English course descriptions

Lingustics

English linguistics courses offered in the fall
Course Number Course Name Description Days Offered Time Offered Professor
281.1001 Introduction to Language MWF 11-11:50 Stookey
281.1002 Introduction to Language MWF 10-10:50 Stookey
281.1003 Introduction to Language TR 12-1:15 Valentine
281.1004 Introduction to Language TR 9-10:15 White
412A.1001 Linguistics TR 9-10:15 Valentine
412A.1002 Linguistics This course is an introduction to linguistics, which is the scientific study of language. We will focus on building a foundation in the core areas of linguistics, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. TR 1:30-2:45 Montoya
413D.1001 Introduction to Experimental Phonetics This course introduces the study of phonetics from both an experimental and a social perspective. Students will learn about the physiology of human speech production (how sounds are articulated, and the relationship between articulation and acoustics). MW 2:30-3:45 Clayton

Literature

English literature courses offered in the fall
Course Number Course Name Description Days Offered Time Offered Professor
271.1001 Introduction to Shakespeare TR 10:30-11:45 Stookey
311.1001 Transatlantic Survey I This course is a survey of English and (very) early American literature from 700-1800, covering literature from the Old and Middle English periods up through the 18th century. TR 12-1:15 Cronan
345.1001 Literature of Ethnic Minorities in the U.S. (Capstone and Diversity course) MW 1-2:15 Cosimini
345.1002 Literature of Ethnic Minorities in the U.S. (Capstone and Diversity course) MW 2:30-3:45 Cosimini
415A.1001 Old English This course is an introduction to the oldest stage of our language, known as Old English (from c. 600 to 1150), along with aspects of the history and culture of the Anglo-Saxons. TR 9-10:15 Cronan
425B.1001 Topics in Literature With the help of a series of literary, cinematic and theoretical texts, this course will approach deceptively simple questions about aesthetic form. TR 1:30-2:45 Dabashi
427A.1001 Women and Literature (Capstone course) TR 1:30-2:45
428A.1001 Children's Literature MW 2:30-3:45 Francis
433A.1001 Shakespeare: History and Tragedy TR 9-10:15 Rasmussen
445A.1001 The Victorian Period This course seeks to make the literature, culture and ethical concerns of 19th-century Britain accessible to 21st-century readers. We will read poetry, fiction and non-fiction prose while documenting the different movements and counter-movements. 12-1:15 Hill
454A.1001 Contemporary American Literature This class will consider post-1980 U.S. fiction and poetry that addresses issues central to contemporary culture, with an emphasis on representations by diverse Americans. TR 9-10:15 Keniston
462D.1001 American Poetry 1865-1945 We'll read and discuss primary voices in American poetry, with special attention paid to what it is that the past can teach us. We will also reference contemporary poetry that reflect concerns of the past. TR 4:30-5:45 Pahmeier
480B.1001 Topics in Comparative Literature In this course, we will ask: what can literary and filmic representation tell us about the new and shifting forms of human life that arise in the fluctuating cityscapes of the contemporary world? MW 2:30-3:45 Anam
488.1001 Ethics and Literature TR 10:30-11:45 Francis
499B.1001 Senior Research Project in Literature This course will teach students how to perform original research on a topic of literary and/or cultural merit and compose a multi-component research paper of article length. TR 3-4:15 Gifford

Cinema & Film

English cinema courses offered in the fall
Course Number Course Name Description Days Offered Time Offered Professor
202.1001 Film Analysis and Interpretation Students will be introduced to the language and concepts used to talk about film, such as aspects of narrative form, genre, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound design, and acting. TR 10:30-11:45 Stack

Writing

English writing courses offered in the fall
Course Number Course Name Description Days Offered Time Offered Professor
205.1001 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction and Poetry MWF 11-11:45
205.1002 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction and Poetry TR 12-1:15
298.1001 Writing About Literature Students are introduced to reading and writing about short fiction, poetry and drama. We'll look at characteristics of each of these genres, learn literary terminology, and discuss, draft, write, and revise essays. MW 2:30-3:45 Fenimore
298.1002 Writing About Literature TR 9-10:15 Cosimini
298.1003 Writing About Literature TR 12-1:15 Cosimini
305.1001 Fundamentals of Creative Writing: Fiction I/II This course will focus primarily on the workshopping of student-produced works of fiction, with an emphasis placed on establishing students' familiarity with the basic terms and concepts of fictional craft. MW 1-2:15 Coake
306.1001 Fundamentals of Creative Writing: Fiction I/II This course will focus primarily on the workshopping of student-produced works of fiction, with an emphasis placed on establishing students' familiarity with the basic terms and concepts of fictional craft. MW 1-2:15 Coake
307.1001 Fundamentals of Creative Writing: Poetry I/II This is an advanced course in poetry writing. The class will focus on workshopping student writing and will give students ample opportunity to compose and revise poems, as well as receive comprehensive feedback. TR 12-1:15 Stanley
308.1001 Fundamentals of Creative Writing: Poetry I/II This is an advanced course in poetry writing. The class will focus on workshopping student writing and will give students ample opportunity to compose and revise poems, as well as receive comprehensive feedback. TR 12-1:15 Stanley
321.1001 Expository Writing MWF 10-10:50 Watson, B.
400A.1002 Topics in Writing We talk about the ways writing constructs ecologies and how ecologies inform writing. This class examines how the scientific method inscribes ecosystems, how community discourses frame environmental issues, and how narratives structure environmental policies. TR 1:30-2:45 Ludden
400A.1003 Topics in Writing We discuss the essence of good storytelling, how and why narratives matter, read contemporary literary artists who excel in their craft and we'll write our own narratives. TR 3-4:15 Pahmeier
401B.1001 Advanced Nonfiction Writing This workshop is an exercise in honing individual style in non-fiction prose. By reading stylistics theory, doing grammar work and conducting style analysis, students will find their writing voices and expand style repertoires. TR 10:30-11:45 Walsh
401B.1002 Advanced Nonfiction Writing This team-based, project-based course will continue to use nonfiction writing to respond to Reno's affordable housing/homelessness issues via communication design thinking. Students will deploy a variety of nonfiction genres for a variety of purposes. TR 12-1:15 Macauley
403A/403B.1001 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction I/II This course is an advanced exploration of fiction writing. Students will write at least two new pieces of fiction (short stories or excerpts from longer works) and submit these to the class to be critiqued. MW 2:30-2:45 Hulse
404A/404B.1001 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry I/II This is an advanced course in poetry writing. The class will focus on workshopping student writing and give students ample opportunity to compose and revise poems, as well as receive comprehensive feedback. TR 12-1:15 Stanley
407B.1001 Technical Writing This course introduces principles of professional and technical writing and offers practical experience in document design and in the research and development of technical communications. TR 10:30-11:45 Xochime
408B.1001 Tutoring Student Writers This class trains students to work with peers on academic writing projects and prepares students to work in the University's Writing Center. MW 1-2:15 Miller, E.