College of Science assessment plans

Biology

  • Biology (B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    One of the major missions of the Department of Biology at the University of Nevada, Reno is to provide an outstanding and current undergraduate curriculum in basic biology. This curriculum emphasizes critical thinking and expression of thought, a basic understanding of science and its methods, and important technical skills, including analytical skills, related to the field of biology. Students are also equipped with basic and applied knowledge in general biology, and current knowledge in their field of expertise. Practical experience and exposure to ethical issues are also important to the overall curriculum. Graduates with a Bachelors Degree in Biology should be capable of succeeding in the workplace, professional school, or in graduate school upon graduation from our B.S. program.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Curriculum Content, formative: As they progress through Biology curriculum course sequence, the students will be able to successfully apply the knowledge they gained in each course to succeed in the following course in the recommended course sequence.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will successfully apply the knowledge of general biological principles they learned in introductory Biology courses (BIOL 190, 191, 192) when taking Genetics (BIOL 300)
    • Students will successfully apply their knowledge of basic genetic principles to upper-division courses, such as Molecular Biology.
    Assessment Method
    • Pre-test will be developed, and conducted in the beginning of each semester in BIOL 300. Additionally, students will be surveyed to assess their opinion about the value of current pre-requisites for Biology core courses.
    • A pre-test will be developed and conducted in the beginning of each semester in BIOL 315 (Cell Biology) to assess students' understanding of basic genetic principles.

    2. Methods of Science: Students will be able to identify, appreciate, and use the features of scientific method in research and distinguish it from other ways of knowing and learning.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will apply basic vocabulary terms specific to the process of science and use them appropriately in their written work.
    • Students will identify the main steps of scientific inquiry; correctly apply hypothetic-deductive reasoning and principle of falsifiability to biological systems studied during laboratory exercises (generate questions based on observations, develop testable hypotheses/predictions, design and conduct an experiment to test predictions, reject or accept hypotheses based on data evaluation); distinguish between observational and experimental tests when testing predictions to a hypothesis.
    • Students will formulate and correctly apply the main rules of experimental design; collect, analyze, and present data using appropriate techniques.
    Assessment Method
    • At least one question concerning the process of science will be included in the final exam of the main core Biology courses: BIOL 190, 191, 300, 315, 314, 316, 415. Students will demonstrate proficiency on the subject in each of these courses.
    • In laboratory courses (BIOL 192, 394, and 395) students will conduct laboratory experiments and semester-long projects where they will apply hypothetic-deductive reasoning and. Performance will be assessed via written lab reports and term papers.
    • In laboratory courses (BIOL 192, 394, and 395) students will be assessed on appropriate approach to experimental design, data collection and interpretation via evaluation of their laboratory reports, term papers, and oral presentations.

    3. Locate, Evaluate and Communicate Information: Students will be able to obtain relevant information, process and evaluate this information using critical thinking skills, and communicate their ideas to a wider audience using an appropriate format.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will be able to locate appropriate sources of primary and secondary literature using both the library and web-based searches.
    • Students will be able to use critical thinking skills to interpret information, make judgments about the gathered information, and show the ability to use inference to make logical conclusions about their work and/or the work of others.
    • Students will demonstrate via written assignments proficiency in interpreting and applying knowledge obtained during scientific literature search, and clearly communicates these findings using the concise style of scientific writing.
    Assessment Method
    • Students turn in copies of the references or include a literature-cited section as part of a term paper assignment in the introductory course (BIOL 192) and in their major's capstone course (BIOL 415). The course instructor and an outside evaluator will judge whether the
      1. student turned in the appropriate quality and
      2. references were used appropriately in citation.
    The instructor and evaluator will score a random sampling of these papers in each of these two categories using a scale of 1-5 ("fails to meet expectations" to "fully meets expectations") using a rubric.

    • Evaluations will be based on random sampling of student term papers in the introductory course (BIOL 192) and the major's capstone course (BIOL 415). In both courses the stated goals of the student papers (or parts of those papers) will be very similar, and a grading rubric is published to the students prior to the assignment. The rubric is designed to evaluate students in the area of critical thinking, which include, correct interpretation of information, evaluation and analysis of other's work, and inference skills. Students will be ranked from 1-5 ("failing to meet expectations" to "fully meets expectations")
    • Term papers in the BIOL 192, 394, 395 and 415 courses will require students to explain biological information obtained from the writings of others. The sources might be from the primary scientific literature or from other sources deemed appropriate by the instructor. A grading rubric will be designed and applied all of the courses to assess writing style and clarity. A random sampling of papers will be evaluated.

    4. Curriculum Content, summative: Senior Students will be able to show proficiency in content knowledge in the field of Biology that meet or exceed those of the national average for similar institutions. Students will also demonstrate competence in technical skills used in advanced laboratory courses and in the workplace.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will demonstrate factual and conceptual knowledge in general biology and in their areas of expertise. Students obtaining a Biology degree with an emphasis in ecology and evolutionary biology should have strengths in the areas of organismal biology, population biology, evolution and ecology. Students obtaining a Biology degree with an emphasis in cell and molecular biology should have a strong understanding of cell biology, molecular biology and genetics.
    • Students will demonstrate proficiency in basic technical and analytical skills used in both lower and upper-division laboratory courses, and in the workplace.
    Assessment Method
    • During their senior year, students will be required to take a 0-credit Senior Exit Seminar course survey/exam to access their level of knowledge in the major fields of Biology. As a part of this course, students will be given a survey using the ETS Major Field Test in Biology as has been done during 2003-2006. The ETS Major Field Test in Biology was chosen in past years in order to provide the department with a breakdown of each student's scores and an overall score for all students in various areas of Biology. These areas include: cell biology, molecular biology and genetics, organismal biology, and population biology, evolution and ecology. Scores are then compared to all schools that administer the test (>250 US schools) and to several equivalent institutions to determine how our students rank relative to students at other institutions. In addition to the Major Field Test, all graduating seniors will be required to complete a self-assessment survey which explores the skills they obtained while studying Biology at UNR, as well as evaluation of the Program.
    • Student skills will be accessed by giving a lab practical in General Biology Lab (Biology 192) to test their proficiency in technical and analytical skills, as well as in upper-division Laboratory classes (Biology 394 or 395) Examples include:
      • Use of a bright field microscopes, micropipettes, and Spec 20 spectrophotometers.
      • Calculating molarity and percent solutions using standard formulas; calculating mg/ml concentrations derived from an equation generated from a protein standard curve; carrying out t-test and chi-square calculations.
      • A description of how to make molar and % solutions.
      • A basic understanding of t-test and chi-square parameters, such as interpreting p-values and calculating degrees of freedom.
    Student success rate in these classes (% of students completing the above courses with a C or higher) will serve as a measure of this performance indicator.
  • Biology (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Biology offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science degree in biology. The mission of the Biology M.S. program is to prepare students with the advanced scientific knowledge and skills necessary to pursue careers as professionals in the biological sciences. The training includes rigorous classroom instruction at an advanced level, along with the mentored scholarly pursuit of new knowledge. Ultimately, the program intends to prepare creative scientists with a solid theoretical background, advanced training in current research techniques, and the communication skills needed to convey the results and societal significance of their work.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Biology Master's Degree students are expected to complete the program in a reasonable period of time and attend professional meetings. They are also encouraged to give presentations at professional meetings, prepare and submit papers for publication, prepare and submit grant proposals, and mentor undergraduates.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • The exit interview.

