Yanyao Jiang

Yanyao Jiang

Yanyao Jiang

Professor and ASME Fellow
Biography

Yanyao Jiang is professor and director of Mechanical Behavior Laboratory in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Nevada, Reno. He received his B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering at the Northeast University in China in 1983, M.S. degree in Solid Mechanics from the Zhejiang University in 1996, and Ph.D. degree in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1993.

Professor Jiang has made contributions in cyclic plasticity, fatigue and fracture, rolling contact, and durability of bolted joints. His research work has led to an understanding of the relationship between cyclic plasticity and fatigue failure. He developed plasticity models that have been widely used in research and have been implemented into the finite element code and the fatigue life prediction software packages for engineering applications.

Professor Jiang has done pioneering research on the inhomogeneous cyclic plastic deformation and ratcheting deformation. His approach for crack growth predictions bridges the crack initiation stage and the crack growth stage in fatigue research. He explored the fundamental mechanisms of self-loosening of bolted joints.

Professor Jiang's research has been supported by government agencies and industry including NSF, DoD, DoE, Boeing, and Ford Motor Company.

Professor Jiang was an associate editor of the ASME Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology and is currently a member of the Editorial Board for the International Journal of Plasticity and the International Journal of Fatigue.

Education
  • Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 1993
  • M.S., Zhejiang University, China, 1986
  • B.S., Northeastern University, China, 1983

Research interests

  • Cyclic plasticity, elastic-plastic finite element analysis
  • Fatigue and fracture of materials and structures
  • Inelastic constitutive relations
  • Rolling contact analysis
  • Thermo-mechanical behavior, durability of bolted joints