It is a good idea to regularly meet with the health professions advisor to create your plan and strategies for applying to medical school.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Course requirements may vary by school. Specific requirements can be found in the Medical School Admission Requirements, available at www.aamc.org , or in the Osteopathic Medical College Information Book, available at www.aacom.org/become-a-doctor . It is the applicant's responsibility to determine the specific requirements of each program to which they are applying. All required courses should be taken for a letter grade. The general requirements are:

  • General Chemistry: 1 year with lab (Chem 121, 122)
  • Organic Chemistry: 1 year with lab (Chem 341,342, 345)
  • Physics: 1 year with lab (Physics 151, 152)
  • English: 1 year (English 101, 102)
  • Mathematics: 1 year of calculus for about 25% of schools (MATH 181, 182) 
  • and a class in statistics 
  • Biology: Most schools require a minimum of 12 credits of biology, with at least one lab: BIOL190, 191 and 192, 223 - 224, 251. Courses in genetics, molecular biology, and immunology are strongly recommended.
  • Biochemistry: Biochemistry 400
  • Psychology: Psychology 101
  • Sociology: Sociology 101
  • Social Sciences & Humanities: A well-rounded background is important.

MEDICAL COLLEGE ADMISSIONS TEST (MCAT)

The MCAT consists of 4 sections: Psychological, Social and Biological Foundations of Behavior; Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems; Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems; and Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills. It is a computer-based test lasting about 7 hours, and in is offered approximately 30 times from January - September. It is advisable to take the MCAT at least a year before you plan to enter medical school. You should take the MCAT when you are ready, rather than at a pre-conceived time. Information on the MCAT is available at www.aamc.org/students/applying/mcat/

Before you take the MCAT you should complete the general course requirements. Although no specific English courses prepare you for the Critical Analysis section, you should develop a high level of reading speed and comprehension. It is difficult to develop the skill you will need in a short period of time - so start early by reading a lot.

EXPERIENCE

Students need to demonstrate experience in working with people through work, volunteering, extracurricular activities, research, and leadership. In addition, clinical experience is extremely important for admission to most medical schools; admission committees want to know that an applicant has knowledge of the field and the job of a physician. Extracurricular activities, such as being involved in community and campus service, organized sports, the pursuit of personal interests are also important to be a competitive applicant.

APPLICATION PROCESS

The application process starts approximately 18 months prior to matriculation, and applications are submitted approximately 12-15 months prior to entering medical school. Most allopathic medical schools belong to the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS), which allows you to apply through one initial application at www.aamc.org. You can apply to all osteopathic medical schools through the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS) at www.aacom.org/become-a-doctor/applying

Secondary/Supplemental Applications

After receiving your initial application, a medical school will send you their own application, known as a secondary or supplementary application. The criteria used in deciding who is invited to complete a secondary application varies among medical schools.

Interviews are the final stage of the application process. If a school offers you an interview it means they are seriously considering you. All schools interview potential matriculates.

Letters of Recommendation

Medical schools require letters of recommendation, usually 3-5 - check carefully to see what each school you are applying to requires. It is advisable that 1-2 letters come from science faculty and one from someone in health care with whom you have worked or volunteered. Letters of Recommendation Services are available through AMCAS student-residents.aamc.org/applying-medical-school/faq/amcas-faq and AACOMAS aacom.org/become-a-doctor/applying/aacomas-application-instructions

You may also consider storing your letters with a document collection and delivery service such as Interfolio: www.Interfolio.com

Selection for admission is based on many factors including undergraduate grade point average, MCAT scores, letters of recommendation, extracurricular activities, an interview, personal statement, research experience, and awareness of and experience in health related fields.

Optometrists are the main providers of vision care. Doctors of Optometry (O.D's) examine peoples' eyes to diagnose vision problems; test patients' depth and color perception and ability to focus; prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses; can detect general diseases of the human body that have the potential capacity to affect vision, such as diabetes, hypertension, and arteriosclerosis. Optometrists differ from ophthalmologists, who are physicians (M.D.'s) specializing in eye surgery and treatment of eye diseases; and dispensing opticians, who fill lens prescriptions written by the optometrist or ophthalmologist. For more information on a career in optometry, read the US Department of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook's website.