    Assessment Methods

    • Students will be asked to a complete a written 'exit interview', to be submitted along with a Curriculum Vitae to the Biology Assessment Committee, in which they evaluate their experience in the Biology Master's Degree program.
      The students will be asked to provide the following specific data:
      1. Time to graduation;
      2. Number of professional meetings attended;
      3. Number of presentations made at professional meetings;
      4. Number of publications submitted;
      5. Number of publications accepted or in press;
      6. Number of grant proposals submitted;
      7. Number of grants awarded;
      8. Did the student gained experience in mentoring undergraduates.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to conduct rigorous research that makes a significant contribution to scientific progress, and to produce a clear and coherent written presentation of their work.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • The Master's thesis.
    Assessment Methods
    • The advisory committee for each student evaluates the quality of the master's thesis with regard to the criteria listed in Student Learning Outcome 1. After successful completion of the thesis, each member of the committee will submit copies of a written evaluation of the thesis based on a standardized rubric to the primary advisor and the Biology Assessment committee.

    2. Students will be able to effectively communicate about their research in an oral, professional-style seminar.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • The exit seminar.
    Assessment Methods
    • Biology Master's Degree program present a public exit seminar on their research. As with the written thesis, committee members will use a standardized rubric to evaluate the quality of this presentation and submit copies to the primary advisor and the Biology Assessment committee.
  • Neuroscience (B.A. and B.S.) (with Psychology)

    Mission Statement

    The interdisciplinary Bachelor of Science degree in Neuroscience is offered jointly through the Departments of Psychology and Biology. The mission of the program is to provide students comprehensive training in the foundations of modern neuroscience from the cellular to systems level, as well as basic and applied knowledge in general science, psychology, and biology that will allow them to master and critically evaluate knowledge in the field. Directed learning experiences are also included to develop research skills. A major aim of the program is to equip students with the knowledge and skills that will prepare them to successfully pursue graduate studies in a variety of basic and applied disciplines with a neuroscience focus, from cognitive and biological sciences to biotechnology and medicine.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Students will be well prepared and competitive for graduate studies.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Honors students will complete and defend a thesis project
    • Students will present research as authors or coauthors at local or national conferences
    • Students will complete the GRE or MCAT for admission to graduate or medical school
    • Graduating students will complete exit interviews

    Assessment Method

    • Faculty will evaluate theses with regard to written and oral quality
    • The number of presentations will be monitored and student performance will be evaluated by the faculty supervisors
    • GRE and MCAT scores will be tracked through exit surveys
    • Surveys will be reviewed by the co-directors and curriculum committee

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate mastery of core concepts and principles in Neuroscience as well as developing expertise in sub-disciplines within the field.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will demonstrate their comprehension through assignments and presentations in the core upper division courses for the major(Neurobiology and Physiological Psychology), as well as in cluster options in upper division Biology and Psychology courses. Instructors of 400-level courses in the major will be surveyed to evaluate student comprehension.
    • Core courses for the major are Neurobiology (Bio 475) and Physiological Psychology (Psy 403). Performance of Neuroscience majors in these courses will be compared relative to the baseline of non-neuroscience majors completing the same courses.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty surveys will be reviewed by the co-directors and the curriculum committee
    • Performance will be evaluated by faculty teaching the core courses

    2. Students will be able to display effective written, oral, and quantitative skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will demonstrate their proficiency through assignments and presentations in the core upper division courses for the major(Neurobiology and Physiological Psychology), as well as in cluster options in upper division Biology and Psychology courses. Instructors of 400-level courses in the major will be surveyed to evaluate student proficiency.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty surveys will be reviewed by the co-directors and the curriculum committee

    3. Students will be able to demonstrate research and applied skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will participate in supervised research experience in a faculty lab. These directed learning experiences will involve close interaction with supervisors. Faculty surveys will be used to evaluate students' knowledge and competence in research methods.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty surveys will be reviewed by the co-directors and the curriculum committee.

Chemistry

  • Chemistry (B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    Chemistry is an experimental science. The predictive capability and therefore the utility of chemistry is based upon an enormous body of observations and deductions. The science of chemistry represents a comprehensive model for the nature and behavior of macroscopic chemical, physical, and biological systems that can be explained by microscopic atomic and molecular structure and interactions. Fundamental chemical concepts are formulated in pure mathematics and physics, but these concepts must survive tests of quantitative measurement. Application of chemical knowledge is frequently a province of high specialization, of technological sophistication, and of healthy scientific contention regarding new interpretations and observations. However, chemists involved in either applied chemistry or in research and development in all areas share an extensive core set of skills, standardized terminology, and a body of experimentally confirmed factual knowledge. The curriculum of the baccalaureate degree program of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Nevada provides students with both a broad liberal arts background and the specialized knowledge and skills in Chemistry needed to embark on a career as a chemist in the public or private sectors, to continue in graduate studies in chemistry, to pursue one of the medical professions, or to become an educator. Chemistry majors will graduate with a comprehensive set of knowledge and skills in the disciplines of chemistry, including organic, inorganic, physical, and analytical chemistry, and with basic knowledge and skills in physics and mathematics. A core set of chemistry courses provides fundamental knowledge and experimental training in the various disciplines. These are augmented by advanced courses suitable for preparation for graduate study or for specialization in environmental chemistry. The experimental nature of the science of chemistry is emphasized in laboratory experiences. Training in operational skills - how to do chemistry - is provided in laboratory courses at every level of instruction. Skills in scientific communication, chemical information retrieval, and modern computation are also incorporated at all stages. The opportunity for involvement in undergraduate research allows exposure to the frontiers of chemistry research and close interaction with a faculty member.

    The Professional Chemistry Emphasis is designed for students who are interested in a career as a chemist in industry or government, or in graduate school in chemistry or related areas. The Environmental Chemistry Emphasis is designed for those interested in a concentration on environmental chemistry, including advanced analytical methods and toxicology. These two Emphases have been approved by the American Chemical Society (ACS) as satisfying rigorous national standards. The Pre-medical Empasis is tailored specially for students who are planning to continue to medical school, dental school, or other medical professional schools. The General Emphasis is for students who are planning careers in the chemical industry, teaching, agriculture, environmental science, or health sciences. This emphasis offers more course flexibility than the other emphases, to accommodate tracks like double majors, and to enable the student to pursue special areas of interest.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Chemical knowledge

    • (a) Graduates will possess a broad spectrum of factual chemical knowledge concerning naming and chemical and physical properties of substances.
    • (b) Graduates will possess a thorough knowledge of basic principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, and the chemical and physical properties of substances.
    • (c) Graduates will possess a thorough knowledge of the subfields of chemistry, including analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry.
    • (d) Graduates will possess cognitive skills in areas such as mathematics and physics to facilitate the understanding and manipulation of fundamental chemical theories.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • ACS standardized exam in General Chemistry
    • ACS standardized exam in Organic Chemistry
    • ACS standardized exams in Physical Chemistry
    • ACS standardized exam in Inorganic Chemistry
    Assessment Method
    • Exam administered at the end of CHEM 202. Results compared to national norms.
    • Exam administered at the end of CHEM 348 (second semester organic chemistry laboratory). Results compared to national norms.
    • Exam administered in CHEM 421 and 422 (Physical Chemistry I & II). Results compared to national norms.
    • Exam administered in CHEM 431 (Inorganic Chemistry). Results compared to national norms.

