2017 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report

Joe Crowley Student Union

Report prepared by University Police Services. This Annual Security and Fire Safety Report contains statistics for the three most recent full calendar years, 2014, 2015 and 2016.


Message from the Vice President

September 5, 2017

I would like to extend a welcome to everyone as we begin the 2017 school year. At the University of Nevada, Reno we continue to grow with each passing year and ensuring the safety and well-being of all of the members of our community remains a high priority.

As Nevada's land-grant University founded in 1874, we maintain a statewide presence in all Nevada counties. Safety and security on campus is a shared responsibility and we must all strive to continue making our university a great place to study, live and work. We depend on all members of our community to report any suspicious activity and any crimes they are made aware of.

The University of Nevada, Reno is committed to maintaining a high quality of living and learning experiences for all of our students and visitors. As you read through the 2017 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report you will find information about safety resources, crime statistics and services available to our campus community.

I hope you find the information helpful. I welcome any comments or suggestions that may assist us in maintaining the safety of our community.

Vic Redding
Vice President, Administration & Finance
University of Nevada, Reno/0003
Reno, Nevada 89557-0003
(775) 784-4031 office
(775) 784-1774 fax
Email: vredding@unr.edu


Message from the Director

On behalf of all of us at University Police Services, thank you for taking the time to review the University of Nevada, Reno's Annual Security and Fire Safety Report. Our commitment to keeping the community informed is just one way we strive to keep our campus environment safe and enjoyable. As you read through the report, you will find information about policies and practices regarding safety, security and crimes occurring on or near campus. I hope you find the information helpful and informative.

The primary goal at Police Services is to ensure our campus is a safe place to study, live and work and we continuously work to maintain strong relationships with our campus community, and our regional partners in law enforcement.

Please feel free to contact me directly at agarcia@unr.edu, or by phone at (775) 784-4013 if you have any questions, concerns or suggestions for Police Services.

It is my honor to have the opportunity to serve you.

Adam Garcia
Assistant Vice President & Director University of Nevada, Reno
Police Services
University Police Services
1664 N. Virginia St. University of Nevada, Reno/0250 Reno, Nevada 89557-0250
(775) 784-4013 office
(775) 784-1695 fax
www.unr.edu/police


Table of Contents


Policy Statement Addressing Preparation of Disclosure of Crime Statistics

University Police Services prepares this report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. The report is prepared in cooperation with the local law enforcement agencies, Residential Life Services and the Office of Student Conduct. Each entity provides updated information on their educational efforts and programs to comply with the act.

Campus crime, arrest and referral statistics include those reported to University Police Services, designated campus officials (including but not limited to directors, deans, department heads, advisors to students/student organizations, athletics coaches), and local law enforcement agencies. Statistics included in the current Annual Security and Fire Safety Report are for all of our campuses combined. Our branch campuses (Redfield, and UNSOM) follow the same policies except where otherwise noted and included in their respective sections.

Counseling Services staff informs their clients of the procedures to report crime to University Police Services on a voluntary or confidential basis, should they feel it is in the best interest of the client.

An e-mail notification is made to all enrolled students that provides the web site to access this report. The full text of this report can be located on our website at https://www.unr.edu/police/clery.

Anyone wishing to obtain a paper copy may do so at the University Police Services office in the Fitzgerald Student Services Building Monday – Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm (excluding holidays on which university offices are closed). The web site address is also attached to employment applications obtained through the State of Nevada web site and the university’s employment website.


University Police Services Authority and Jurisdiction

University Police Services is a fully functional law enforcement agency.

University Police Services officers have full police powers; certified by the Nevada Department of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) in accordance with the laws of the State of Nevada. They perform the same function as officers from city, county and state agencies - enforcing all local, state and federal laws and ordinances within the jurisdiction of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) properties in northern Nevada. Officers patrol NSHE properties 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

University Police Services

University Police Services officers have jurisdiction on the main University of Nevada, Reno campus and all properties owned, operated or governed by the university including Greek houses, Cooperative Extensions, various medical offices and other sites throughout the state; Truckee Meadows Community College main and branch campuses, as well as Desert Research Institute Reno Campus. As of July 1, 2017, University Police Services no longer has jurisdiction over the Medical District in Las Vegas. University Police Services work in cooperation with all regional law enforcement agencies through official agreements for mutual assistance. The department is linked to these other agencies through the Reno Emergency Communications Center, which provides dispatch services for police and other emergency services in Washoe County. University Police Services also has the ability to share crime information through shared information systems.


Interlocal Agreement

University Police Services works closely with surrounding law enforcement agencies to include the Nevada Department of Public Safety, Washoe County Sheriff’s Office, Sparks Police Department, Reno Police Department, Washoe County School District Police Department and Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.

University Police Services maintains a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with these agencies giving University Police Services additional jurisdiction to provide for mutual assistance between local law enforcement partners.

The MOU allows for peace officers of University Police Services to exercise their powers or authority on public and private property within the County of Washoe, including the City of Reno, the City of Sparks, and various other sites throughout Clark County.

In accordance with the agreement, the Assistant Vice President & Director of University Police Services, or his designee, may request assistance from the Washoe County Sheriff, Reno Police Chief, Sparks Police Chief, Nevada Highway Patrol Chief, Clark County Sheriff or the designee of any of them, in any law enforcement matter within the jurisdiction of the University of Nevada, Reno.


Statement Addressing Security and Access

During business hours, the university (excluding certain housing facilities) will be open to students, parents, employees, contractors, guests, and invitees. During non business hours access to all university facilities is by key or key card, if issued, or by admittance via University Police Services or Residential Life staff.

The university has an electronic access control system as well as a series of key controlled hardware to help secure the residence halls. Residents need to remember that regardless of the quality and level of safety the electronic access control system provides, it is their own actions that will support or undermine the security procedures in place. Resident students should be aware that changes to security or life safety related systems or procedures may occur when determined to be appropriate by University Police Services.

Residence halls are locked and secured 24 hours a day and access is controlled by sophisticated perimeter security and door locking systems. There are 24-hour information and security desk operations at each residence hall with full time staff who conduct regular building rounds. Our halls have live-in staff that receive training on safety and security issues as well as providing educational programs on personal and property safety

Over extended breaks, the doors of all halls will be secured around the clock, and will be equipped with a lock separate from the regular key issued to resident students. Some facilities may have individual hours, which may vary at different times of the year. Examples are Lombardi Recreation Center, E.L. Wiegand Fitness Center, and campus libraries. In these cases, the facilities will be secured according to schedules developed by the department responsible for the facility. Emergencies may necessitate changes or alterations to any posted schedules.


Policy Statement Addressing the Encouragement of Accurate and Prompt Reporting of Criminal Offenses

Students, faculty, staff and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and public safety related incidents to University Police Services as soon as possible. Faculty and staff are required to report crimes they become aware of through contact with other members of the campus community.

Crimes should be reported to University Police Services to ensure inclusion in the annual crime statistics and to aid in providing timely warning notices to the campus community when appropriate.

Any suspicious activity or person seen in the parking lots or loitering around vehicles, inside buildings or around the residential halls should be reported to University Police Services.

University Police Services Office in the Fitzgerald Student Services Building

To report crimes contact University Police Services at (775) 784-4013 (non-emergencies) Monday – Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm (excluding holidays and weekends when university offices are closed), contact (775) 334-COPS (2677) (non-emergency after hours), dial 9-1-1 (emergencies only), or use the Blue Light telephones located in the Residential Halls, Parking Lots and at various locations throughout campus (emergencies only).


Statement Addressing Counselors and Confidential Crime Reporting

A Professional Counselor is defined as an employee of an institution whose official responsibilities include providing psychological counseling to members of the institution’s community and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or certification.

Counselors are encouraged to inform persons being counseled, when they think it is appropriate, of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis for inclusion into the annual crime statistics.

The University of Nevada, Reno does not currently offer pastoral counseling services.

This policy is intended to make students aware of the various reporting and confidential disclosure options available to them so they can make informed choices about where to turn should they want to report an act of sexual violence. The University encourages such students to talk to someone identified in one or more of these groups.

The Options

Privileged and Confidential Communications

Professional Counselors. Professional, licensed counselors who provide mental-health counseling to members of the school community (and including those who act in that role under the supervision of a licensed counselor) are not required to report any information about an incident to the Title IX coordinator without a student's permission. Following is the contact information for these individuals:

  • Counseling Services
    (775) 784-4648
    Pennington Student Achievement Center, Suite 420 Hours: M-Th 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Fri. 8 am - 5 p.m.
    After hours: (775) 297-8315
    www.unr.edu/counseling
  • Student Health Center
    (775) 784-6598
    Hours: M-Th 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed evenings and weekends
    www.unr.edu/shc/
  • UNR Psychological Services Center
    (775) 784-6668
    Cain Hall Room 206
  • Victims of Crime Treatment Center
    (775) 682-8684, Lorraine Benuto, Ph.D.
    Cain Hall Room 206
  • Confidential Victim Advocate
    (775) 771-8724
    CampusAdvocate@crisiscallcenter.org
    Continuing Education Building, Room 204

Statement Addressing Limited Confidential Reporting

University Police Services encourages anyone who is the victim of, or witness to, any crime to promptly report the incident to the police or talk to someone about what happened in order for them to receive the support they need and so the university can respond appropriately. Different employees on campus have different abilities to maintain a reporting student’s confidentiality.

  • Some are required to maintain near complete confidentiality; talking to them is sometimes called “privileged communication.”
  • Other employees may talk to a reporting student in confidence, and generally only report to the university that an incident occurred without revealing any personally identifying information. Disclosures to these employees will not trigger a university investigation into an incident against the reporting student’s wishes, except in certain circumstances as discussed below.
  • Some employees are required to report all the details of an incident (including the identities of both the reporting student and all other students involved) to the Title IX A report to these employees (called “responsible employees”) constitutes a report to the university—and generally obligates the university to investigate the incident and take appropriate steps to address the situation.

If a reporting student discloses an incident to a responsible employee but wishes to maintain confidentiality or requests that no investigation into a particular incident be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the University will weigh that request against the University’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students, including the reporting student.

If the University honors the request for confidentiality, a reporting student will be informed that the University’s ability to investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the identified student may be limited.

There are times when, in order to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students, the University may not be able to honor a reporting student’s request for confidentiality. The University has designated the following individual to evaluate requests for confidentiality made by a reporting student:

Title IX Coordinator (775) 784-1547

The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others. With such information, the university can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crimes statistics for the institution. For additional information visit or visit >www.unr.edu/eotix.


How to Report a Crime

When reporting an emergency, crime or suspicious activity at the university, follow these steps:

For Emergencies:

  • Dial 911- (from a campus phone, you must dial 9-911)
  • Give your name and location (state specifically that you are at the university)
  • Briefly describe the activity you are reporting
  • Request medical attention if needed
  • Remain calm and speak slowly
  • Stay on the phone until the dispatcher ends the call
  • If possible, give a description of the person (s) and vehicle involved, location or direction of travel and presence of weapons if known

For non-emergency situations:

Dial (775) 334-COPS (2677) or use the on-line report form from the University Police Services web page at: www.unr.edu/police.