MAJOR

There is no one prescribed major for acceptance to optometry school. Students must prepare themselves with a basic background in chemistry, physics, mathematics and biology as well as the social and behavioral sciences, and the humanities. Beyond this basic preparation, you should choose a major that interests you.

Applying to optometry school is a long and competitive process. Preparation is key to being a successful applicant. Professional School Advising offers assistance for students in the College of Science with the application process. It is a good idea to meet regularly with the health professions advisor to create your plan and strategies for applying to optometry school.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Specific course requirements may vary for each optometry program. It is the applicant's responsibility to determine the specific requirements of each program to which they are applying. Each school's requirements are available at the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry website: https://optometriceducation.org/students-future-students/resources . In general, courses at UNR that fulfill the basic requirements:

  • English 1 year (English 101, 102)
  • General Chemistry 1 year with lab (Chemistry 121, 122)
  • Organic Chemistry 1 year with lab (Chemistry 341, 342, 345)
  • Biology General (Biology 190, 191 & 192)
  • Anatomy Physiology (Biology 223 & 224)
  • Microbiology (Biology 251 or 276/276L)
  • Physics 1 year with lab (Physics 151, 152)
  • Psychology General (Psychology 101)
  • Mathematics 1 semester calculus (Math 181), and Statistics 152
  • Biochemistry General Biochemistry (Biochemistry 400)

OPTOMETRY EDUCATION

The Doctor of Optometry degree is a

4 year

program completed at an accredited school of optometry. Some programs accept applicants who have completed a minimum of 3 years of undergraduate study; however most programs prefer or will require completion of an undergraduate degree prior to matriculation.

OPTOMETRY ADMISSION TEST (OAT)

The OAT, required by all colleges of optometry, tests academic ability and scientific comprehension. The test is offered throughout the year at Prometric Test Centers. It is recommended that you take the OAT before applying to optometry school. The test has 4 sections: Survey of the Natural Sciences, Reading Comprehension, Physics, and Quantitative Reasoning. You can register for the OAT, find test preparation materials and The OAT Guide at www.ada.org/en/oat

EXPERIENCE

Volunteer or paid experience with an optometrist is essential to your preparation for optometry school; admission committees want to know that an applicant has knowledge of the field and the job of an optometrist. In addition, conducting research with faculty is also recommended. Extracurricular activities, such as being involved in community and campus service, organized sports, the pursuit of personal interests are also important to be a competitive applicant.

APPLICATION PROCESS

The application process for most optometry schools starts approximately 12-15 months prior to your matriculation date. All optometry schools belong to the Optometry Centralized Application Service (OptomCAS) which allows you to apply through one initial web-based application at www.optomcas.org Applicants are encouraged to apply early and be aware that application deadlines vary for each school.

Supplemental/Secondary Application

After submitting your initial application, most optometry schools will require that you complete their application, often called the supplemental or "secondary" application. At this time, you will be asked to also send the school a fee. It is the responsibility of the applicant to check the requirements of each school to make sure they have been fulfilled.

Interviews are the final stage of the application process. If a school offers you an interview, it means they are seriously considering you. All schools interview potential matriculates.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Two to three letters of recommendation are generally required for application to optometry school; check each school instructions for specific requirements. The letters usually should be from a professor, an optometrist who can evaluate your potential in the field, and an employer or someone with whom you have done volunteer work. OptomCAS offers a Letter of Recommendation service that allows up to 4 letters.

You may also consider storing your letters with a document delivery service such as Interfolio; for more information go to https://www.interfolio.com

Selection for admission is based on many factors including undergraduate GPA, test scores, letters of recommendation, length and depth of optometry experience, extracurricular activities, the interview, personal statement, research experience, and awareness of and experience in health-related fields.