    2. Quantitative reasoning skills

    • (a) Graduates will possess an understanding of and the ability to apply the scientific method (formulating hypotheses and arriving at logically supported answers and conclusions).
    • (b) Graduates will have a practical understanding of applied mathematics, including algebra, geometry, differential and integral calculus, and topics in differential equations, matrix theory, and probability theory.
    • (c) Graduates will possess the ability to competently solve problems including the concepts of extrapolation, approximation, precision, accuracy, rational estimation, and statistical validity.
    • (d) Graduates will possess the ability to evaluate and interpret chemical, numerical, and general scientific information.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Final exams in CHEM 201 & 202, 330, 341 & 342; 421 & 422, 431, 435; 442, 450.
    • Problem sets in advanced courses CHEM 341, 342, 421, 422, 431
    • Student tracking/performance data in CHEM 341, 342, 421, 422, 431.
    Assessment Method
    • Final exams from all instructors reviewed by the Assessment Committee on the five-year cycle for problem-solving and quantitative difficulty including various reasoning, problem-solving, and mathematical skill (rather than knowledge or content areas), as appropriate for the course level
    • A representative portfolio of problem sets for each course reviewed by the Assessment Committee on five-year cycle (as above).
    • Individual student learning outcomes assessed by faculty via a survey instrument and correlated with grades in prerequisite courses.

    3. Experimental skills

    • (a) Graduates will possess the ability to perform accurate quantitative measurements, interpret experimental results, perform calculations on these results and draw appropriate and accurate conclusions.
    • (b) Graduates will possess the ability to synthesize, separate, and characterize compounds using published methods, safe laboratory protocols, standard laboratory equipment, and modern instrumentation.
    • (c) Graduates will possess an understanding of the theory and use of modern chemical instrumentation.
    • (d) Graduates will be able to design and perform effective laboratory experiments, to gather and analyze data, and to test hypotheses.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Laboratory skills (CHEM 347, 348, 432, 435, 423, 444, 455)
    • Safety training completion (in lab courses and EH&S safety course for undergraduate research students)
    Assessment Method
    • A representative portfolio of laboratory reports in upper-level lab courses reviewed for learning outcomes by the Assessment Committee on a five-year-cycle
    • Certification of completion of safety training (on-line quiz instrument) required for each lab course and for Senior Thesis

    4. Communication and information skills

    • (a) Graduates will be proficient in the oral and written communication of their scientific work and ideas.
    • (b) Graduates will possess the ability to make effective use of information resources, including (i) finding chemical information utilizing the primary literature, both in a traditional library and in electronic indexes and journals, (ii) critically evaluating chemical information, (iii) finding and evaluating chemical information utilizing secondary sources such as electronic databases.
    • (c) Graduates will be proficient in the use of computers, modern computer software, and computer-based information systems, including (i) using a computer as a tool in technical writing, drawing chemical structures, and presenting data to effectively communicate scientific information, (ii) having a familiarity with the application of computational chemistry in the modeling and simulation of chemical phenomena, and (iii) having an appreciation of the applications of computers in data acquisition and processing.
    • (d) Graduates will have a thorough understanding and appreciation of scientific and academic ethics, including such issues as avoidance of plagiarism, responsibility for scientific accuracy, documentation of experimental results, and protection of intellectual property.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Unknowns laboratory report in CHEM 348.
    • CHEM 423 Physical Chemistry Laboratory long reports.
    • Senior Theses
    • Ethics quizzes in Freshman Year Experience course (SCI 110) and for Senior Thesis.
    Assessment Method
    • Scored using a rubric for written scientific reports.
    • Scored using a rubric for written scientific reports. Compared with previous rubric score in CHEM 348 for individual students.
    • Scored using a rubric for written scientific reports. Compared with previous rubric scores in CHEM 348 and 423 for individual students. Copies of all senior theses are filed by the department office.
    • Certification of completion of ethics training required (on-line quiz instrument).

    5. Professional and career success

    • (a) Graduates will be successful in their professional careers as demonstrated by their abilities to solve important chemistry problems, to solve problems in areas different from their training, and to develop new and valuable ideas.
    • (b) Graduates will be able to work in a variety of professional environments as demonstrated by the abilities to work both in teams and independently, to provide project leadership, to mentor junior co-workers, and to communicate scientific results effectively to the chemistry community and the public.
    • (c) Graduates will possess professional character as demonstrated by their ethical behavior, their pursuit of continuing education and involvement in professional associations, and their commitment to safety and protection of the environment.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Post-graduation employment or graduate school placement
    • Career employment and salary data
    • Job performance
    Assessment Method
    • Exit interview, compared with national trends.
    • Alumni survey. Data compared with annual ACS salary survey of all chemists, by employment type.
    • Employer Surveys.
  • Chemistry (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    Recognized as the "Central Science," Chemistry constitutes the scientific cornerstone for agriculture, manufacturing, medicine, mining, nanotechnology, and semiconductors, which are critical to the welfare of the citizens and economic development of the state, nation, and the world. The mission of the Chemistry M.S. program is to prepare students with advanced scientific knowledge and the training necessary to pursue careers as chemical professionals. This training includes rigorous classroom instruction at the advanced level along with the scholarly pursuit of new knowledge. The preparation and defense of an M.S. thesis containing original research is a primary achievement of students in the program. Ultimately, the program intends to prepare creative scientists with a solid theoretical background, advanced training in current research techniques, and the communication skills needed to convey the results and societal significance of their work. Graduates of the Chemistry M.S. program should be prepared for careers as professional chemists in industry, national laboratories, and education.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Theoretical knowledge

    • (a) Students will possess a broad factual knowledge at the advanced level in all subfields of chemistry (Physical, Inorganic, Organic, and Analytical).
    • (b) Students will possess a deep factual and theoretical understanding of their area of specialization, including an awareness of modern research methods and technology, and problems of intense current interest.
    • (c) Students will possess advanced cognitive skills in areas such as mathematics and physics that are necessary to understand and advance chemical theories.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Problem Sets, Exams, and Final Exams in graduate core courses (CHEM 631,642,650)
    • Student tracking/performance in graduate core courses
    • Cumulative exams
    • Problem sets, exams and final exams from advanced courses beyond the graduate core courses.
    Assessment Method
    • Materials collected annually from each course are reviewed for subject content, problem solving, and quantitative reasoning.
    • Analysis of how students perform (grades and scores) in each course relative to their performance on the registration exams.
    • Analysis of the examination level and student performance on exams.
    • Materials from each course are reviewed for level of difficulty, content breadth and depth, problem solving, and quantitative reasoning, on a rotating basis for the subdisciplines (Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry) by an evaluation committee primarily of faculty from that discipline.

    2. Research methods, planning, and experiment design

    • (a) Students will independently design experiments to investigate a scientific hypothesis.
    • (b) Students will carry out experiments safely, using proper equipment and techniques.
    • (c) Students will independently conduct data analysis, along with evaluation of experimental or computational uncertainties and noise. Students can interpret results in the context of their uncertainties.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Experiment design
    • Laboratory safety
    • Analytical skills
    Assessment Method
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.

    3. Literature research and communication skills

    • (a) Students will be able to present their work by effective written communication in the form of scientific papers and reports, and by oral communication in the form of scientific seminars.
    • (b) Students will be able to train others in basic scientific knowledge and techniques and in advanced knowledge and techniques in their field of expertise.
    • (c) Students will be able to use scientific databases and the scientific literature to research a new topic. Students will have the ability to critically analyze and extract information from papers in the scientific literature.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Written communication
    • Teaching and training skills
    • Oral communication
    Assessment Method
    • Theses and reports evaluated annually by research mentor with discussion of evaluation by department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting. Student performance evaluated in Seminar courses using scoring rubric for written abstracts.
    • Annual evaluation of teaching assistants by their students. Teaching and training skills in the research laboratory evaluated by research mentor with discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Student performance in group meetings and divisional colloquia evaluated by research mentor with discussion of evaluation by department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting. Student performance in Seminar courses using scoring rubric for oral presentations.