University Police Services:

  • Emergency: 911 (9-911 on campus)
  • Non-Emergency: (775) 334-2677
  • Business Office: (775) 784-4013

If you are uncomfortable reporting an incident to University Police Services, you may also contact the following:

  • Vice-President for Student Services
    (775) 784-6196
    Clark Administration
  • Counseling Service
    (775) 784-4648
    Pennington Student Achievement Center, Ste. 420
  • Student Health Services
    (775) 784-6598
    Nell J. Redfield Bldg.
  • Student Conduct
    (775) 784-4388
    Clark Administration
  • Housing and Residential Life
    (775) 784-1113
    Juniper Hall

Campus Security Authorities (CSA) are individuals who are employed at, do business on, or volunteer at any University campus or sponsored event. Crime reports can be made to any CSA in confidence. CSA’s will only report to University Police Services for statistical purposes, that an incident occurred without revealing any personally identifying information. Disclosures by any CSA will not trigger an investigation into an incident against the reporting student’s wishes, except in certain circumstances that pose an immediate or ongoing threat to campus safety.


Daily Crime Log

A daily log of reported crimes is maintained by the records section in accordance with the Clery Act. The crime log includes the type of incident, reported date and time of occurrence and general location as well as the disposition of the incident, if this information is known.

The crime log is available online at https://www.unr.edu/police/data-center/daily-crime-log. The crime log can also be viewed by the public at the University Police Services Office in the Fitzgerald Student Services Building Monday - Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm (excluding holidays on which university offices are closed).

Please contact our office if you have an immediate need to view the log.


Important Numbers to Know

University Police Services

Emergency: Non-Campus phone: 911 (Campus Phone: 9-911)
Non-Emergency: (775) 334-2677
Business Office: (775) 784-4013

ASUN Campus Escort

(775) 742-6808
Fall hours: Aug 28-Nov 4, 7:00 pm – 1:00 am
Nov 5 – Dec 22, 5:00 pm – 1:00 am
Closed Oct 27 – Oct 28 (Nevada Day), Nov 23 – Nov 25 (Thanksgiving),
Dec 23 – Jan 2 (Winter break)
Spring Hours: Jan 22 – Mar 10, 5:00 pm – 1:00 am
Mar 11 – May 18, 7:00 pm – 1:00 am
Closed Feb 19 (President’s Day), Mar 17 – 25 (Spring Break)
Light Services over Wintermester and Summer Session

Student Cadets – Mid Campus

(775) 745-5921
Mon – Thurs 6:00 pm – 12:15 am
(JCSU to North Lots)

Student Cadets – South Campus

(775) 745-7505
Mon – Thur 6:00 pm – 12:15 pm
(Knowledge Center to 9th St.) Counseling Services: (775) 784-4648

Crisis Call Center

(24 Hours) (775) 784-8090
www.crisiscallcenter.org or Text “answer” to 839863

ASUN Legal Services

(775) 784-6132

Student Conduct

(775) 784-4388

University Police Services

Website: www.unr.edu/police
Sign up for Text Alerts: https://www.unr.edu/emergency/alerts


Timely Warnings

A Timely Warning is an alert that is issued to the entire campus community whenever a crime covered by the Clery Act poses a serious or continuing threat to the students, employees, or visitors to any University of Nevada, Reno locations. Timely Warnings are issued as soon as enough pertinent information is available and extends to all University properties covered by the Clery Act.

Procedure

Any crime or situation which may present a potential threat to the campus community is reported to the campus community as soon as possible. Examples may include, but are not limited to: shootings, sexual assaults, armed suspects possibly on campus or near campus, hostage situations, shots fired calls, hazardous chemical spills, etc. Reporting is to include campus buildings and facilities, non-campus buildings, property, and public property within or immediately adjacent to, and accessible from, the main campus. Properties may include buildings and/or property owned or controlled by student organizations that are officially recognized by the institutions or any building or property owned or controlled by the institution and used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution's educational purposes. Reporting requirements include properties which are frequently used by students which may or may not be within contiguous geographic proximity to the main campus.

Some examples of non-campus properties meeting the reporting requirements for a Timely Warning are: research facilities, university owned medical clinics, off campus student housing facilities owned by a third party (having written contracts with the university to provide student housing or other services, to include 2800 Enterprise, College Park, The Highlands) and institutionally owned research facilities.

The Assistant Vice President & Director of University Police Services or his/her designee may make the final determination of when a Timely Warning will be issued and disseminated, on a case by case basis.

When a Timely Warning is issued, it is the responsibility of the Assistant Vice President & Director of University Police Services or in his absence by the on scene Commander, to cause immediate notification to the representatives of the University President's Office, Vice President of Administration and Finance, the Student Services office, and Dispatch.

Determining whether to issue a Timely Warning will be evaluated on a case-by-case, taking into account both the frequency of the offense and the likelihood of additional occurrence.

Timely Warnings will contain the phrase “Timely Warning Notification”, in the subject line. The body of the alert may include a short description of the crime or incident giving the time and date, location, reported offense, suspect description, weapon used (if any), and suspect vehicle (if any) and method of operation (MO) used to facilitate the crime. The alert may also include personal safety information to aid members of the university community in protecting themselves from becoming victims of a similar crime and promote overall safety.

Methods of dissemination may include, but are not limited to, electronic distribution through mass email, text messaging, the department’s public safety radio station 1670 AM, outdoor notification system, posting of hard copies in public areas, posting on university and public safety web sites, voice mail recordings, campus monitors, reverse 911 and dissemination via local media outlets.

If appropriate, status updates as to the resolution and/or unfounded status of the crime or emergency situation will be similarly disseminated and updated as soon as possible.


Emergency Notifications

An Emergency Notification is an alert that may be issued whenever any significant emergency or dangerous situation poses an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees on the campus. This could overlap and include a Clery crime such as a shooting, but it also covers crimes not reportable under Clery as well as non-criminal incidents, such as an outbreak of a communicable illness, an impending weather emergency or a gas leak. Notifications are to be issued without delay upon confirmation of the emergency and may be tailored exclusively to the segment of the campus at risk.

Procedure

Any crime or situation which may present a potential threat to the campus community is reported to the campus community as soon as possible. Examples may include, but are not limited to: shootings, armed suspects possibly on campus or near campus, hostage situations, shots fired calls, hazardous chemical spills, etc. Reporting is to include campus buildings and facilities, non-campus buildings, property, and public property within or immediately adjacent to, and accessible from, the main campus. Properties may include buildings and/or property owned or controlled by student organizations that are officially recognized by the institutions or any building or property owned or controlled by the institution and used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution's educational purposes. Reporting requirements include properties which are frequently used by students which may or may not be within contiguous geographic proximity to the main campus.

The Assistant Vice President & Director of University Police Services or his/her designee may make the final determination of when a Timely Warning or an Emergency Notification will be issued and disseminated, on a case by case basis.

When an Emergency Notification is issued, it is the responsibility of the Assistant Vice President & Director of University Police Services or in his absence by the on scene Commander, to cause immediate notification to the representatives of the University President's Office, Vice President of Administration and Finance, the Student Services office, and Dispatch.

Determining whether to issue an Emergency Notification for non-Clery Act crimes will be evaluated on a case- by-case, taking into account both the frequency of the offense and the likelihood of additional occurrence.

Emergency Notifications may contain the phrase "Crime Alert" or "Emergency Notification", in the subject line. The body of the alert may include a short description of the crime or incident giving the time and date, location, reported offense, suspect description, weapon used (if any), and suspect vehicle (if any) and method of operation (MO) used to facilitate the crime. The alert may also include personal safety information to aid members of the university community in protecting themselves from becoming victims of a similar crime and promote overall safety.

Methods of dissemination may include, but are not limited to, electronic distribution through mass email, text messaging, the department’s public safety radio station 1670 AM, outdoor notification system, posting of hard copies in public areas, posting on university and public safety web sites, voice mail recordings, campus monitors, reverse 911 and dissemination via local media outlets.

If appropriate, status updates as to the resolution and/or unfounded status of the crime or emergency situation will be similarly disseminated and updated as soon as possible.


Emergency Text and Email Messaging System

The University of Nevada, Reno offers an emergency messaging system, Emergency Alerts, available to faculty, staff and students. The program sends a text and/or email message to all enrolled cell phones and email accounts in the event of an emergency at the University. The system is only used during an emergency or unexpected closing of the University.

Get started now or Manage Your Account: https://www.unr.edu/emergency/alerts

About the Service

As part of the University of Nevada, Reno’s emergency preparedness planning, students, faculty and staff can receive emergency text and email alerts in addition to traditional forms of notification. The University employs text and email messaging as another solution for communicating swiftly and effectively in the event of an extreme emergency on campus. You may receive a test message at least once per semester to ensure that the service is working as expected. The University will only use the service to send tests, emergency/life-threatening or unexpected campus closure alerts.

An Opt-Out Service

Students and employees are automatically entered into the system when registration and new employee information is collected and must opt-out if they do not wish to receive alerts. All participants need to update cell numbers and email addresses manually if their contact information changes. Students and employees will remain registered in the system until they leave school or terminate employment.

The service is provided at no additional fee from the University. Participants may need to pay for incoming text messages as part of their regular phone plan. Use of Emergency Alerts is rare as they are activated only in emergency situations.

More information

As with all methods of emergency communication, it is important to remember that Emergency Alerts are one of the many ways that the University contacts its campus community when an extreme emergency occurs on our campus.

Emergency Alerts complement emergency communications and University closure notifications already in place. Methods of dissemination may include, but are not limited to, electronic distribution through mass email, text messaging, the department’s public safety radio station 1670 AM, outdoor notification system, posting of hard copies in public areas, posting on university and public safety web sites, voice mail recordings, campus monitors, reverse 911 and dissemination via local media outlets.


Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures Statement

University Police Services receives information from various agencies on emergency or dangerous situations that may pose an immediate threat to the health or safety of the campus community. These include the Washoe County Emergency Management Office, Department of Emergency Management through the Department of Public Safety and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). In addition to these outside agencies, University Police Services works with the Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S).

University Police Services are usually the first responders in an emergency situation and work together with local agencies including paramedics, fire department, sheriff’s department and other local police agencies.

Emergency services at UNR

In the event of an actual emergency, the University may use several methods to communicate information quickly to the campus community. Methods of dissemination may include, but are not limited to, electronic distribution through mass email, text messaging, the department’s public safety radio station 1670 AM, outdoor notification system, posting of hard copies in public areas, posting on university and public safety web sites, voice mail recordings, campus monitors, reverse 911 and dissemination via local media outlets.

EH&S provides training on fire safety (prevention, use of fire extinguishers, and evacuation) and response to hazardous materials incidents (personnel exposures and spills). They prepare room and building-specific emergency response information to include door cards, hazardous materials inventory information and emergency evacuation maps. EH&S has developed more detailed emergency response procedures for incidents involving biological agents, chemicals, and radioactive materials which are contained in laboratory safety manuals. These are available on the EH&S web site. ( https://www.unr.edu/ehs)

Environmental Health & Safety

You can access the campus emergency information page, which contains the guidance listed in the emergency response guide at https://www.unr.edu/emergency/guide. Campus emergency response guide books have been developed and distributed across campus. Response procedures related to hazardous materials release and fire have also been developed by EH&S and are contained in the guide.


Procedures for Testing Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures

The University of Nevada, Reno participates in emergency tests and evacuation drills throughout the year and conducts follow-through activities to assess and evaluate emergency procedures. Drills are conducted to prepare building occupants for an evacuation in the case of an actual emergency. University Police Services coordinates announced and unannounced drills to test various procedural operations. Methods of dissemination may include, but are not limited to, electronic distribution through mass email, text messaging, the department’s public safety radio station 1670 AM, outdoor notification system, posting of hard copies in public areas, posting on university and public safety web sites, voice mail recordings, campus monitors, reverse 911 and dissemination via local media outlets. University Police Services monitors these drills in order to evaluate the response and prepare an after action report with information on systems that worked as assigned, systems that encountered problems and recommendations for improvement.