A Physician Assistant (PA) is a health care professional licensed to practice medicine with physician supervision in a variety of health care settings, such as physician offices, hospitals, clinics, HMO's, and the armed services. PAs perform a wide range of medical duties which include conducting physical exams, ordering and interpreting laboratory tests and x-rays, diagnosing and treating illness and injuries, and in most states write prescriptions. Given the relatively short training period for PA's, schools expect that candidates have already gained direct patient care experience prior to application, ideally through employment. For more information go to the American Academy of Physician Assistants website: www.aapa.org or the US Department of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook's website.

MAJOR

There is no one prescribed major for acceptance to PA programs. Students must prepare themselves with a basic background in mathematics, chemistry, and biology, as well as the social and behavioral sciences, and the humanities. Beyond this basic preparation, choose a major in what interests you.

Applying to a PA program is a long and competitive process. Preparation is key to being a successful applicant. Professional School Advising provides assistance for students in the College of Science with the application process. It is a good idea to meet regularly with the health professions advisor to create your plan and strategies for applying.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

While specific course requirements may vary by program, the following courses are generally required. Information on all PA programs is available at http://directory.paeaonline.org It is the applicant's responsibility to determine the requirements of each program to which they are applying. All required courses must be taken for a letter grade. The general requirements include:

  • Chemistry: General 121, 122 both with lab
  • Biology: General 190, 191, and 192
  • Human Anatomy and Physiology 223, 224
  • Microbiology 251
  • English: Composition 101, 102 
  • Psychology: General 101
  • Additional courses to consider: organic chemistry, biochemistry, statistics, genetics, medical terminology, immunology, Spanish, pharmacology, abnormal psychology, public health.

Information for the UNR PA program can be found at https://med.unr.edu/physician-assistant

EXPERIENCE

PA programs generally require applicants have 250-2000 hours of direct hands on patient care before applying. Some employment options in which to earn the required hours include: medical assistant, paramedic, certified nursing assistant, nurse, EMT, respiratory therapist, phlebotomist, scribe, PT aide.. Research each program for specific requirements regarding the type of experience they will accept, and the number of hours required or recommended.

PA EDUCATION

A Master's degree is required to become a PA. Because of the close working relationship PAs have with physicians, they are educated in a medical model designed to complement physician training. For more information go to Physician Assistant Education Association: www.paeaonline.org

Generally, PA programs take 2-3 years: 9 to 12 months of classroom studies, followed by 9 to 15 months of supervised clinical rotations. PA's can also do post graduate residencies and specialize in such areas as emergency medicine, neonatology and surgery.

APPLICATION PROCESS

The application process starts approximately 18 months prior to matriculation, and applications should be submitted approximately 12-14 months prior to entering a PA program. Most PA programs belong to the Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA) which allows students to apply through one initial application. For more information go to www.caspaonline.org/ If you apply to schools which do not participate in CASPA, you will need to submit individual applications directly to each school.

Most PA programs require that students take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), a computerized test which is offered year round. For more information go to www.gre.org

Secondary/Supplemental Applications: After receiving your initial application, some PA programs will send you their own application, known as a secondary or supplemental application.

Interviews are the final stage of the application process. If a school offers you an interview it means they are seriously considering you. All schools interview potential matriculates.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Most programs require three letters of reference (LOR's): from a health care provider with an advanced degree, an employer, and the third from a faculty member - science professors are preferred. Check the LOR requirement for each program to which you are applying. CASPA offers a Letters of Recommendation Service; for more information go to https://help.liasonedu.com/CASPA_Applicant_Help_Center

You may also consider storing your letters with a document collection and delivery service, such as Interfolio for more information go to www.Interfolio.com

Pharmacists are health care professionals who are concerned with the pharmaceutical needs of patients. The responsibilities of pharmacists have broadened from dispensing medicines to consultations with physicians, direct patient care, and patient education. Pharmacists can work in a variety of settings, such as community pharmacies, hospitals, ambulatory clinics, nursing homes, health maintenance organizations, conduct research, teach, quality control, and product development. For more information, read the US Department of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook's website: www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/pharmacists.htm or the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy: www.aacp.org/about-aacp

MAJOR

There is not one prescribed academic program for acceptance to pharmacy school; the major you choose can be in any subject, and should be based on your interests, abilities, and needs, as long as pharmacy school entrance requirements are completed. Students must prepare themselves with a basic background in chemistry, physics, mathematics, and biology, as well as the social and behavioral sciences and the humanities. Students need to develop strong reasoning, analytical, and communication skills.