    4. Scientific creativity and independence

    • (a) Students will understand the societal and general scientific significance of their work.
    • (b) Students will possess the ability to identify key issues within their research area and independently propose new research directions and meaningful, testable hypotheses.
    • (c) Students will be able to draw from their general scientific training to synthesize new problem solving approaches.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Student self-direction and independence in research
    • Thesis defense
    Assessment Method
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Evaluation by examining committee.

    5. Professional and career success

    • (a) Graduates will be successful in their professional careers as demonstrated by their abilities to solve important chemistry problems, to solve problems in areas different from their training, and to develop new and valuable ideas.
    • (b) Graduates will be able to work in a variety of professional environments as demonstrated by the abilities to work both in teams and independently, to provide project leadership, to mentor junior co-workers, and to communicate scientific results effectively to the chemistry community and the public.
    • (c) Graduates will possess professional character as demonstrated by their ethical behavior, their pursuit of continuing education and involvement in professional associations, and their commitment to safety and protection of the environment.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Post-graduation employment or graduate school placement
    • Career employment and salary data
    • Job performance
    Assessment Method
    • Exit interview, compared with national trends
    • Alumni Survey. Data compared with annual ACS salary survey of all chemists, by employment type.
    • Alumni Employer Survey
  • Chemistry (Ph.D.)

    Mission Statement

    Recognized as the "Central Science," Chemistry constitutes the scientific cornerstone for agriculture, manufacturing, medicine, mining, nanotechnology, and semiconductors, which are critical to the welfare of the citizens and economic development of the state, nation, and the world.

    The mission of the Chemistry Ph. D. program is to prepare students with advanced scientific knowledge and the training necessary for research careers in the chemical sciences, addressing issues that are important to society today and in the future. This training includes rigorous classroom instruction at the advanced level along with the scholarly pursuit of new knowledge. The preparation and defense of a Ph. D. dissertation and publication of research results in peer reviewed scientific journals are the most visible achievements of students in the program.

    Ultimately, the program intends to prepare creative scientists with a solid theoretical background, advanced training in current research techniques, and the communication skills needed to convey the results and societal significance of their work. Graduates of the Chemistry Ph. D. program should be prepared for careers as independent scientists in industry, national laboratories, and academia.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Theoretical knowledge

    • (a) Students will possess a broad factual knowledge at the advanced level in all subfields of chemistry (Physical, Inorganic, Organic, and Analytical).
    • (b) Students will possess a deep factual and theoretical understanding of their area of specialization, including an awareness of modern research methods and technology, and problems of intense current interest.
    • (c) Students will possess advanced cognitive skills in areas such as mathematics and physics that are necessary to understand and advance chemical theories.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Problem sets, exams, and final exams in graduate core courses (CHEM 631, 642, 650)
    • Student tracking/performance in graduate core courses
    • Cumulative exams
    • Problem sets, exams, and final exams in advanced graduate courses beyond the graduate core curriculum.
    Assessment Method
    • Materials from each course are reviewed by assessment committee representing each subdiscipline (Inorganic, Organic, or Physical Chemistry) for problem solving and quantitative reasoning.
    • Analysis of how students perform (grades and scores) in each course relative to their performance on the registration exams.
    • Analysis of the examination level and student performance on exams, evaluated by each subdiscipline.
    • Materials from each course are reviewed for level of difficulty, content breadth and depth, problem solving, and quantitative reasoning, on a rotating basis for the subdisciplines (Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry) by an evaluation committee primarily of faculty from that discipline.

    2. Research methods, planning, and experiment design

    • (a) Students will independently design experiments to investigate a scientific hypothesis.
    • (b) Students will carry out experiments with safety, using proper safety equipment and techniques.
    • (c) Students will independently conduct data analysis, along with evaluation of experimental or computational uncertainties and noise. Students can interpret results in the context of their uncertainties.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Experiment design
    • Laboratory safety
    • Analytical skills
    Assessment Method
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.

    3. Literature research and communication skills

    • (a) Students will be able to present their work by effective written communication in the form of scientific papers and reports, and by oral communication in the form of scientific seminars.
    • (b) Students will be able to train others in basic scientific knowledge and techniques and in advanced knowledge and techniques in their field of expertise.
    • (c) Students will be able to use scientific databases and the scientific literature to research a new topic. Students will have the ability to critically analyze and extract information from papers in the scientific literature.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Written communication
    • Teaching and training skills
    • Oral communication
    Assessment Method
    • Dissertations, scientific papers, and reports evaluated annually by research mentor with discussion of evaluation by department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting. Student performance evaluated in Seminar courses using scoring rubric for written abstracts.
    • Annual evaluation of teaching assistants by their students. Teaching and training skills in the research laboratory evaluated by research mentor with discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Student performance in group meetings and divisional colloquia evaluated by research mentor with discussion of evaluation by department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting. Student performance in Seminar courses using scoring rubric for oral presentations.

    4. Scientific creativity and independence

    • (a) Students will understand the societal and general scientific significance of their work.
    • (b) Students will possess the ability to identify key issues within their research area and independently propose new research directions and meaningful, testable hypotheses.
    • (c) Students will be able to draw from their general scientific training to synthesize new problem solving approaches.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Student self-direction and independence in research
    • Oral Proposal Defense
    • Dissertation defense
    Assessment Method
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Evaluation by examining committee.
    • Evaluation by examining committee.

    5. Professional and Career Success

    • (a) Graduates will be successful in their professional careers as demonstrated by their abilities to solve important chemistry problems, to solve problems in areas different from their training, and to develop new and valuable ideas.
    • (b) Graduates will be able to work in a variety of professional environments as demonstrated by the abilities to work both in teams and independently, to provide project leadership, to mentor junior co-workers, and to communicate scientific results effectively to the chemistry community and the public.
    • (c) Graduates will possess professional character as demonstrated by their ethical behavior, their pursuit of continuing education and involvement in professional associations, and their commitment to safety and protection of the environment.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Post-graduation employment or graduate school placement.
    • Career employment and salary data
    • Job performance
    Assessment Method
    • Exit interview, compared with national trends.
    • Alumni Survey. Data compared with annual ACS salary survey of all chemists, by employment type.
    • Alumni Employer Survey
  • Chemical Physics (Ph.D.) (with Physics)

    Mission Statement

    Chemical Physics lies at the interface of Chemistry and Physics. The emergence of the field recognizes that the fundamental chemical behavior of molecular substances is governed by the laws of physics, while the physics of atoms and molecules reaches into the domain of chemical properties.

    The Chemical Physics Program intends to create an interdisciplinary community of scientists in which fundamental new knowledge is produced and applied to problems important to society today and in the future. Students in the Chemical Physics program are provided with the best possible opportunity to acquire the knowledge and training necessary to pursue their goals. This training includes rigorous classroom instruction at the advanced level along with the scholarly pursuit of new knowledge. The preparation and defense of a Ph.D. thesis and publication of research results in peer reviewed scientific journals are the most visible achievements of students in the program.