Residential Life conducts a fire drill within ten days after classes begin so that students can learn the locations of the emergency exits in the buildings. In coordinating with EH&S, the Director of Residential Life, Housing and Food Service also conducts fire safety training with all of the resident assistants (RAs) that live in the residence halls four times per year where they discuss fire evacuation procedures and identify the safe exits out of each building. Residential Life and EH&S monitor the drills in order to evaluate and assess the evacuation plans.


Missing Student Notification Policy

If a University Campus Security Authority has reason to believe that a student is missing, they shall immediately notify University Police Services at (775) 334-COPS(2677), whether or not the student lives on campus. Attempts to locate the student to determine his or her well-being will be made through the cooperation of University Police Services and Student Services.

University Police Services investigates all students reported as missing whether they live on or off-campus. If the student lives on campus, University Police Services will obtain authorization from Student Services to make entry into the student’s room for a welfare check and notify the Resident Director or Graduate Resident Director for the area in which the student is housed. The Resident Director or Graduate Resident Director should be directed to contact neighbors and friends in the immediate vicinity of the student’s room and report any findings to University Police Services. If the student is an off-campus resident, University Police Services will request the assistance of the neighboring police agency having jurisdiction, upon confirmation that a student is missing and cannot be located.

At the same time, University Police Services will attempt to ascertain the student’s whereabouts by contacting the student’s friends, associates and/or employers and inquire whether or not the student has been attending classes, labs, scheduled organizational or academic meetings or appearing for work. Verification of the student’s state of health and intention of returning to campus is made if located. If appropriate, a referral will be made to Student Services.

If the student is not located within 24 hours of receiving the initial report, notification of the family and local law enforcement is made to determine if they know the whereabouts of the student. If the student is an off-campus resident, family members or friends are encouraged to make a formal missing person report to the law enforcement agency with jurisdiction. University Police Services has MOUs in place with surrounding agencies for investigation of crimes.

If the missing student is under the age of 18 and is not an emancipated juvenile, University Police Services will notify the student’s parent or legal guardian immediately after it has been determined that the student has been missing for more than 24 hours. This does not preclude implementing these procedures in less than 24 hours if circumstances warrant a faster implementation.

University Police Services will cooperate and assist the primary investigating agency in all ways possible. If the student is an on-campus resident, University Police Services will commence an official investigation and will remain the primary investigative unit. Upon resolution of the missing person investigation, all parties previously contacted will be advised of the status of the case.

The University of Nevada, Reno strongly recommends all students register confidential contact information in the event that a student over the age of 18 years is determined missing for a period of more than 24 hours. All students have the option to confidentially designate someone to be contacted by University Police Services in the event the student is reported to be missing for more than 24 hours. If a student has designated such an individual, University Police Services will notify that person no later than 24 hours after the student is determined to be missing. Student missing person contact information is accessible only to authorized campus officials and may not be disclosed except to law enforcement personnel in furtherance of a missing person investigation. Students who wish to identify a confidential contact can do so through Admissions and Records during the application process.


Statement Addressing Security Awareness Programs

During orientation throughout the summer months, students are informed of services offered by University Police Services. Video and Power Point presentations outline ways to maintain personal safety and residence hall security. Students are told about crime on-campus and in surrounding neighborhoods. Similar information is presented to new employees.

Crime Prevention Programs are offered on a continual basis. Periodically during the academic year, University Police Services, in cooperation with other university organizations and departments, presents crime prevention awareness sessions on sexual assault (rape and acquaintance rape), drug and alcohol abuse, theft, and vandalism, as well as programs on personal safety and residence hall security. Students and employees are encouraged to be aware of their responsibility for their own security and the security of others.

The university provides safe ride options for persons working or studying on campus during the evening hours. These options are available at no cost. These services include ASUN campus escort for off campus transportation needs, available year round from 7:00 pm until 1:00 am, 7 days per week. Student cadets provide on campus transportation needs during the academic year from 6:00 pm until midnight, Monday through Thursday.

In addition, information is disseminated to students and employees through crime prevention awareness print materials, videos from our website, and through Facebook and Twitter feeds. When time is of the essence, information is released to the university community. Methods of dissemination may include, but are not limited to, electronic distribution through mass email, text messaging, the department’s public safety radio station 1670 AM, outdoor notification system, posting of hard copies in public areas, posting on university and public safety web sites, voice mail recordings, campus monitors, reverse 911 and dissemination via local media outlets. To sign up for emergency alerts, go to https://www.unr.edu/emergency/alerts.

Statement Addressing Crime Prevention Programs

University Police Services offers various personal safety, sexual assault prevention and crime prevention programs on a continual basis throughout the year. Police personnel facilitate programs for students, parents, faculty and new employees, student organizations, community organizations, in addition to programs for Housing Services Resident Advisors and residents providing a variety of educational strategies and tips on how to protect themselves from sexual assault, theft and other crimes. To sign up for programs, go to www.unr.edu/police/safety-and-training.

Available programs include:

  • Workplace Violence prevention
  • Threat Assessment
  • Personal Safety
  • Women’s Self Defense
  • Active Shooter
  • Workplace Security Site Assessments

Crime Prevention and Personal Safety Tips

We encourage you to be safe on our campus by making personal safety your number one priority. Awareness, Avoidance and Risk Reduction are the best ways to not be a victim. The following tips can be used on a daily basis:

  • If you are the victim of a crime, please report it to the police immediately.
  • Contact University Police Services by dialing (775) 334-COPS (2677) or 911 if you observe a suspicious person or situation.
  • If you know you are going to be studying and/or working late on campus, plan ahead to get home safely.
  • Never walk alone at night. Travel in groups of two or more and always travel in well-lit, heavily traveled areas.
  • Have a friend walk with you or meet you at a location the two of you can walk from safely. If you are alone, walk near other groups of people.
  • ALWAYS - ALWAYS lock your doors and windows.
  • Use Campus Escort by calling (775) 742-6808, or University Police Services by calling (775) 334-COPS (2677).
  • Tell someone where you are going and when you will return.
  • Carry a whistle or noise maker. This can serve as a reminder to exercise caution, and can alert someone in the area that you need help. Whistles are available free of charge at University Police Services Headquarters - ground floor of the Fitzgerald Student Services Building.
  • Be alert! Look around you; be aware of who is on the street and in the area. Make it difficult for anyone to take you by surprise.
  • If listening to music, keep the volume low so you can hear what is going on around you.
  • If you exercise at night or in the dark, do so with a friend and wear bright reflective clothing.
  • Follow your intuition... trust your feelings.
  • Download the SafePack app.

If you have any questions, concerns, or suggestions about our practices, policies, or the handling of a particular police matter, you are encouraged to contact University Police Services.

Download the Nevada Safe Pack App on your Smartphone


Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act

The University of Nevada, Reno has joined other colleges and universities across the nation in encouraging the elimination of alcohol and other drug abuse on our campus and in our community. The university believes that the unlawful possession or use of drugs, including alcohol, and the abuse of alcohol and any drug by students constitutes a grave threat to their physical and mental well-being, and significantly impedes the process of learning and personal development.

Substance Abuse Policy

The policy adopted by the university prohibits the use or possession of alcoholic beverages without authorization; use or possession of illegal and/or unauthorized drugs and drug paraphernalia; and providing alcoholic beverages to minors while on university property or at university-sponsored activities, and (2) being under the influence of a controlled substance, including alcohol, while on university property or at a university-sponsored activity and the exhibiting of offensive behavior while under the influence of alcohol or other controlled substances.

Substance Abuse Prevention Programs

In order to prevent and reduce alcohol-related problems, and to promote a drug-free and alcohol abuse-free campus, we have developed a comprehensive substance abuse prevention program, dedicated to the promotion of responsible and appropriate use of alcoholic beverages through a wide variety of educational activities, which are free to all participating students.

Alcohol Prevention and Education Programs, as sponsored by the Office of Student Conduct, provides outreach educational programs, including "BASICS for student groups", and co-sponsors alcohol-free student events, activities, and social opportunities on campus and through the sponsorship of programs by student organizations. The educational programs offered by the staff of the Office of Student Conduct support the following goals and activities for our students:

  • Identifying the values and attitudes related to drinking alcoholic beverages;
  • Recognizing personal and societal motives for choosing to drink;
  • Developing appropriate decision-making skills;
  • Information regarding the physiological and psychological effects of alcohol and of its potential effects on the individual and society;
  • Pamphlets, posters, films, and other information on alcohol and other drugs for student use and distribution;
  • Programs specifically tailored to campus living groups and student organizations, including fraternity and sorority chapters and university residence halls;
  • New Student Orientation programs and classroom presentations for classes, including First Year Experience courses;

For more information or to schedule a workshop for your group, please call the Office of Student Conduct, at: (775) 784-4388.

Treatment Programs

In addition to the above educational activities and services, the Office of Alcohol and Drug Intervention Services counselor-educators provide services for mandated student services for: intervention, assessment, confidential counseling, and referrals for in-depth treatment for alcohol-drug abuse. A counselor-educator may be reached for this mandated intervention programs at: (775) 784-4388.

For all students wishing to receive treatment services, who are not mandated (making a self-referral), the university offers confidential counseling on issues involving alcohol and other drugs through this same program, Alcohol and Drug Intervention Services, which may be contacted at phone: 784-4388 and/or in person at the Clark Administration Building, Lake Level Suites.

Campus Disciplinary Sanctions

A student involved in violations of university standards of conduct related to alcohol and other drugs will be required to participate in a disciplinary intervention process which may include referral to educational programs and/or an individual needs assessment as a condition of continued association with the institution.

The following disciplinary sanctions are presented as guidelines, indicating the range and the progression of sanctions-from educational programs through expulsion. These sanctions are applied on a case-by-case basis, depending on the specific nature of the student's alcohol and drug violation. Each student's case is evaluated in terms of that student's level of risk posed (health/danger to self and others) by his or her substance abuse.

Alcohol and Other Drugs

For violations of campus policy related to possession or use of alcohol or an illegal drug, the student will participate in an educational intervention program, including one of the following programs: BASICS, CASICS, STEPSS, and OnTRAC Student Drug Court. Each of these programs has been designed utilizing the guidelines of best practices for student development evidence-based research for treatment with the aid of a Licensed Drug and Alcohol Counselor. An overview of these programs is, as follows:

BASICS - Brief Alcohol Screening Intervention for College Students
An educational program designed to assist mild to moderate alcohol abusers and/or policy violators in correcting behavior through enforcement and instruction.

CASICS - Cannabis Screening Intervention for College Students
An educational program designed to assist first-time student violations of our University substance abuse policy for possession/use of marijuana in correcting the student's behavior through enforcement and instruction.

STEPSS - Substance Abuse Treatment & Educational Programs for Student Success
A program that combines education and treatment approaches and addresses student decision-making and life skills. This program is designed for students having a second alcohol violation and for students involved in a first time substance abuse violation for illegal drugs.

OnTRAC Student Drug Court - Treatment, Responsibility, Accountability on Campus
A comprehensive drug court style of educational and treatment program, designed for students in need of a highly structured intervention plan, due to the student's serious level of dependency on alcohol or illegal drugs, and/or the student's repeated drug and alcohol violations. This is an individualized program that combines treatment with student academic success strategies, and involves alcohol and other drug randomized testing throughout the student's participation in the program.

Eligibility for these programs is limited to those individuals enrolled at the University of Nevada, Reno, who are involved in substance-related misconduct and referred by the Office of Student Conduct and Residential Life, or self-referral by the student himself/herself. We have actively encouraged students involved in the criminal process to seek referrals to these programs from the court, when applicable to the resolution in court.