Applying to pharmacy school is a long and competitive process. Preparation is key to being a successful applicant. Professional School Advising offers assistance with the application process for students in the College of Science. It is a good idea to regularly meet with the health professions advisor to create your plan and strategies for applying to pharmacy school.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Each school's requirements are detailed in the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy School Admissions Requirements (PSAR) available at www.aacp.org/resources/phrmacy-school-admission-requirements It is the applicants' responsibility to determine the specific requirements of each program to which they are applying. All required courses should be taken for a letter grade. The general requirements include:

Chemistry:

  • General 121, 122 
  • Organic 341, 342, 345 

Biology:

  • General 190, 191, 192 
  • Human Anatomy & Phys. 223-224
  • Microbiology 251 

Physics:

  • General 151-152 
  • Calculus:
  • Math 181 

English:

  • Composition 101, 102

Speech:

  • Fundamentals Speech Com. 113

Economics:

  • Microeconomics 102 OR
  • Macroeconomics 103

Additional Recommended Courses:

  • Psychology 101 General Psychology 
  • Biology 300 Genetics
  • Biology 315 Cell Biology
  • Biology 453 Immunology
  • Stats 152 Introduction to Statistics
  • BCH 400 Introductory Biochemistry 
  • BCH 417 Metabolic Regulation
  • Math 182 Calculus IIPHARMACY EDUCATION: Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm. D.) degree programs require at least 2 years of specific undergraduate course work followed by 3-4 years of professional study. Some programs accept applicants who have completed a minimum of 3 years of undergraduate study; however most programs prefer or require completion of an undergraduate degree prior to matriculation.

STANDARDIZED TESTS

Approximately 85% of pharmacy schools require the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT). Check with each college for their requirement regarding the test. The PCAT is a general aptitude test that consists of five content areas: Quantitative Reasoning, Biological Processes, Chemical Processes, Reading Comprehension, and Writing. It is recommended that you take the PCAT during the winter or spring of the year you are applying. Information on the PCAT is available at http://pcatweb.info/

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Clinical experience is strongly recommended for admission to most pharmacy schools. It does not matter if you are paid or a volunteer; admission committees want to know that an applicant has knowledge of and exposure to the profession. It is also important for a competitive applicant to have participated in extracurricular activities, such as community and campus service, organized sports, research, the pursuit of personal interests - all can be important in the admission process.

APPLICATION PROCESS

The application process for pharmacy schools starts approximately 18 months prior to your matriculation date, and applications should be submitted 12-14 months before entering pharmacy school. Applicants need to prepare early by identifying schools to which they may apply, and the requirements, guidelines and deadlines for each program. Most pharmacy schools belong to the Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS): www.pharmcas.org/

Secondary/Supplemental Applications: After receiving your initial application (the PharmCAS application), a pharmacy school will send you their own application, known as a secondary or supplemental application.

Interviews are the final state of the application process. If a school offers you an interview it means they are seriously considering you. All schools interview potential matriculants.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Most pharmacy schools require that the applicant send 2 - 4 letters of recommendation. It is advisable that one letter is from a pharmacist, preferably one with whom you have worked; plus letters from science professors and/or former employer. It is your responsibility to make sure you are submitting the correct letters for each school to which you are applying. PharmCAS provides a Letter of Recommendation Service; for more information go to www.pharmcas.org/preparing-to-apply/what-youll-need-to-apply/letters-of-reference

You may also consider storing your letters with a document collection and delivery service such as Interfolio: www.Interfolio.com

Selection for admission is based on many factors including undergraduate GPA, test scores, letters of recommendation, extracurricular activities, an interview, personal statement, research experience, and awareness of and experience in health-related fields.