    Ultimately, the program intends to prepare creative scientists with a solid theoretical background, advanced training in current research techniques, and the communication skills needed to convey the results and societal significance of their work. Graduates of the Chemical Physics Program should be prepared for careers as independent scientists in industry, national laboratories, and academia.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Theoretical knowledge

    • (a) Students will possess a broad factual knowledge at the advanced level in all subfields of molecular physics and physical chemistry (including Quantum Mechanics, Statistical Mechanics, Mathematical Physics, Spectroscopy, and Chemical Reaction Dynamics).
    • (b) Students will possess a deep factual and theoretical understanding of their area of specialization, including an awareness of current modern research methods and technology, and problems of intense current interest.
    • (c) Students will possess familiarity with fundamental experimental or theoretical techniques that complement their advanced training in their immediate area of expertise.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Written comprehensive exam in Chemical Physics
    • Problem Sets, Exams, and Final Exams in graduate core courses in the five required areas (PHYS 701, 702, 721, 722, 730, 732; CHEM 752, 755, 757)
    • Student tracking/performance in graduate core courses
    Assessment Method
    • Analysis of the examination level and student performance on exams. Evaluation by the examination committee.
    • Materials collected from each course are reviewed by an assessment committee represented by both subdisciplines (Chemistry and Physics) for level of difficulty, content depth and breadth, problem solving, and quantitative reasoning.
    • Analysis of how students perform (grades and scores) in each course relative to their performance on the qualifying exams.

    2. Research methods, planning, and experiment design

    • (a) Students will independently design experiments to investigate a scientific hypothesis.
    • (b) Students will carry out experiments safely, using proper equipment and techniques.
    • (c) Students will independently conduct data analysis, along with evaluation of experimental or computational uncertainties and noise. Students can interpret results in the context of their uncertainties.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Experiment design
    • Laboratory safety
    • Analytical skills
    Assessment Method
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.

    3. Literature research and communication skills

    • (a) Students will be able to present their work by effective written communication in form of scientific papers and reports, and by oral communication in the form of scientific seminars.
    • (b) Students will be able to train others in basic scientific knowledge and techniques and in advanced knowledge and techniques in their field of expertise.
    • (c) Students will be able to use scientific databases and the scientific literature to research a new topic. Students will have the ability to critically analyze and extract information from papers in the scientific literature.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Oral communication
    • Written communication
    • Teaching and training skills
    Assessment Method
    • Student performance in group meetings and divisional colloquia evaluated by research mentor with discussion of evaluation by department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting. Student performance in Seminar courses using evaluated using scoring rubric.
    • Dissertation, scientific papers, and reports evaluated annually by research mentor with discussion of evaluation by department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting. Student performance evaluated in Seminar courses using scoring rubric for written abstracts.
    • Annual evaluation of teaching assistants by their students. Teaching and training skills in the research laboratory evaluated by research mentor with discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.

    4. Scientific creativity and independence

    • (a) Students will understand the societal and general scientific significance of their work.
    • (b) Students will possess the ability to identify key issues within their research area and independently propose new research directions and meaningful, testable hypotheses.
    • (c) Students will be able to draw from their general scientific training to synthesize new problem solving approaches.
    Student Performance Indicators
    • Dissertation defense
    • Career employment and salary data
    • Oral Comprehensive Exam
    • Student self-direction and independence in research
    • Job performance
    Assessment Method
    • Evaluation by examining committee.
    • Alumni survey, data compared with national ACS and APS salary surveys by employment type.
    • Evaluation by examining committee.
    • Annual evaluation by research mentor and discussion of evaluation with department faculty at end-of-year faculty meeting.
    • Alumni employer survey

Geography

  • Geography (B.A. and B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Geography is the only program in Nevada that grants baccalaureate and graduate degrees in Geography and Land Use Planning. The curriculum contributes to the higher education to all interested Nevadans with a full array of geographic offerings. Recognizing the varied needs and nature of Nevada students, the Department supports the University Core Curriculum, the degree at night program, non-degree enrollees, and instructs many non-majors, in addition to students seeking Geography majors and minors. While these students who are seeking "minors" in geography, or taking elective courses for their own majors are not necessarily considered a major force in assessment at the University level, there are a longstanding constituency of the department, and we will serve their interests and attempt to assess their well-being and progress within the assessment frame.

    Geography at Nevada emphasizes human-environment interactions. Our curriculum and research specialize in the study of desert and mountain landscapes and people in arid and mountainous environments. The Department emphasizes the integration of human and physical geography and encourages the use of geospatial technologies (GIS, Remote Sensing, and Cartography). Our approach encourages problem solving that utilizes spatial reasoning and the analysis of questions at multiple spatial scales: local, regional and global.

    Our department has a strong physical geography component that seeks to understand pattern and process within nature. We have strengths in cultural and historical geography that seek to understand pattern and process within societies. Where studies of nature and society meet, we study the effects of human ideas, systems and activities on the environment. And looking at human-environment interactions from a different perspective, our work also encompasses how the environment establishes contexts and constraints for human ideas, systems and activities. Both BA and BS degrees in Geography may be obtained.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Develop professional skills that will promote career development (writing; verbal presentation; visual communication; library and archival research; field work; computing; quantitative analysis; qualitative analysis; accountability, efficiency, precision and accuracy).

    Student Performance Indicators
    • 1a. Capable of writing a complete, well constructed essay or paper using correct vocabulary, grammar, spelling and punctuation.
      1b. Capable of making oral presentations to a group in a clear, understandable, professional manner.
      1c. Capable of analyzing and preparing graphics, posters and presentations that communicate ideas visually, through design, layout, color, symbols and graphic representation.
      1d. Capable of using appropriate search methods to find books, journal articles, maps, photographs, digital data and other research materials.
      1e. Capable of answering research questions through the collection and analysis of data collected in the field.
      1f. Capable of using computers for basic file management, printing, email, web search and use of basic software programs, including word processing, spreadsheets, and simple programming.
      1g. Capable of solving problems requiring statistical analysis, manipulation of numerical data and simple mathematical models.
      1h. Capable of interpreting information in the form of observations, text and dialogue.
      1i. Capable of punctuality, meeting deadlines, working efficiently alone and in groups, selecting appropriate methods for work and achieving accuracy in results.
    Assessment Method
    • Each of these performance indicators will be assessed through:
      a)administering a student self assessment of skill development for each geography course taken;
      b)administering a faculty assessment of skill development for each geography course taught;
      c) qualitative student evaluation of skill development throughout the curriculum as administered in a required major capstone course (GEOG 418);
      d) alumni survey evaluation of skills developed in the geography curriculum and the usefulness of these skills in their job and for career advancement.

    2. Attain proficiency in a range of analytical skills (memorizing, analyzing, synthesizing, judgment, applications).

    Student Performance Indicators
    • 2a. Proficient at memorizing facts, ideas or methods so they can be repeated in pretty much in the same form.
      2b. Proficient at analyzing the basic elements of an idea, experience or theory, such as a particular case or situation in depth and consider its components.
      2c. Proficient at synthesizing and organizing ideas, information or experiences into new, more complex interpretations and relationships.
      2d. Proficient at making judgments about the value of information, arguments or methods, such as examining how others have gathered and interpreted data and assessing the soundness of their conclusions.
      2e. Proficient at applying theories or concepts to practical problems or in new situations; these include ability with interactive graphics and demonstrated graphic literacy.
    Assessment Method
    • Each of these performance indicators will be assessed through:
      a) administering a student self assessment of skill development for each geography course taken;
      b) administering a faculty assessment of skill development for each geography course taught;
      c) qualitative student evaluation of skill development throughout their curriculum as administered in a required major capstone course (GEOG 418);
      d) alumni survey evaluation of skills developed in the geography curriculum and the usefulness of these skills in their job and for career advancement.

    3. Increase understanding of substantive disciplinary knowledge (spatial analysis, perception and geography; regional understandings; cultural interpretations of place and landscape; physical geographic analysis; human-environment interactions).