In addition to education and treatment interventions, the student may be sanctioned with the following activities and disciplinary sanctions:

  1. Drug and/or alcohol assessment
  2. Residence hall and/or campus disciplinary probation
  3. Residence hall license cancellation
  4. Community Service or research project
  5. Disciplinary Suspension
  6. University Expulsion

For violations involving sale of illegal drugs, the student's housing and student status at the university will be reviewed, and one or more of the following sanctions will be invoked:

  1. Residence halls license cancellation
  2. Disciplinary Suspension
  3. University Expulsion

Legal Standards

In addition to university student conduct standards, a student will be subjected to all local, state, and federal laws related to substance abuse or the possession/use of alcohol. The following state laws apply to any student conduct on or off campus. In these instances, the student is being regarded as a resident of the state of Nevada.

NRS 202.020

Purchase, consumption or possession of alcoholic beverage by a minor: Any person under 21 years of age who, for any reason, possesses any alcoholic beverage in public is guilty of a misdemeanor.

NRS 202.040

False representation by a minor to obtain intoxicating liquor. Every minor who shall falsely represent him/herself to be 21 years of age in order to obtain any intoxicating liquor shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

NRS 202.055

Sale or furnishing of alcoholic beverage to a minor: aiding a minor to purchase or procure alcoholic beverage. Every person who knowingly sells, gives, or otherwise furnishes an alcoholic beverage to any person under 21 years of age...is guilty of a misdemeanor.

NRS 205.460

Preparation, transfer, or use of false identification regarding persons under 21 years of age; (1) Every person who counterfeits, forges, alters, erases, or obliterates, or...(2) Every person under the age of 21 years who uses or attempts to use or proffers any counterfeited, forged, erased or obliterated card, writing paper, document, or any photocopy print, photostat, or other replica thereof...for the purpose and with the intention of purchasing alcoholic liquor or being served alcoholic liquor...or entering gambling establishments...shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

Legal Sanctions

Legal action provides for sanctions ranging from the imposition of fines to incarceration. Legal sanctions are governed by the Nevada Revised Statutes (NRS) and applicable federal law. Such penalties result from the referral of an alcohol or other drug violation which comes to the attention of University Police Services, and is referred to the District Attorney's Office. Legal action may take place concurrently with campus disciplinary action.


Policy Statement Addressing Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking

The University of Nevada, Reno is a diverse community committed to creating and maintaining a safe campus where all persons who participate in University programs and activities can work and learn together in an atmosphere free of all forms of harassment, discrimination, or intimidation. Sexual harassment, sexual assault/sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking are violations of University Policy.

The University of Nevada, Reno will respond promptly to reports of sexual harassment, sexual assault/sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. The University will take appropriate action to prevent, correct, and when necessary, to discipline conduct that violates Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) policy.

The policy in its entirety may be found in the Board of Regents Handbook (Title 4, Chapter 8, Section 13): Policy Against Discrimination of Sexual Harassment: Complaint Procedure.

Definition of Terms

Sexual Assault

Sexual Assault means a person subjects another person to sexual penetration, or forces another person to make a sexual penetration on himself or herself or another, or on a beast, against the will of the victim or under conditions in which the perpetrator knows or should know that the victim is mentally or physically incapable of resisting or understanding the nature of his or her conduct.

Dating Violence

Dating Violence is an act committed by a person who is or has been in a “dating relationship” with the reporting party:

  1. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the “Dating relationship” means frequent, intimate associations primarily characterized by the expectation of affection or sexual involvement. The term does not include a casual relationship or an ordinary association between persons in a business or social context; and

  2. For the purpose of this definition:

    Dating violence is committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the reporting party.

    Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, mental, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.

    Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

    For the purpose of complying with the requirements of this Section and 34 CFR 668.41, any incident meeting this definition is considered a crime for the purpose of Clery Act reporting.

Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence is an act that includes but is not limited to violence that occurs when a person commits one of the following acts against or upon the person’s spouse or former spouse, any other person to whom the person is related by blood or marriage, any other person with whom the person is or was actually residing, any other person with whom the person has had or is having a dating relationship, any other person with whom the person has a child in common, the minor child of any of those persons, the person’s minor child or any other person who has been appointed the custodian or legal guardian for the person’s minor child:

  1. A battery
  2. An assault
  3. Compelling the other person by force or threat of force to perform an act from which the other person has the right to refrain or to refrain from an act which the other person has the right to perform
  4. A sexual assault
  5. A knowing, purposeful or reckless course of conduct intended to harass the other person. Such conduct may include, but is not limited to:
    1. Stalking
    2. Arson
    3. Trespassing
    4. Larceny
    5. Destruction of private property
    6. Carrying a concealed weapon without a permit
    7. Injuring or killing an animal
  6. A false imprisonment
  7. Unlawful entry of the other person’s residence, or forcible entry against the other person’s will if there is a reasonably foreseeable risk of harm to the other person from the entry.

Stalking

Stalking is defined to be when a person who, without lawful authority, willfully or maliciously engages in a course of conduct that would cause a reasonable person to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, harassed or fearful for the immediate safety of a family or household member, and that actually causes the victim to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, harassed or fearful for the immediate safety of a family or household member. Stalking includes but is not limited to:

  1. Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:
    1. Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
    2. Suffer substantial emotional distress
  2. For the purpose of this definition:
    1. Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s proptery.
    2. Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.
    3. Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.

Coercion

Coercion is:

  • the use of violence or threats of violence against a person or the person’s family or property;
  • depriving or hindering a person in the use of any tool, implement or clothing;
  • attempting to intimidate a person by threats or force, or
  • when committed with the intent to compel a person to do or abstain from doing an act that the person has the right to do or abstain from doing.

In the context of sexual misconduct, coercion is the use of pressure to compel another individual to initiate or continue sexual activity against an individual’s will. Coercion can include a wide range of behaviors, including intimidation, manipulation, threats, and blackmail. A person’s words or conduct are sufficient to constitute coercion if they impair another individual’s freedom of will and ability to choose whether or not to engage in sexual activity. Examples of coercion include threatening to “out” someone based on sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression and threatening to harm oneself if the other party does not engage in the sexual activity.

Consent

Consent is defined as:

  • An affirmative, clear, unambiguous, knowing, informed, and voluntary agreement between all participants to engage in sexual Consent is active, not passive. Silence or lack of resistance cannot be interpreted as consent. Seeking and having consent accepted is the responsibility of the person(s) initiating each specific sexual act regardless of whether the person initiating the act is under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol.
  • The existence of a dating relationship or past sexual relations between the participants does not constitute consent to any other sexual act.
  • The definition of consent does not vary based upon a participant’s sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.
  • Affirmative consent must be ongoing throughout the sexual activity and may be withdrawn at any time. When consent is withdrawn or cannot be given, sexual activity must stop.
  • Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated. Incapcitation occurs when an individual lacks the ability to fully, knowingly choose to participate in sexual activity. Incapacitation includes impairment due to drugs or alcohol (whether such use is voluntary or involuntary); inability to communicate due to a mental or physical condition; the lack of consciousness or being asleep; being involuntarily restrained; if any of the parties are under the age of 16; or if an individual otherwise cannot consent.
  • Consent cannot be given when it is the result of any coercion, intimidation, force, or threat of harm.

Complaint and Investigation Procedure

This section provides the complaint and investigation procedure for complaints of discrimination or sexual harassment, including sexual violence (except that complaints against students may be referred to student disciplinary processes)2. The Chancellor (for the System Office) and each president shall designate no fewer than two administrators to receive complaints. The administrators designated to receive the complaints may include the following: (1) the Title IX coordinator; (2) the affirmative action officer; (3) the human resources officer; or (4) any other officer designated by the president. The president shall also designate a primary investigating officer (primary officer) to process all complaints. The primary officer may be any of the individuals identified in this paragraph. All complaints, whether received by the affirmative action officer, human resources officer or other designated officer, must immediately be forwarded to the primary officer. All Title IX complaints must be immediately forwarded to the Title IX coordinator.

An individual filing a complaint of alleged discrimination or sexual harassment shall have the opportunity to select an independent advisor for assistance, support, and advice and shall be notified of this opportunity by the primary officer, or the primary officer’s designee. It shall be the choice of the individual filing the complaint to utilize or not utilize the independent advisor. The independent advisor may be brought into the process at any time at the request of the complainant. The means and manner by which an independent advisor shall be made available shall be determined by each institution or unit.

An individual against whom a complaint of alleged discrimination or sexual harassment is filed shall have the opportunity to select an independent advisor for assistance, support, and advice and shall be notified of this opportunity by the primary officer, or by the primary officer’s designee. It shall be the choice of the individual against whom the complaint is filed to utilize or not utilize the independent advisor. The independent advisor may be brought into the process at any time at the request of the respondent. The means and manner by which an independent advisor shall be made available shall be determined by each institution or unit.

The individual filing a complaint of sexual harassment and the individual against whom a complaint is filed must be provided with a written explanation of their rights and options, including the available interim measures, and written notification of services available to victims on campus and in the community.

If anyone in a supervisory, managerial, administrative or executive role or position, such as a supervisor, department chair, or director of a unit, receives a complaint of alleged discrimination or sexual harassment, or observes or becomes aware of conduct that may constitute discrimination or sexual harassment, the person must immediately contact one of the individuals identified in this section above to forward the complaint, to discuss it and/or to report the action taken. Title IX complaints must be immediately provided to the Title IX coordinator.

Complaints of discrimination or sexual harassment should be filed as soon as possible with the supervisor, department chair, dean, or one of the administrators listed in this section above and/or designated by the president to receive complaints of alleged sexual harassment or discrimination.

Employees

  1. An employee who believes that he or she has been subjected to discrimination or sexual harassment by anyone is encouraged—but it is neither necessary nor required, particularly if it may be confrontational—to promptly tell the person that the conduct is unwelcome and ask the person to stop the conduct. An employee is not required to do this before filing a A person who receives such a request must immediately comply with it and must not retaliate against the employee.
  2. The employee may file a discrimination or sexual harassment complaint with his or her immediate supervisor, who will in turn immediately contact one of the officials listed in Section D above.
  3. If the employee feels uncomfortable about discussing the incident with the immediate supervisor, the employee should feel free to bypass the supervisor and file a complaint with one of the other listed officials or with any other supervisor.
  4. After receiving any employee’s complaint of an incident of alleged discrimination or sexual harassment, the supervisor will immediately contact any of the individuals listed in Section D above to forward the complaint, to discuss it and/or to report the action taken. The supervisor has a responsibility to act even if the individuals involved do not report the complaint to that supervisor.

Students

  1. A student who believes that he or she has been subjected to discrimination or sexual harassment by anyone is encouraged—but it is neither necessary nor required particularly if it may be confrontational—to promptly tell the person that the conduct is unwelcome and ask the person to stop the conduct. A student is not required to do this before filing a complaint. A person who receives such a request must immediately comply with it and must not retaliate against the student.
  2. The student may file a complaint with his or her major department chair or director of an administrative unit, who will in turn immediately contact one of the officials listed in Section D above.
  3. If the student feels uncomfortable about discussing the incident with the department chair or director of an administrative unit, the student should feel free to bypass the person and file a complaint with one of the above officials in Section D or to any chair, dean, or director of an administrative unit who will in turn immediately contact one of the officials listed above in Section D to forward the complaint, to discuss it and/or to report the action taken. The chair, dean or director of an administrative unit has a responsibility to act even if the individuals involved do not report to that person.

Non-Employees and Non-Students

Individuals who are neither NSHE employees nor NSHE students and who believe they have been subjected to discrimination or sexual harassment by a NSHE employee during the employee’s work hours or by a NSHE student on campus or at a NSHE-sponsored event may utilize any of the complaint processes set forth above in this Section D.