Physical Therapists (PT) are licensed healthcare providers who diagnose and treat individuals of all ages. PT's evaluate and develop treatment plans for people with health conditions as a result of disease, injury and/or illness. Their patients include accident and stroke victims, injured athletes, amputees, handicapped individuals, and people with minor joint or muscle aches. The goal of treatment is to improve circulation, strengthen muscles, restore motor skills, relieve pain, and expedite recovery. PT's are employed in hospitals, private offices, industrial health centers, sports facilities, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, home health agencies, schools, armed services, or teach in colleges and universities.

Personal qualifications important to a physical therapist include patience, problem-solving skills, compassion, strong interpersonal skills, the ability to instruct and motivate, and to be comfortable touching and treating the human body. For PT career information, read the US Department of Labor's Occupational Outlook Handbook's website: www.bls.gov/ohh/healthcare/physical-therapist.htm

MAJOR

Pre-physical therapy is not a major, but a set of courses required by physical therapy programs for admission. You can major in any undergraduate degree program provided that you include the required physical therapy prerequisite courses. Students must prepare themselves with a basic background in chemistry, physics, mathematics and biology, as well as the social and behavioral sciences and the humanities.

Applying to a PT program is a long and competitive process. Preparation is key to being a successful applicant. Professional School Advising offers assistance for students in the College of Science with the application process. It is a good idea to regularly meet with the health professions advisor to create your plan and strategies for applying to PT programs.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Specific course requirements may vary for each physical therapy program. Information on the PT programs and the admissions process can be found at http://www.ptcas.org/DirectoryProgramsList It is the applicant's responsibility to determine the requirements of each program to which they are applying. All required courses must be taken for a letter grade. The general requirements include:

  • General Chemistry: Chemistry 121 and 122
  • General Physics: Physics 151, 152
  • General Biology: Biology 190, 191, 192 
  • Anatomy/Physiology: Biology 223, 224 
  • Statistics: Statistics 152 or APST 270
  • Social & Behavioral
  • Sciences: 1 or 2 courses (Psychology 101, 441; HDFS 201)
  • Additional courses that may be required or recommended include: organic chemistry, microbiology, biochemistry, exercise physiology, kinesiology, public speaking, and medical terminology. More information is available at http://www.ptcas.org/ProgramPrereqs/ 


PHYSICAL THERAPY EDUCATION

The length of DPT programs is usually 3 years. Most DPT programs require that applicants have earned a bachelor's degree prior to admission. More information can be found at www.apta.org/PTEducation/Overview

STANDARDIZED TESTS

PT programs require the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The test is computer-based and offered year-round; for more information go to www.gre.org.

EXPERIENCE

Clinical experience is required for admission to PT programs. Most schools require experience in at least 2 different physical therapy environments, with one being in-patient. The amount of required hours varies by schools; carefully check each school's requirements. It is also important for a competitive applicant to become involved in community and campus service, research, organized sports, personal interests - get experience working with and being around diverse populations.

APPLICATION PROCESS

The application process begins at least 18 months prior to your matriculation and applications should be submitted 12-15 months before expected enrollment: www.apta.org/prospectivestudents/AdmissionsPTProcess/ Most physical therapy programs belong to the Physical Therapy Centralized Application Service (PTCAS) which allows students to apply through one initial application. For more information go to http://www.ptcas.org/ApplicationInstructions/ If applying to non-PTCAS programs, contact each program directly to request an application.

Secondary/Supplemental Applications

After receiving your initial application, some PT programs will send you their own application, known as a secondary or supplemental application. Interviews are the final stage of the application process. If a school offers you an interview it means they are seriously considering you. All schools interview potential matriculates.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Most physical therapy programs require 1-4 letters of recommendation. At least one letter needs to be from a physical therapist, preferably one with whom you have worked, who can evaluate your ability and the kind of asset you will be to the profession; letters from science instructors and/or former employers may also be required. Check carefully with each program to see what they require. PTCAS provides a Letters of Reference Service; for more information go to www.ptcas.org/References

You may also consider storing your letters with a document collection and delivery service such as Interfolio. More information about the service can be found at www.Interfolio.com

Selection for admission is based on many factors including undergraduate GPA, test scores, letters of recommendation, length and depth of PT experience, extracurricular activities, the interview, personal statement, research experience, and awareness of and experience in health-related fields.