    Student Performance Indicators
    • 3a. Experienced in interpreting patterns of distribution and recognizing phenomena and processes as they occur in space.
      3b. Experienced in assessing relationships between the experiences and perceptions of individuals/groups and the transformation of places and landscapes.
      3c. Experienced in evaluating the organization of space into regions based upon understandings of physical and social environments.
      3d. Experienced in observing the influence of culture and society in the transformation of places and landscapes.
      3e. Experienced in recognizing environmental processes and their spatial patterns as they are associated with changes in landscapes, climatic change, water regimes and biotic interactions.
      3f. Experienced in examining dynamics between social actions and the interpretation, use, quality and change of physical environments.
    Assessment Method
    • Each of these performance indicators will be assessed through:
      a) administering a student self assessment of skill development for each geography course taken;
      b) administering a faculty assessment of skill development for each geography course taught;
      c) qualitative student evaluation of skill development throughout the curriculum as administered in a required major capstone course (GEOG 418).

    4. Capitalize on learning experiences through well-designed departmental curriculum, strong academic advising, access to relevant departmental faculty, and opportunities for specialized training and experience.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • 4a. Provided with high quality, relevant and challenging curriculum.
      4b. Provided with strong academic advising and to departmental faculty (as needed).
      4c. Provided with opportunities for specialized training and experience (undergraduate research opportunities, internships, outside work experiences).
    Assessment Method
    • Each of these performance indicators will be assessed through:
      a) qualitative student evaluation of skill development throughout the curriculum as administered in a required major capstone course (GEOG 418);
      b) alumni survey evaluation of programmatic strengths and weaknesses.

    5. Individual Course Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

    Student Performance Indicators
    • 5a. Goals and indicators tailored to each course.
      5b. These will vary according to instructor and course level.
    Assessment Method
    • 5a. Technical, thematic, and regional courses will specify, in the early section of each faculty member's syllabus, specific SLOs for a course. These should dovetail with the overall departmental SLOs, but may demonstrate some significant variation instructor-to-instructor.
      5b. A typical case would be a field methods course, which within geography can be urban, rural, studio-based, organized around the study of a specific phenomenon (water, snow, mountains, arid environments), or grounded in cultural-historical experience and research. Variation is essential.
  • Geography (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    Department faculty promote the careful integration of physical, human, cultural, and resource geography. The program emphasizes the geography of arid lands and landscapes, with a focus on intermountain environments. The program also allows for a focus on geographic education, proficiency in spatial analysis, and the techniques of geographic information systems.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Student will maximize their learning experiences by efficiently progressing through the program.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students develop and submit a program of study for approval by their major advisor during their inaugural year.
    • Students complete all necessary steps to establish their graduate committee.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessment coordinator will track students' completion of programs of study. Data will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.
    • The assessment coordinator will track students' establishment of graduate committees. This information will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.

    2. Students will demonstrate an advanced level of scholarly research by completing a thesis.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students will make consistent progress toward M.S. thesis.
    • Students complete a successful thesis in Geography.
    • Students defend & publicly present the results of their thesis.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessment coordinator will track students' thesis progress. Data will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.
    • The assessment coordinator will track students' thesis completion. Data will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.
    • Faculty attending thesis defense will assess student presentations.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to conduct advanced-level research in physical, human, or cultural geography.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students complete courses within their approved program of study.
    • Students complete written &/or oral comprehensive exams.
    Assessment Method
    • The assessment coordinator will track students' completion of programs of study. Data will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.
    • The assessment coordinator will track students' completion of comprehensive exams. Data will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.

    2. Students will be able to develop links between their work and educational experiences by teaching classes and/or assisting faculty.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students teach classes, assist faculty or teaching assistant in preparation and presentations.
    Assessment Method
    • The assessment committee will assess course, instructor, and/or supervisory evaluations of teaching.
  • Geography (Ph.D.)

    Mission Statement

    Department faculty promote the careful integration of physical, human, cultural, and resource geography. The program emphasizes the geography of arid lands and landscapes, with a focus on inter-mountain environments. The program also allows for a focus on geographic education, proficiency in spatial analysis, and the techniques of geographic information systems. Graduates should be well-prepared for moving into varied career goals, not limited to academic positions.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Student will maximize their learning experiences by efficiently progressing through the program.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students develop and submit a program of study for approval by their major adviser during their inaugural year.
    • Students complete all necessary steps to establish their graduate committee.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessment coordinator will track students' completion of programs of study. Data will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.
    • The assessment coordinator will track students' establishment of graduate committees. This information will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.

    2. Students will demonstrate an advanced level of scholarly research by completing a dissertation.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students will make consistent progress toward PhD dissertation.
    • Students complete a successful dissertation in Geography.
    • Students defend & publicly present the results of their dissertation.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessment coordinator will track students' dissertation progress. Data will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.
    • The assessment coordinator will track students' dissertation completion. Data will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.
    • Faculty attending the dissertation defense will assess student presentations.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to conduct advanced-level research in physical, human, or cultural geography.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students complete courses within their approved program of study.
    • Students complete written & oral comprehensive exams.
    Assessment Method
    • The assessment coordinator will track students' completion of programs of study. Data will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.
    • The assessment coordinator will track students' completion of comprehensive exams. Data will be reviewed by the graduate assessment committee.

    2. Students will be able to develop links between their work and educational experiences by teaching classes and/or assisting faculty.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will teach classes, assist faculty or teaching assistants in preparation and presentations.
    Assessment Method
    • The assessment committee will assess course, instructor, and/or supervisory evaluations of teaching.
  • Land Use Planning Policy (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Geography's LUPP program offers the only Masters Degree in city and regional planning in the state of Nevada.  The program prepares students to become professional planners working for local, county and state governments, as well as private practice.  Student preparation is achieved through a balanced curriculum, internships and part-time work in professional offices, and extra-curricular activities, such as field trips, participation in planning processes, and attending public meetings.

    When active, the program strives to provide students with the practical skills needed for entry level employment, as well as a broader critical perspective that will enable them to develop innovative solutions.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Students will exhibit progress in the LUP Program during their first year following enrollment.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Each Student will form a graduate committee.
    • Each student, in cooperation with their committee chairperson, will develop and submit a formal program of study.
    Assessment Method
    • The LUPP director and committee chairperson will approve the student's graduate committee.
    • The LUPP director and committee chairperson will approve the program of study.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge, skills, and values central to the field of land use planning.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Each student will complete the LUPP core curriculum with satisfactory grades
    Assessment Method
    • LUPP director will review program of study to ascertain that the core courses have been complete with satisfactory grades

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate specialized knowledge in one or two areas of planning.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Each student will schedule and complete a comprehensive exam
    Assessment Method
    • The student's graduate committee will assess the comprehensive exam

    3. Students will be able to demonstrate advanced research skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Each student will write a thesis or professional paper on a topic approved by his committee chairperson and graduate committee. The student will regularly submit draft chapters to his/her graduate committee for critical comment
    Assessment Method
    • The student's graduate committee will assess the thesis or professional paper

Geological Sciences and Engineering

  • Geology (B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering is committed to being nationally and internationally recognized at the forefront in geo-science and geo-engineering education and research and providing the state and national workforce with outstanding graduates having superior knowledge, skills and abilities for effective management of the Earth's non-renewable and environmental resources. As part of this mission, our goals are to provide an outstanding and current undergraduate curriculum in geology. This curriculum places emphasis on technical, analytical, logical thinking and problem solving skills, as well basic and applied knowledge in earth sciences and specific fields of expertise. Graduates with a Bachelors degree should be capable of succeeding in the workplace or as graduate students in geological sciences or related fields.

    Program Outcomes

    1. All graduates will be prepared for post graduate study or to secure employment in a field related to their undergraduate degree.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Student will indicate post-graduate activity through
      • exit interviews
      • Alumni interviews
      • Faculty advisor interviews
    Assessment Method
    • The Geological Sciences Curriculum/Assessment Committee will assess the degree to which participating graduates report accomplishing this outcome.