Training, Investigation and Resolution

  1. General Requirements: The Title IX coordinator, executives, administrators designated to receive complaints, primary officer or designee, and appropriate management with decision-making authority shall have training or experience in handling discrimination and sexual misconduct complaints, and in the operation of the NSHE and Nevada Administrative Code disciplinary procedures.
  2. Primary Prevention and Awareness Training: Institutions must offer new students and new employees primary prevention and awareness training that promotes awareness of rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking as defined in this policy. The training must address safe and positive options for bystander intervention to prevent harm or intervene in risky situations and the recognition of abusive behavior and how to avoid potential attacks.
  3. Special Training With Regard to Sexual Violence: The training for each of the individuals identified in paragraph 4.a above, should include annual training on how to investigate and conduct hearings in a manner that protects the safety of complainants and promotes accountability; information on working with and interviewing persons subjected to sexual violence; information on particular types of conduct that would constitute sexual violence, including stalking and same-sex sexual violence; the proper standard of review for sexual violence complaints (preponderance of the evidence); information on risk reduction; information on consent and the role drugs or alcohol can play in the ability to consent; the importance of accountability for individuals found to have committed sexual violence; the need for remedial actions for the respondent, complainant, and institution community; how to determine credibility; how to evaluate evidence and weigh it in an impartial manner; how to conduct investigations; confidentiality; the effects of trauma, including neurobiological change; and cultural awareness training regarding how sexual violence may impact students differently depending on their cultural backgrounds.
  4. Investigation: After receiving a complaint of the incident or behavior, the primary officer, or designee, will initiate an investigation to gather information about the incident. If the primary officer is unable to initiate an investigation, due to a conflict or for any other reason, the president shall designate another individual to act as primary officer for the matter. Each institution may set guidelines for the manner in which an investigation shall be conducted. The guidelines shall provide for the prompt, thorough, impartial, and equitable investigation and resolution of complaints, and shall identify the appropriate management level with final decision-making authority. The guidelines shall, at a minimum, provide the person subject to the complaint with information as to the nature of the complaint, and shall further provide that the person filing the complaint and the person who is the subject of the complaint have equal rights to be interviewed, identify witnesses and provide documentation pertaining to the complaint. In most cases, an investigation should be completed within 45 calendar days of receipt of the complaint.
  5. Standard of Review: The standard for evaluating complaints shall be a preponderance of the evidence (i.e., the evidence establishes that it is more likely than not that the prohibited conduct occurred). At the completion of the investigation, findings and a recommendation will be made to the appropriate management regarding the resolution of the matter. The recommendation is advisory only.
  6. Management Determination: After the recommendation has been made, a determination will be made by appropriate management regarding the resolution of the matter. If warranted, disciplinary action up to and including involuntary termination or expulsion will be taken. Any such disciplinary action shall be taken, as applicable, in accordance with NSHE Code Chapter 6, Chapter 8 or Chapter 10 (or applicable Student Code of Conduct), or, in the case of classified employees, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) Chapter 284, or in the case of DRI technologists, the Technologists Manual. Other appropriate actions will be taken to correct problems and remedy effects, if any, caused by the conduct, if appropriate. If proceedings are initiated under Title 2, Chapter 6, Chapter 8 or Chapter 10, the applicable Student Code of Conduct, the NAC Chapter 284, or Technologists Manual, the investigation conducted pursuant to this policy may be used as part of such investigations. The administrative officer, in his or her discretion, may also supplement the investigation with additional investigation. In any disciplinary hearings conducted pursuant to a Student Code of Conduct or under Title 2, Chapter 6, Chapter 8, Chapter 10, the NAC Chapter 284, or Technologists Manual, the standard of evidence shall be by a preponderance of the evidence, (i.e., the evidence establishes that it is more likely than not that the prohibited conduct occurred). In connection with any such disciplinary hearings, the person filing the complaint and the person who is the subject of the complaint have equal rights to be interviewed, identify witnesses, and provide and receive documentation and witness lists pertaining to the complaint, and if an appeal is provided, to appeal the decision.
  7. Parties to be Informed: After the appropriate management has made a determination regarding the resolution of the matter, and depending on the circumstances, both parties may be informed concurrently of the resolution (see subparagraph i below).
  8. Confidentiality of Actions: In the event actions are taken against an individual under NSHE Code Title 2, Chapter 6, Chapter 8 or Chapter 10 (or applicable Student Code of Conduct) or NAC Chapter 284, or the Technologists Manual, such matters generally remain confidential under those sections, except that final decisions following hearings or appeals of professional employees and State of Nevada personnel hearings involving classified employees are public records. Student matters generally remain confidential under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. §1232g, 34 CFR Part 99 (FERPA).
  9. Crime of Violence Exception to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA): When discriminatory conduct or sexual harassment involves a crime of violence or a non-forcible sexual offense, FERPA permits the institution to disclose to the complainant the final results (limited to the name of the respondent, any violation found to have been committed, and any sanction imposed) of a disciplinary proceeding against the respondent, regardless of whether the institution concluded that a violation was committed. With respect to an institutional disciplinary proceeding alleging sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking offense, the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, 20 U.S.C. §1092 (f). 34 CFR 668.46 (Clery Act) requires that the accuser and the accused must be simultaneously informed of the outcome.
  10. Disclosure of Sanction Imposed: In the event a student is found to have engaged in sexual harassment of another student, the institution shall disclose to the student who was harassed, information about the sanction imposed on the student who was found to have engaged in harassment when the sanction directly relates to the harassed student.
  11. Resignation of Employee or Withdrawal of Student: If a student respondent withdraws from the institution or an employee respondent ends employment (e.g., resigns, retires) while an investigation of a complaint involving gender discrimination or sexual harassment is pending under this policy, the Title IX coordinator shall take appropriate action, which may include completing the investigation to the extent reasonably practicable, in order to prevent the reoccurrence of and to remedy the effects of the alleged misconduct.
  12. Title IX Coordinator Monitoring: The institution Title IX coordinator has primary responsibility for coordinating the institution’s efforts to comply with and carry out its responsibilities under Title IX. The Title IX coordinator is responsible for monitoring all aspects of the investigation and any disciplinary process to help ensure that:
    1. the process is fair and equitable to both the complainant and the respondent;
    2. the applicable policies and procedures of NSHE and of the institution are followed; and
    3. the interim measures and final remedies are followed

Remedies and Interim Measures

It may be necessary or advisable to take actions (as determined by the institution) designed to minimize the chance that the respondent will either continue to harass or retaliate against the complainant and to provide additional support to the complainant. Such actions (as determined by the institution) may also be necessary or advisable on behalf of a respondent. The measures themselves must not amount to retaliation against the complainant or the respondent. Depending on the specific nature of the problem, interim measures and final remedies may include, but are not limited to:

For Students:

  • Issuing a no contact directive;
  • Providing an effective escort to ensure safe movement between classes and activities;
  • Not sharing classes or extracurricular activities;
  • Moving to a different residence hall (complainants should only be moved upon their request);
  • Providing written information regarding institution and community services including but not limited to medical, counseling and academic support services, such as tutoring;
  • Providing extra time to complete or re-take a class or withdraw from a class without an academic or financial penalty;
  • Restricting to online classes;
  • Providing information regarding campus transportation options;
  • Reviewing any disciplinary actions taken against the complainant to see if there is a connection between the sexual violence and the misconduct that may have resulted in the complainant being disciplined; and
  • Requiring the parties to report any violations of these restrictions

For Employees:

  • Provide an effective escort to ensure safe movement between work area and/or parking lots/other campus locations;
  • Issuing a no contact directive;
  • Placement on paid leave (not sick or annual leave);
  • Placement on administrative leave;
  • Transfer to a different area/department or shift in order to eliminate or reduce further business/social contact;
  • Providing information regarding campus transportation options;
  • Instructions to stop the conduct;
  • Providing information regarding institution and community services including medical, counseling and Employee Assistance Program;
  • Reassignment of duties;
  • Changing the supervisory authority; and
  • Directing the parties to report any violations of these restrictions.

Interim measures and final remedies may include restraining orders, or similar lawful orders issued by the institution, criminal, civil or tribal courts. Interim measures and final remedies will be confidential to the extent that such confidentiality will not impair the effectiveness of such measures or remedies.

Final remedies may also include review and revision of institution sexual misconduct policies, increased monitoring, supervision or security at locations where incidents have been reported; and increased and/or targeted education and prevention efforts.

Any interim measures or final remedies shall be monitored by the Title IX coordinator throughout the entire process to assess whether the interim measures or final remedies meet the goals of preventing ongoing harassment or discrimination, protecting the safety of the parties and preventing retaliatory conduct.


Procedures for Reporting Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault or Stalking

If you have been sexually assaulted, get help immediately.

Get to a safe place and call a friend or family member for support, or call the Crisis Call line at (775) 784-8090. Call the police at 911 (on-campus phones, 9-911) Tell the police dispatcher that you are a university student so that University Police Services will be contacted and you may be provided with immediate assistance and evidence can be collected.

You should go to a hospital emergency room for medical treatment and evidence collection (transportation to the hospital may be provided by University Police Services or other local Police if desired). The hospital will call the Crisis Call’s Sexual Assault Support Team representative who will meet you at the hospital to provide you with support and answer questions about the investigation process and your rights as the survivor of a sexual assault. Remember that you do not have to decide at this point whether or not to report the incident, but it is important for you to get medical attention.

In order to better preserve evidence, you should try to fight the urge to shower, bathe, douche, change clothes or straighten up the area since these activities will destroy evidence that you may need.

All reports will be investigated by the university. Violations of the law will be referred to University Police Services and when appropriate, to the staff of the Office of Student Conduct for investigation and resolution through the student conduct system, when the alleged violator is an enrolled student.

Off-Campus Counselors and Advocates

Off-campus counselors, advocates, and health care providers will also generally maintain confidentiality and not share information with the university unless the reporting student requests the disclosure and signs a consent or waiver form.

Following is contact information for these off-campus resources:

Crisis Call Center: (775) 784-8090 (Reno)
24 hour statewide Help Hotline: (800) 992-5757 info@crisiscallcenter.org

NOTE: While these off-campus counselors and advocates may maintain a reporting student’s confidentiality with regard to the university, they may have reporting or other obligations under state law. For example, there may be an obligation to report child abuse, an immediate threat of harm to self or others, or to report in the case of hospitalization for mental illness; for the exceptions to confidentiality, see NRS 49.213, NRS 49.245, and NRS 432B.220 in Appendix 2.

If you have questions as to whether a specific incident should be reported, please contact University Police Services at (775) 784-4013 or e-mail unrpd@police.unr.edu.


Title IX Information

If you believe you have been subjected to sex or gender-based discrimination and/or unwelcome sexual advances, sexual coercion, requests for sexual favors, and/or sexually motivated physical, verbal, or nonverbal conduct, other conduct of a sexual nature, or interpersonal violence, there are campus resources and services available to you. The university will also implement interim measures to ensure the safety and well-being of those who have been subjected to this behavior. Please immediately contact:

Title IX Coordinator

UNR Equal Opportunity and Title IX
Continuing Education Building
(775) 784-1547
(Sexual Assault Hotline: (775) 784-1030)

If you have been sexually assaulted or someone has
attempted to sexually assault you, immediately contact: University
Police Services
911 or (775) 334-COPS (2677)

The University of Nevada, Reno, strictly prohibits sexual harassment and discrimination. Sexual harassment in educational institutions is a form of sex-based discrimination prohibited by Titles VII and IX. Sexual harassment involves conduct of a sexual nature that is unwelcome and offensive to both the recipient and a reasonable person. Sexual harassment can interfere with a student’s academic performance, an employee’s work performance and their emotional and physical well-being.


Student Code of Conduct – Authority

NSHE Code 10.1 authorizes the University of Nevada, Reno, to establish this Code of Conduct. The President of the University of Nevada, Reno, through the Vice President for Student Services, will designate appropriate individuals or entities to administer the University student disciplinary system.

The Director of Student Conduct has been designated to represent the University in student disciplinary matters for undergraduate and graduate students in all campus degree programs with the exception of those students enrolled in the University of Nevada School of Medicine, which has authority for providing student conduct standards and disciplinary procedures for its students. The Director of Student Conduct will be responsible for the coordination of the activities of the University student discipline system for the remainder of the University of Nevada, Reno, campus and will report to the Vice President for Student Services or his/her designee. The administrative faculty members in the Office of Student Conduct and of the Office of Housing, Residential Life and Food Services shall be responsible for monitoring student compliance with all discipline conditions and sanctions imposed through the disciplinary process and shall maintain all official student disciplinary records.

The scope of authority of the University extends to persons identified as students because of their status as enrolled in the institution on a part-time, full-time, or auditing basis. This scope of authority also extends to persons with a continued intent to pursue an education at the University of Nevada, Reno, which includes, but is not limited to the following: persons participating in orientation programs, persons participating in early-start programs, and incidents involving current students that occur between terms and during vacation periods.

Every student shall be responsible for his or her conduct from the time of application for admission through the actual awarding of a degree, even when conduct occurs before classes begin or after classes end, such as during periods between terms.

The Student Code of Conduct shall apply to a student's conduct even if the student withdraws from school while a disciplinary case is pending. When a student leaves the University, any unresolved complaints of alleged student misconduct will be reviewed and addressed upon the student's return. If there were circumstances involving a student graduate of the University who is found to have been involved in action, which directly affects the status of his or her degree and/or the University community, then the University would invoke its authority to resolve the incident through a review of, and possible action to modify, the student's status and record.

The authority of the University to address student conduct concerns involves all students while they are: present on premises owned by the University, in off-campus buildings used by students through their association with a student organization recognized by the university, or at another site for an academic or extracurricular University- related experience. This authority extends to off-campus conduct that adversely affects the University community and /or the pursuit of its objectives, and where it adversely affects the health, safety, or security of any member of the University.

  1. Complaint of Student Misconduct:

    Any member of the university community may file a complaint against a student for violations of the Student Code of Conduct. The complaint shall be prepared in writing and directed to the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct. Any complaint should be submitted as soon as possible after the alleged violation takes place, preferably within 30 days.

  2. Resolution of a Student Misconduct Complaint:

    1. The Assistant Dean, Student Conduct or designee, (hereafter Student Conduct Administrator) will review and investigate the complaint to determine if the information indicates actions which violate the Student Code of Upon determining that a complaint does indicate violation(s) of the Student Code of Conduct, the Student Conduct Administrator, shall send the accused student a notice of allegation(s). The notice will present information obtained from the investigation, identify the alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct, and instruct the student to schedule a conduct conference within 10 days of the notice.
      1. The notice may be hand delivered or mailed by regular United States mail to the student's address as identified within MYNEVADA. All mailed letters are considered delivered as of the United States Postal Service postdate.
      2. Students failing to respond to the notice will be sent a second notice via certified Second notices may include forewarning that an administrative hold will be placed on the accused student's transcripts and/or ability to register until such time that the student participates in the mandated conduct conference.
      3. Interim Directive—In appropriate circumstances, the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct may Impose an interim "No Contact" and/or "ban from participation" directive prior to a conduct The Assistant Dean, Student Conduct may issue such a directive when the alleged misconduct poses a health and safety concern and/or a disruption to the educational environment.
    2. Informal Resolution of the Complaint:

      The accused student shall attend a conduct conference and work with the Student Conduct Administrator to develop an appropriate informal resolution of the charges. In some cases, the accused student and the Student Conduct Administrator may "informally" resolve the complaint through agreement of responsibility, termination of allegations, mediation, conflict resolution, or educational conference. If the accused student and Student Conduct Administrator cannot reach agreement through informal resolution the complaint will be referred to the formal resolution process. An accused student has the right to request participation in the formal resolution process for a complaint of misconduct at any time during the informal resolution process.

    3. Formal Resolution of the Complaint:

      The formal resolution of a complaint of student misconduct shall take place when an accused student does not agree to informal resolution by not accepting responsibility for a charge of misconduct, or by not accepting the sanctions proposed for resolution of misconduct. The formal resolution process involves a hearing before a student conduct board or a student conduct hearing officer. The accused student shall schedule a conference with the Student Conduct Administrator within ten days of the decision to initiate the formal resolution process.

      The purpose of the conference will be to:

      1. Identify and determine the most appropriate hearing option to be employed
      2. Review the hearing process and procedures
      3. Set a hearing date and time
        1. The hearing shall occur within twenty-five days but no less than ten days from the conference.
        2. Maximum time limits for scheduling of student conduct hearings may be extended in writing at the discretion of the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct.


    4. Impaneling a Board or Hearing Officer:

      The Assistant Dean, Student Conduct determines which Hearing Board or Student Conduct Hearing Officer will hear each case based on the alleged misconduct, the level of sanction(s) that may be considered and the needs of the accused student, alleged victim and campus community as a whole.

      Student Conduct Hearing Officer:

      A Student Conduct Hearing Officer will be appointed from faculty members within the Office of Student Conduct, the Office of Residential Life, Housing and Food Services or trained University community members who will be responsible to the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct, and ultimately to the Vice President for Student Services, for all student conduct activities and decisions. The Student Conduct Hearing Officer hears cases involving students, student organizations or groups accused of violating the Student Code of Conduct. Whether a Student Conduct Hearing Officer will hear the matter rather than a Student Conduct Board will be determined by the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct. The Student Conduct Hearing Officer will be advised by an appointed Student Conduct Administrator not involved in the investigation or resolution of the alleged misconduct being heard by the officer.

      Student Conduct Board:

      The Student Conduct Board hears cases involving students, student organizations or groups accused of violating the Student Code of Conduct. The board is comprised of trained University students and faculty members. The composition of the Student Conduct Board (student and/or faculty membership) for each hearing will be determined by the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct. Those hearings in which the potential for suspension, expulsion or loss of recognition are being considered will include faculty membership. The Student Conduct Board will be advised by an appointed Student Conduct Administrator not involved in the investigation or resolution of the alleged misconduct being heard by the board.

    5. Student conduct hearings shall be conducted according to the following procedures:
      1. Student conduct hearings shall be closed unless the accused student requests an open hearing.
        1. Disciplinary records, to include hearing proceedings, are part of a student's educational record. As such the privacy protections afforded to a student under the Federal Education Right to Privacy Act dictate the standards for a closed hearing.
        2. Requests by an accused student for an open hearing will be reviewed by the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct. Such requests will be granted if he overriding individual privacy needs of other students involved in the hearing are not violated, nor the hearing process itself.
      2. The accused student has the right to be assisted by an advisor, as does the complainant, if desired. The advisor serves as a supporter and advisor during the conduct hearing. The accused student and the complainant are both responsible for presenting their own information, introducing witnesses, and answering questions throughout the hearing. When a student selects an advisor, in this process the advisor has no right to speak during the hearing. The advisor may be an attorney. If the advisor is an attorney, the Student Conduct Administrator must be informed five college working days before the hearing. The Assistant Dean, Student Conduct has sole discretion to allow for a delay in the hearing due to a scheduling conflict of an advisor. The hearing will run according to the university schedule and will not be delayed by another process off campus, unless in the discretion of the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct, such delay is deemed to be in the best interests of the parties or process.
      3. The accused student(s), the complainant and any advisors shall be allowed to attend all portions of the hearing, at which information is received, but may not be present during deliberations. Admission of any other person to the student conduct hearing shall be at the discretion of the student conduct board or hearing officer and/or the student conduct administrator.
      4. In student conduct hearings involving more than one accused student, the Student Conduct Administrator, in his or her discretion, may permit the student conduct hearings to be conducted either separately or jointly.
      5. The accused student and complainant must notify the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct of witnesses no later than five college working days before the The Hearing Board Advisor will notify and invite to the hearing potential witnesses d. who are members of the university community, and who are identified by the accused student and/or complainant at least two college working days prior to the hearing. The Assistant Dean, Student Conduct has sole discretion to allow for a delay in the hearing due to a scheduling conflict of a witness. Witnesses will provide information to, and answer questions from, the student conduct board or hearing officer. To avoid confrontational situations during the hearing, the accused student and/or complainant shall verbally direct questions for the witness(es) to the chairperson of the conduct board or the hearing officer, who will then question the witness directly. The chairperson of the conduct board or the hearing officer will decide on the specific course of questioning and/or information sharing throughout the hearing.
      6. The accused student and complainant may present pertinent written statements, records, or other information for the hearing. These documents must be provided to the Hearing Board Advisor or hearing officer five college working days before the hearing.
      7. The accused student and the complainant have the right to review these documents two working days prior to the hearing. This review will take place within the Office of Student Conduct during normal working hours under the supervision of the Hearing Board Advisor. All documents are considered confidential and will not be reproduced or released for review outside of the Office of Student Conduct.
      8. The members of the student conduct board or the hearing officer shall deliberate after the hearing has concluded and shall determine whether or not the accused student has violated each section of the Student Code that the student is charged with having violated. This determination is made through consensus if possible, and if not possible, then by a simple majority vote of the board members.
      9. The student conduct board or hearing officer's determination shall be made on the basis of a preponderance of the evidence: whether it is more likely than not that the accused student violated the Student Code of Conduct.
      10. If the accused student is not found responsible for a violation, then the hearing is concluded. If the accused student is found responsible for one or more violations of the Student Code of Conduct, then the student conduct board or the hearing officer shall consider possible sanctions for the student after reviewing any prior violations of the Student Code of Conduct, the imposed sanctions and the completion of these sanctions. Possible sanctions to impose appear below in Section D. Sanctions.
      11. Order of processes in a hearing shall be:
        1. In the hearing, the chair of the board or hearing officer will state the content of the report of alleged misconduct and the specific charges made.
        2. The complainant will be asked to present information supporting the allegation of misconduct against the accused student.
        3. The chair of the board or hearing officer may call identified witnesses on behalf of the complainant.
        4. The accused student and board members may question the complainant and witnesses.
        5. The accused student will be asked to present information supporting his or her position against the allegation of misconduct.
        6. The chair of the board or hearing officer may call identified witnesses on behalf of the accused student.
        7. The complainant and board members may question the accused student and witnesses.
        8. The board members, or hearing officer, will close the hearing to review and deliberate on the presented information and render a decision on responsibility.
        9. The chair of the hearing board or hearing officer will re-open the hearing and present their findings to the accused student.
        10. If the student is found to be responsible as charged, the hearing board or hearing officer may reconvene to gather information to guide and support sanction The board or hearing officer may question the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct as to any past record of misconduct.
        11. The chair of the hearing board or hearing officer will excuse the accused student and complaint and close the hearing for deliberations regarding sanction recommendations.
      12. The student conduct board chairperson or the hearing officer will provide the board's decisions on responsibility for the violation and recommendations for sanctions to the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct within 3 working days of the close of the hearing.
      13. The Assistant Dean, Student Conduct will provide the accused student with a final written decision within 3 college working days of receiving the hearing board or hearing officer's decision and recommendations. The Assistant Dean, Student Conduct will apprise student complainant's of sexual assault or other serious physical assault of the outcome of the hearing. The Office of Student Conduct will be responsible for monitoring the student's adherence in carrying out any/all remedies or sanctions imposed as the resolution of the conduct process.
      14. The formal rules of evidence shall not apply in Student Code of Conduct proceedings.
      15. The hearing, except for deliberations, shall be tape or digitally recorded. Upon request by the student, a written transcript will be provided at the student's expense. Personally identifiable information will be removed from the transcript. The record shall be the property of the University of Nevada, Reno, and will be maintained with the student's confidential conduct records within the Office of Student Conduct.
      16. If an accused student, after receiving notice, does not appear at a student conduct hearing, the information in support of the complaint shall be presented, considered, and acted upon regardless of the accused student's absence. Failure of the student to appear is not evidence that the student was responsible for the charge of misconduct.
      17. All student conduct boards, hearing officers, or Student Conduct Administrators, may accommodate concerns for personal safety, well-being, and or fears of confrontation, by the complainant, the accused, and/or witnesses, during the hearing or during the informal resolution process by providing the opportunity for the hearing body or student conduct administrator to receive the pertinent information and conduct conversations for the resolution of the case using methods other than requiring both parties to be present in the same room at the same time. Such options include: video conferencing, phone conferencing, or other means, as determined by the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct or the Student Conduct Administrator overseeing the scheduling and coordinating the hearing.
  3. Appeals:
    1. A decision on responsibility for a violation of the Student Code of Conduct and/or an associated sanction for the violation may be appealed by the accused student(s), student organization or student complainants of sexual assault or other serious physical assault within five college working days of the decision. Such appeals shall be in writing and delivered to the Associate Dean of Students or his or her designee.
      Grounds for an appeal are:
      1. Deviations from procedures set forth which result in significant prejudice
      2. The decision reached regarding the accused student was not based on a preponderance of the evidence: that it was more likely than not that the accused student violated the Code
      3. The sanction(s) imposed were not appropriate for the violation of the Student Code of Conduct which the student or student organization was found to have committed
      4. New information, either not available at the time of the hearing which is sufficient to alter a decision or other relevant facts not in the original conduct resolution, are identified
    2. The Associate Dean of Students will review the appeal to determine if one of more of the grounds for an appeal has been met. If the Associate Dean finds that one or more of the stated grounds for an appeal have been met, he or she will then forward the appeal to the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct with the directive to impanel the Student Conduct Appeals Board. If the Associate Dean finds that none of the criteria for an appeal have been met, the matter is closed and the hearing board or hearing officer's decision is final.
    3. Student Conduct Appeals Board:
      The Student Conduct Appeals Board is comprised of representatives from the Student Conduct Board not involved in the original hearing.
    4. The Student Conduct Appeals Board shall review the statement of appeal, the original complaint of misconduct, recording of the hearing, decision and sanctioning recommendation, along with any other information and evidence that was part of the decision-making in the resolution of the conduct case, and will decide whether or not the appeal should be upheld.
      The Student Conduct Appeals Board may uphold the decision, may refer the case back or may hear the case as a new hearing board following student conduct hearing procedures described in section 5.
      If the appeal board re-hears the case, the decision is final. If the original board or officer rehears the case, that decision is also final.
  4. Possible Sanctions:

    Disciplinary sanctions are those actions imposed through informal resolution by a student conduct administrator or through formal resolution by a student conduct hearing officer or a student conduct board as a consequence of violations of the Student Code of Conduct.

    The purpose of a sanction is to educate an individual student on the impact of conduct violations on others in the university community, the importance of taking responsibility for resolving any concerns arising from the misconduct, and the needs of the community for resolution of the misconduct.

    Educational activities may be assigned to the student as a condition of his or her successful resolution of the violation(s). The educational purpose of sanctioning will ordinarily be the guiding force behind imposition of sanctions within the university disciplinary process.

    In some instances, however, the community's need to properly function outweighs the university's ability to educate an individual. In such a case, for the benefit of both the student and the community, suspension or expulsion from the university may result.

    1. One or more of the following disciplinary sanctions may be imposed on a student found to have violated the Student Code of Conduct:
      1. Warning:
      2. Reprimand:
      3. Restitution:
      4. Probation:
      5. Loss of Privileges:
      6. Discretionary and Educational Sanctions:
      7. Hold on transcript and/or registration:
      8. No contact order:
      9. University Suspension:
      10. Deferred University Suspension:
      11. University Expulsion:
      12. Withholding of a Degree

    Please note: Students found responsible for an academic dishonesty violation may be subject to additional academic sanctions as stated within the Academic Standards Policy; and student organizations may be subject to sanctions as stated in the section on Student Organizations as set forth in Section E below:

    1. More than one of the sanctions listed above may be imposed for any single violation
    2. Other than university expulsion, revocation, or withholding of a degree, disciplinary sanctions shall not be made part of the student's permanent transcript, but shall become part of the student's disciplinary record. The Family Education and Right to Privacy Act (FERPA) defines disciplinary records as education records. Disciplinary records are therefore protected from disclosure without written consent of the student or court order or as otherwise allowed by FERPA. Disciplinary records are stored within the Office of Student Conduct and maintained in compliance with FERPA and the Clery Act. Upon completion of the mandated time lines a student's disciplinary records are destroyed.
    3. Upon graduation, the student's disciplinary record may be expunged of disciplinary actions other than residence hall expulsion, university suspension, university expulsion, revocation or withholding of a degree, upon application to the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct and approval by the president.
  5. Student Organizations:

    Student organizations, either recognized through ASUN, the Graduate Student Association, or university departments, are required at all times to conduct themselves in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct. A student organization believed to be involved in any of the activities identified in these regulations or policies as misconduct may be reported to the Office of Student Conduct for an investigation of the activity in question.

    Procedure for Student Organizations
    The procedure for addressing a complaint filed through the Office of Student Conduct against a student organization is as follows:

    1. The complaint is directed to the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct
    2. A Student Conduct Administrator investigates the complaint
    3. After the investigation of the complaint, the Student Conduct Administrator will determine whether the information supports the allegation of misconduct, and if so, may proceed with information resolution including the imposition of any of the sanction listed below.
    4. The student organization may accept the decision or may request a hearing in front of a Student Conduct Hearing Board or Hearing OFficer.
    5. The hearing board will meet and determine if there has been a violation.
    6. The procedures set forth in Section B-5 shall also apply to hearing on allegations against an organization.

    Sanctions for student organizations include all those stated under “Sanctions” in addition to:

    Probation for up to one academic year;
    Prohibition from recruiting and/or accepting new members.
    Prohibition from participating in university events, including but not limited to orientation, intramurals, and other campus activities.
    Denial of use of university facilities.
    Loss of recognition of the organization.

  6. Emergency Removal:
    In certain circumstances, the president, or a designee, may impose a university suspension or organization loss of recognition prior to the resolution of a charge of student or student organization misconduct. This emergency removal includes the immediate removal from campus of a student or student organization for an interim period whenever the president determines that this is required to:
    1. Ensure the safety and well-being of members of the university community,
    2. Protect university property, or
    3. If the student poses an ongoing threat or disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations of the university.

    The student or student organization shall be denied access to the campus, including classes and/or to all other university activities or privileges for which the student or student organization might otherwise be eligible, as the president or his/her designee may determine to be appropriate. During the time of the removal from campus, the student or student organization may not come onto university property for any reason other than meeting with the appropriate university official(s) regarding resolution of the emergency removal and the student conduct resolution.

    Any student or student organization so removed shall be afforded an opportunity to a hearing on the emergency removal no later than 10 college working days following the removal unless the student or student organization agrees to delay the hearing to a later time. A student conduct hearing officer shall hold the hearing under the hearing procedures of the Student Code of Conduct. The president's decision upon the hearing officer's recommendation shall be final.

    The emergency removal does not replace the regular disciplinary process, which shall proceed on the normal schedule, up to and through a student conduct hearing, if required.

    In circumstances where the student is removed for his or her own emotional and personal safety, a resolution on the decision regarding the student's removal from campus will be addressed within an informal meeting with the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct, with the goal of the meeting being the development of a plan for most effectively meeting the student's personal and scholarly needs as a continuing student.

  7. Interpretation and Revision:

    Any question of interpretation or application of the Student Code of Conduct shall be referred to the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct or his or her designee for final interpretation.

    The Student Code of Conduct shall be reviewed and updated each year under the direction of the Assistant Dean, Student Conduct.


Employee and Faculty Disciplinary Sanctions

The following sanctions are applicable to faculty and staff of the University of Nevada, Reno for prohibited conduct. Depending on the seriousness of the misconduct, these sanctions may be imposed in any order.

List of Disciplinary Sanctions by Employee Type
FacultyClassified Staff
  • Warning
  • Reprimand
  • Restitution
  • Reduction in Pay
  • Suspension
  • Termination
  • Revocation of Degree
  • Verbal Warning
  • Written Reprimand
  • Supspension Without Pay
  • Demotion
  • Dismissal

Statement Addressing Sex Offender Registration

Section 1601 of Public Law 106-386, also known as the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, requires all sex offenders who are employees of, students of, or visitors to the University of Nevada Reno, to register with University Police Services. This includes employees of private contractors or other public entities who work at the university.

In addition to the federal laws requiring offender registration, the Nevada Revised Statutes also require offenders to register in any jurisdiction in which they will have a presence.

Offenders are assigned Level Numbers based on the details of the crime for which they are charged. Levels are set by the federal government and guidelines are given to the state Attorney General’s Office. Nevada Statutes are: 179D.730 explaining the levels of notification for sex offenders, and 179D.720 explaining the criteria for assessment.

Information on sex offenders who are students, employees or guests of the university may be obtained by contacting University Police Services at the number listed below. Other Sex Offender information is available on the police website at http:www.unr.edu/police/data-center/clery-legal-info or the Nevada Department of Public Safety through a link to the Nevada State Sex Offender Registry: http://www.nvsexoffenders.gov/.

Anyone needing to register, must register with University Police Services in the Fitzgerald Student Services Building. Please call (775) 784-4013 Mon-Fri 8:00 am to 5:00 pm (excluding holidays when the office is closed.


Annual Fire Safety Report

Residence Hall Fire Safety

List of Residence Hall Fire Safety Information
Peavine Hall 38 W. 11th St. Reno, NV 89503Nye Hall 55 Artemesia Way Reno, NV 89503Canada Hall 1255 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89503Juniper Hall 1014 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89503Sierra Hall 1001 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89503I - Argenta Hall 1201 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89503II - Argenta Hall 1201 N. Virginia St. Reno, NV 89503NV Living Learning Community 1295 N. Virginia St. Reno, NVPonderosa Village 1775 Evans Ave Reno, NV 89512
Audible/ Visual Fire Alarm/Panel
Sprinkler System
Smoke/Heat Detectors
Posted Evacuation Routes *
# of Evacuation (Fire) Drills Each Calendar Year 2 3 2 2 2 3 3 2 **

*Each unit exits directly outdoors so evacuation routes are not necessary.
**Each unit is separate and has its own dedicated alarm system, so evacuation drills are not necessary
*** Manzanita, and Lincoln halls, are no longer used as residential facilities and White Pine hall has been demolished.

  • All fire alarm detection systems have been upgraded and/or replaced with state of the art systems.
  • Each residence hall is inspected annually by the city fire department in addition to regular inspections by area fire stations.
  • Scheduled testing of fire equipment by private vendors and university personnel is conducted regularly.
  • State-of-the-art smoke and heat detection systems, in conjunction with exit doors, exit lighting and emergency lighting, provide early detection and warning to enable quick evacuation.
  • All halls are equipped with sprinkler systems.
  • The university has strict disciplinary and oversight systems in place to address prank-related alarms.
  • The university provides a computerized perimeter access security system to monitor all exterior doors in the residence halls.
  • Front desk in the residence halls are staffed nearly 24 hours each day.