    2. All students in the program will complete the curriculum in a timely manner. Transfers from other UNR programs will be efficiently integrated into the program.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Student time to graduation
    • Exit Interviews
    • Graduates-to-majors ratio over time
    • Transfer-to-major data
    Assessment Method
    • The Geological Sciences Curriculum/Assessment Committee will assess data supplied by the UNR databook, Arentz Center data, and student self-reporting
    • same
    • same
    • same

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate competence in oral and written communication skills including the ability to write and present independent research, and the ability to read and critically evaluate relevant geological literature.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • All majors meet performance goals during course work.
    • Seniors present independent work through poster sessions each spring.
    • Student/faculty joint publications
    • Student written reports completed during field internship and/or capstone Field Camp (GEOL451)
    • Student internships require a short written summary by the student, and a report by the faculty/employer
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty will report each semester on the performance goals met by students in each undergraduate course at sophomore level and above, using a standard skills-list reporting form. These data will be assembled and assessed by the Department.
    • Students' faculty advisor will assess each senior thesis.
    • The Curriculum/Assessment Committee will assess the number of papers published by faculty with undergraduate co-authors.
    • All graduates of the baccalaureate program will successfully complete GEOL 451 Field Camp (major capstone).
    • Faculty advisor or employer will assess internship reports

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking and reasoning as part of their professional skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Post graduate employment or post graduate study
    • Faculty observation of student skills during the major's capstone course (GEOL 451 - Field Camp)
    • Student written reports completed for internship
    • Employer's report of student activity during internships.
    Assessment Method
    • Alumni and their employers or graduate advisors will be interviewed.
    • Student's faculty advisor or internship faculty/employer will provide the Curriculum/ Assessment Committee with an evaluation of the students' level of professional skill
    • All graduates of the baccalaureate program will successfully complete the 6-week Field Camp (GEOL 451) major's capstone course.
    • Student's faculty advisor or internship faculty/employer will provide the Curriculum/ Assessment Committee with an evaluation of the students' level of professional skill.
  • Geology (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering is committed to being nationally and internationally recognized at the forefront in geo-science and geo-engineering education and research and providing the state and national workforce with outstanding graduates having superior knowledge, skills and abilities for effective management of the Earth's non-renewable and environmental resources. As part of this mission, we offer a Masters degree that serves either as the terminal degree in preparing professionals for the work force as geologists in both the public and private sectors, or prepares them to continue in a PhD in preparation for a research career. This curriculum places emphasis on developing the skills to conduct scientific research, and to expand technical, analytical, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. Graduates will be well prepared to start their careers as geologists in the minerals, petroleum, environmental, or geotechnical industries, or in government organizations.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Students will exhibit timely progress in developing their program of study in MS program during the first year.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Each student, in cooperation with their graduate advisor will:
      • Select a thesis topic
      • enroll in coursework providing background and skills to conduct this research
      • Write a thesis proposal describing the research they planned to do and the timetable they plan to follow
      • Select their committee and hold a meeting to engage committee input and approval
    Assessment Method
    • Annual progress report, due each April 15, will be reviewed to determine what coursework has been completed, whether the student has formed a committee and written their thesis proposal. Report also includes an assessment by the advisor as to the student's progress that year.
    • Copy of proposal will be filed with the graduate director

    2. Students are expected to demonstrate a basic level of competency in the general field of geology and in the subject area of their research.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will write and defend theses.
    • Students' employment in the field of geology
    Assessment Method
    • Each thesis will be reviewed and approved by the thesis committee.
    • Department will review Alumni Survey and other data/statistics for employment rates among graduates.

    3. Graduates are expected to achieve an understanding of geological sciences as well as the problem solving necessary to be prepared for employment or pursue graduate school.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students report employment in geology or a related field that requires technical expertise acquired during the MS degree.
    • Acceptance of graduates into Ph.D. programs.

    Assessment Method

    • Employment and graduate school acceptance statistics will be gathered by the department.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate competence in oral and written communication skills including the ability to write and present independent research, write research proposals, and the ability to read and critically evaluate relevant geological literature.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students orally present their thesis proposal to their committee at a meeting early in their phase of research.
    • Students submit a written thesis proposal
    • Students give a public presentation of their results and their significance as part of their final thesis defense.
    • Students submit research grants to professional organizations to aid in funding their research and travel to meetings.
    • Students present results at professional meeting,
    • Students submit a master's thesis.
    Assessment Method
    • Thesis committee will assess student's proposal presentation and provide feedback to student.
    • Thesis committee will evaluate and provide feedback to student following their proposal presentation.
    • Thesis committee will read and evaluate each thesis draft and give their approval/disapproval.
    • Graduate director will keep statistics on the number of grant proposals submitted by MS students each year, as reported by students in their annual progress reports.
    • Graduate director will keep statistics on the numbers of talks and posters given by MS students at professional meetings, as reported by students in their annual progress reports.
    • Thesis advisor will read and edit drafts of thesis chapters.

    2. Students will be able to complete research in their field of study, including the testing of an hypothesis or answering a specific scientific question or questions formulated in conjunction with the advisor and committee.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students complete thesis.
    • Acceptance of manuscripts for publication in competitive peer-reviewed journals.
    • Completion of degree in a timely manner.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty approve/disapprove thesis.
    • Statistics will be gathered by the department as to the number of publications that include students as authors or co-authors.
    • Program director will track time to degree for students in the program.

    3. Students will be able to demonstrate appropriate quantitative skills for their sub-discipline.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will use standard statistical and data reduction software packages to analyze data trends for theses.
    • Students read and plot data in both linear and log formats.
    Assessment Method
    • Thesis committees will assess quantitative methods used during thesis defense.
    • Thesis advisors will assess individual student's level of quantitative skill through meetings and advisement.
  • Geology (Ph.D.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering is committed to being nationally and internationally recognized at the forefront in geo-science and geo-engineering education and research and providing the state and national workforce with outstanding graduates having superior knowledge, skills and abilities for effective management of the Earth's non-renewable and environmental resources. As part of this mission, we offer a Doctoral degree that prepares them for a career in academia, or as a research geologist in either the public or private sectors. Students engage in career-initiating research in the various sub-disciplines of geology and are guided by faculty who are leaders in these disciplines. The curriculum places emphasis on developing the skills that will make graduates highly competitive for nationally and internationally advertised positions in geology. The skills include the ability to formulate, conduct, complete, and publish high quality scientific research in their field of specialty, grantsmanship, and dissemination of results through technical meetings and peer-reviewed publication.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Students will exhibit timely progress in developing their program of study in PhD program during the first 3 semesters.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Each student, in cooperation with their graduate advisor will:
      • Select a dissertation topic
      • Enroll in coursework providing background and skills to conduct their research
      • Write a dissertation proposal describing the research they plan to do and the timetable they plan to follow
    • Select their committee and hold a meeting to engage committee input and approval
    Assessment Method
    • Annual progress report, due each April 15, will be reviewed to determine what coursework has been completed, whether the student has formed a committee and written their thesis proposal. Report also includes an assessment by the advisor as to the student's progress that year.
    • Copy of proposal will be filed with the graduate director

    2. Graduates will be prepared for employment as professionals, in industry, government, or academia.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Employment in geology or a related field that requires technical expertise acquired during the PhD degree.