The university, as a state entity, is under the jurisdiction of the state public works board and the state fire marshal. The state fire marshal’s office has stated that the residence halls are in compliance with state fire codes and that “the students are as safe in the residence halls as they are at home, if not safer.”

Applicable policies and procedures in the Residence Hall Handbook are listed below and available at: https://www.unr.edu/housing/tool-kit/student-handbook

Fire Alarm Procedures

Before an emergency happens, take the time to familiarize yourself with the fire exits in each hallway. If an alarm sounds and remains on, assume there is an emergency and evacuate the building immediately. Failure to evacuate the building during an alarm will result in disciplinary action and possible criminal charges.

Remember:

  • Feel the door for temperature - if it’s hot, don’t open it
  • Close the windows
  • If you can’t leave your room, stay calm
  • Call 911 to notify authorities of your location
  • Stuff wet sheets or clothing in cracks under doors
  • Hang a sheet out the window or shout for help to attract attention
  • If you leave the room, take your keys, close and lock the door behind you
  • Stay low to the ground if smoke is present
  • Move quickly but don’t run
  • Take a towel to avoid smoke inhalation
  • Wear coat and shoes
  • Don’t use elevators – use fire exits and stairs
  • Go to your hall’s specified evacuation location. Don’t leave the area/campus without reporting your status to staff.
  • Don’t re-enter the building until permitted to so do by emergency response personnel or residence hall staff.

Evacuation procedures

  • Exit via the stairway. Do not use elevators.
  • Wear shoes and beware of falling debris, broken glass, or electrical wires as you exit.
  • Go to an open area away from building, overhangs, trees, power lines, and roadways.
  • Stay outside and wait for instructions from emergency perssonel.
  • Do not leave the area/campus without reporting your status to staff.
Do not block the fire exit
Caution do not enter

Fire Drills

To ensure residents are prepared to react properly in an actual fire, fire drills may be conducted periodically. A total of 20 fire drills were conducted for on-campus student housing facilities during calendar year 2015. You must respond to any alarm as an actual emergency. In the event of an alarm you are required to evacuate the building immediately. Failure to do so will result in disciplinary action.

Fire Safety

Tampering with or disabling any part of the fire alarm system, altering door closing or latching hardware, discharging an extinguisher, activating or causing a false fire alarm, or setting a fire can endanger life and property, and may result in cancellation of your housing license agreement, restitution, disciplinary action, and/or criminal prosecution. Items may not be attached to or hung from any smoke detector or any part of the sprinkler system. Failure to report damage to fire or life safety equipment may also be considered a violation.

Fire Safety - Smoke and Heat Detectors

Smoke and heat detectors, installed in each room, must be kept in working order. It is essential to report any malfunction of these items to the front desk immediately. Damage to any safety equipment or intentional activation of fire alarms may also result in departmental sanctions, criminal charges, and payment of restitution or applicable fines and charges.

Failure to Comply

For the development of responsible and respectful communities, cooperation from residents is a must. Individuals may, at times, question policies or the means of implementation. If so, they should voice dissent through proper channels such as making an appointment with your RE/GRD or other administrative staff. Failure to comply with regulations or encouraging others to violate policies can lead to chaos. Providing false information may also cause unnecessary disruption and fails to meet the standard of honest we expect. The following actions will result in disciplinary action:
Failure to evacuate the building during an activated fire alarm and remaining in the building during an alarm places not only the individual at risk, but will result in disciplinary action.

University Fire Alarm
Fire Extinguisher

Prohibited Items

Many items are not permitted in the halls. Such items may be confiscated and held until they can be removed from the hall permanently. Items prohibited include, but may not be limited to:

  1. Flammable liquids, harmful chemicals, photo chemicals, barbecue grills, charcoal, gasoline, explosives, flares, firecrackers, fireworks, and any other items that may be determined to be hazardous. Possession of such materials may result in the cancellation of your license agreement as well as additional disciplinary action.
  2. Candles, incense, potpourri or any open flame burning.
  3. Space heaters, power tools, air conditioners, personal lamps that use bulbs over 150 watts, halogen lamps without wire or glass guards over the bulb, multi-plug extension cords and multi-plug adapters are not allowed. Surge-suppressors and multi-outlet cords with circuit breakers, however, are permitted. Housing is not responsible for damage to items due to power surges.
  4. Cooking equipment, hot-plates, toasters, electric fry-pans, grilling devices, or anything with an exposed heating element (except in Canada Hall kitchen areas). Authorized items include: hot-air popcorn poppers, blenders, coffee makers; one refrigerator per room (size of 4 cubic feet or less), one microwave per room (600 watt maximum).
  5. No "real" Christmas trees or wreaths. String of lights around the edges of the window are okay if you unplug them when leaving your room.
  6. Motorcycles, mopeds and automotive parts or components may not be kept in or around the buildings, except in designated parking areas. Bicycles may not be kept in hallways, stairwells, balconies, or public areas, except in designated racks.
  7. Nothing may be attached to furniture, the building, exterior poles, railings, trees, etc., or placed in hallways, window sills/ledges, or balconies.

University Fire Hazards: Candles, Hot plates, and trees.

Prohibited Activities

The following activities create a risk of damage, injury or other intrusion on the rights of others and will result in disciplinary action:

  1. Throwing or discharging anything from or toward the building, or inside the building, including water balloons, bottles, cigarette butts, litter, food, balls, rocks, spit, etc.
  2. Overloading electrical outlets and/or altering existing power or communication infrastructure. Residents will be held responsible for damages caused by these actions. Residents are also responsible to provide surge protection devices for any sensitive electronic equipment they use in the facilities.
  3. Attaching any items to the door of your room or hallway area. Small memo board may be attached beside the door, on the wall, using masking tape. Experience has shown that items attached to doors cause significantly more wear and tear than do memo pads attached to the wall next to the door.
  4. Attaching any items to the ceiling, water pipes, sprinklers, smoke detectors or other items on or near the ceiling in your room.
  5. Removing or tampering with window screens or blocks. Charges as high as $300 - $400 may be assessed. Many of the screens are custom made and not easily replaced. Secured screens may serve a security function and there are no valid reasons to remove one except in case of fire or other emergency.
  6. Cooking using a flame or open element, barbecuing or grilling food inside building or in unauthorized exterior areas is prohibited.
  7. Balconies are essentially external hallways. Balconies and hallways are walkways and must be kept clear of all objects at all times including attaching signs or objects.
  8. Smoking is not allowed in any of the residence halls, including residence hall rooms, public areas, hallways, balconies, lounges, laundry rooms, lobbies, immediate outside areas, etc.

University fire hazards

Fire Safety and Education

Fire safety training is conducted four times per year with all the resident assistants (RAs) that live in the residence halls. Training is conducted by the Assistant Director of Residential Life, Student Conduce and Safety. During residence hall orientation, the RAs discuss fire evacuation procedures with students and conduct a walk-through to show residents the safe exits out of each building. Fire drills are conducted with other emergency personnel.

Fire Log

A fire log is maintained by the University Police Services Records Section in accordance with the Clery Act. The fire log is available to be viewed by the public at the University Police Services office in the Fitzgerald Student Services Building Monday – Friday 8:00 am to 5:00 pm (excluding holidays on which university offices are close). Please contact our office if you have an immediate need to view the log.

Contact Information

In case of an actual fire please dial 9-1-1. In addition, a notification should be made to The Assistant Director, Student Conduct & Safety, Department of Residential Life, Housing and Food Services at (775) 784-1113.


Clery Fire Statistics 2014-2016

The following statistics must be collected and reported, for each on-campus student housing facility. (For the purposes of fire safety reporting, a fire is, “Any instance of open flame or other burning in a place not intended to contain the burning or in an uncontrolled manner.”)

List of Unintentional Fires by Year
Unintentional Fire201420152016
Cooking 0 0 0
Smoking Materials 0 0 0
Open Flames 0 0 0
Electrical 0 0 0
Heating Equipment 0 0 0
Hazardous Products 0 0 0
Machinery/Industrial 0 0 0
Natural 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0
List of Intentional Fires by Year
Intentional Fire201420152016
Number of deaths related to fire 0 0 0
Number of injuries related to the fire that resulted in treatment at a medical facility 0 0 0
Value of property damage related to the fire 0 0 0
List of Undetermined Fires by Year
Undetermined Fire201420152016
Number of deaths related to fire 0 0 0
Number of injuries related to the fire that resulted in treatment at a medical facility 0 0 0
Value of property damage related to the fire 0 0 0

Crime Statistics

Campus Crime Statistics 2014, 2015, 2016

Reported in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998

Campus: UNR Main Campus

List of Crime Statistics by Category and Year for UNR Main Campus
Crime CategoryOn-campusNon-campus buildingsPublic PropertyDorm / ResidentialTotal Crimes
201420152016201420152016201420152016201420152016201420152016
Criminal Offenses
Murder/ Non-negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manslaughter by negligience 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rape 4 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 5 2 2
Fondling 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1
Statutory rape 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Incest 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Aggravated Assault 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0
Burglary 3 7 13 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 10 14
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 4 3 1 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 4
Arson 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0
Arrests
Illegal weapons possession 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3
Drug law violations 20 20 32 0 3 10 5 24 25 17 12 13 25 47 67
Liquor law violations 162 102 98 2 2 2 25 70 25 81 55 43 189 174 125
Disciplinary Actions
Illegal weapons possession 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 0
Drug law violations 34 33 46 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 31 44 34 33 46
Liquor law violations 318 114 131 2 1 0 0 0 0 291 107 128 320 115 131
Sexual Violence
Domestic Violence 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3
Dating Violence 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 2 0
Stalking 4 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 1

Data are reported by calendar year.
*On-campus includes Dorm/Residential numbers
There were two unfounded crimes in 2014, no unfounded crimes in 2015, and three unfounded crimes in 2016.
There were no hate crimes in 2014, 2015 or 2016.

Campus Crime Statistics 2014, 2015, 2016

Reported in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998

nameCampus: UNR / Redfield

List of Crime Statistics by Category and Year for UNR / Redfield
Crime CategoryOn-campusNon-campus buildingsPublic PropertyTotal Crimes
201420152016201420152016201420152016201420152016
Criminal Offenses
Murder/ Non-negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manslaughter by negligience 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rape 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fondling 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory rape 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Incest 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Arrests
Illegal weapons possession 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Drug law violations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Liquor law violations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disciplinary Actions
Illegal weapons possession 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Drug law violations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Liquor law violations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sexual Violence
Domestic Violence 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Dating Violence 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Stalking 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Data are reported by calendar year.
There were no unfounded crimes in 2014, 2015 or 2016.
There were no hate crimes in 2014, 2015 or 2016.

Campus Crime Statistics 2014, 2015, 2016

Reported in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of 1998

Campus: UNR School of Medicine

List of Crime Statistics by Category and Year for UNR School of Medicine
Crime CategoryOn-campusNon-campus buildingsPublic PropertyTotal Crimes
201420152016201420152016201420152016201420152016
Criminal Offenses
Murder/ Non-negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manslaughter by negligence 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rape 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fondling 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory rape 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Incest 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Arrests
Illegal weapons possession 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Drug law violations 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Liquor law violations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disciplinary Actions
Illegal weapons possession 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Drug law violations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Liquor law violations 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sexual Violence
Domestic Violence 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Dating Violence 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Stalking 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Data are reported by calendar year.
There were no unfounded crimes in 2014, 2015 or 2016.
There were no hate crimes in 2014, 2015 or 2016.

The University of Nevada, Reno 2017 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report was prepared by:
Ashleigh Angell

University Police Services

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