    Assessment Method

    • Employment and graduate school acceptance statistics will be gathered by the department.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate a basic level of competency in the general field of geology and expertise in the subject area of their research.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will complete oral and written comprehensive exams.
    • Students will provide an oral defense of their exam answers.
    • Students will obtain employment in their field of specialty
    Assessment Method
    • Assessment of the student's competency in both general and subject areas will be reflected in the quality of their answers during their thesis defense.
    • Dissertation will be reviewed and approved by the thesis committee
    • Department will review statistics for employment rates in graduates.

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate competence in oral and written communication skills including the ability to write and present independent research, the ability to write research proposals, and the ability to read and critically evaluate relevant geological literature.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students orally present their dissertation proposal to their committee at a meeting early in the research phase.
    • Students submit a written dissertation proposal.
    • Students submit a dissertation.
    • Students give a public presentation of their results and their significance as part of their final defense.
    • Students submit research grants to professional organizations to aid in funding their research and travel to meetings.
    • Students present results at professional meetings.
    Assessment Method
    • Advisor will work with student to help them prepare presentations for their committee meetings and defense.
    • Dissertation advisory/examining committee will evaluate and provide feedback to student following their proposal presentation and final defense.
    • Advisor will read and edit drafts of dissertation chapters
    • Advisory/examining committee will read and evaluate the dissertation draft and give their approval/disapproval.
    • Graduate director will keep statistics on the numbers of talks and posters given by PhD students at professional meetings, as reported by students in their annual progress reports.
    • Graduate director will keep statistics on the number of grant proposals submitted by PhD students each year.

    3. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research, including identify a research problem, formulate an hypothesis, and devise a methodology of testing of their hypothesis or answering a specific scientific question or questions, and successfully carrying out the research to completion.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students submit their dissertation proposal
    • Students submit a completed dissertation.
    • Students submit manuscripts for publication in competitive peer-reviewed journals.
    • Students complete their doctoral degree in a timely manner.
    Assessment Method
    • Advisory committee indicates approval/disapproval of the proposal.
    • Student advisory approves/disapproves each student's dissertation.
    • Statistics will be gathered by the department as to the number of publications that include students as authors or co-authors.
    • Program director will track time to degree for students in the program.

    4. Students will be able to demonstrate appropriate quantitative skills for their sub-discipline.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will use standard statistical and data reduction software packages to analyze data trends for theses.
    • Students read and plot data in both linear and log formats.
    Assessment Method
    • Dissertation committees will assess quantitative methods used during thesis defense.
    • Dissertation advisors will assess individual student's level of quantitative skill through meetings and advisement.
  • Geological Engineering (B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    Our goal is to graduate students of high quality possessing state-of-art knowledge in both the science of geology and the fundamentals of engineering. These students will have a high level of knowledge regarding geologic hazards and the mitigation of these hazards, also geomechanics, environmental remediation, and geotechnical engineering. BSGE students will be highly competitive for graduate school admission or for professional employment. These students will be recognized as among the best nationally. In order to meet and exceed these Mission objectives, three(3) Program Educational Objectives (PEO)are established and regularly assessed: PEO 1. Graduates will demonstrate the ability to apply design principles in a variety of design situations; PEO 2. Graduates will demonstrate a solid and broad foundation in fundamental principles, both theoretical and practical, of mathematics, science, and engineering enabling them to excel in professional employment as well as in post-graduate education; and PEO 3. Graduates will demonstrate knowledge of the larger contexts of the application of their engineering, including global, environmental, societal, and legal concerns and will be able to communicate these concepts.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to articulate the design process and apply this knowledge to a variety of project situations to ensure safe and effective human interface with the earth. Program Educational Objective(s): PEO-1; PEO-2; PEO-3; ABET Student Outcomes a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, and k.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Performance in GE 487, geological engineering design; performance on the FE exam; ability to secure employment in the field
    Assessment Method
    • Instructor evaluation of students' abilities in GE 487; FE exam results; Senior Exit Examination

    2. Students will learn how to solve real engineering problems that involve engineering ethics and environmental health & safety. Program Educational Objectives: PEO-3; ABET Student Outcomes a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Abilities demonstrated in GE 385, GE 480, GE 483, and GE 487; on-the-job performance, if possible to assess.
    Assessment Method
    • Instructor evaluation of performance in GE 280, 385, 483, and 487; external review of GE 487 design projects

    3. Students will understand the historical context of society, and they will be able to interact effectively with non-engineers. Program Educational Objectives: PEO-3; ABET Student Outcomes a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Performance in and attitudes about Core Curriculum courses.
    Assessment Method
    • Performance on Senior Exit Examination

    4. Graduates will be able to communicate effectively. Program Educational Objective: PEO-3; ABET Student Outcomes a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k

    Student Performance Indicators
    • As of December, 2009, the geological engineering curriculum allows students to enroll in ENGR 301 or COM 101. Student performance in either class will be assessed.
    Assessment Method
    • Regular review of syllabus for ENGR 301 and COM 101; review of student performance data; feedback from external review of GE 487 design projects

    5. Students will gain the mathematical and scientific knowledge and comprehension, moreover will be able to apply this knowledge when solving engineering problems. Program educational objectives: PEO-2; PEO-3; ABET Student Outcomes a, e, h, i, j, k

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Performance on the FE (Fundamentals of Engineering Examination)- this indicating the acquisition of knowledge. Students performance in all 400-level GE courses, esp. GE 487, indicating the ability to apply this knowledge.
    Assessment Method
    • Regular inspection of FE performance data, and evaluating the GE curriculum against these data. Instructor evaluation of 400-level GE courses.
  • Geological Engineering (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The Master of Science degree program in geological engineering is designed to produce a self-motivated engineer possessing state-of-art knowledge in one or more of the following areas: geologic hazards, geomechanics, planetary geology, remote sensing and digital image processing, environmental remediation, instrumental methods, and data analysis. Graduates will possess outstanding written and oral communication skills, be capable of independently conducting research projects from inception through conclusion, and are qualified for professional registration.

    Program Outcomes

    1. MSGE students will learn diligence through timely degree completion.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Successful degree completion

    Assessment Method

    • Median length of time to complete degrees

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. For MSGE students entering the program with non-engineering undergraduate degrees, students will be able to master the fundamental core engineering curriculum to enable the taking and passing of the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Success on FE exam
    Assessment Method
    • Success versus failure rate for MSGE students taking FE exam

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate improving written and oral communication skills through teaching, professional presentations, publication in scientific journals, writing a thesis or professional paper, and/or presenting a conference paper orally or in poster session.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Performance in a TA position;Mentoring undergraduate students; Oral presentations in the Graduate Seminar
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty evaluation of TA performance; Faculty documentation of mentoring or tutoring; faculty evaluation of oral presentations

    3.  Students will be able to prove themselves self starters in their studies and research.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Student success in 700-level graduate courses; successful completion of a thesis or Professional Paper
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty rating of students' self motivation skills

  • Geo-Engineering (Ph.D.) (with Mining Engineering)

    Mission Statement

    The Geoengineering Ph.D. program, jointly administered by geological engineering and mining engineering faculty, was granted by the Board of Regents, University and Community College System of Nevada, in 1999. The first Ph.D. degree in this program was conferred in 2000. Since then, an additional degree has been conferred and six students are presently making progress toward degree completion. Our primary goal is to graduate highly competent individuals, competitive for university, government, or industry appointments. These individuals will be recognized as among the best in their fields through successful publication in refereed journals and successful employment at a level commensurate with Ph.D. qualification.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Geoengineering students will be prepared to be competitive for employment post degree conference.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Ability to secure employment as desired

    Assessment Method

    • Faculty evaluation of student success; faculty have the responsibility for mentoring in this regard

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to contribute to state-of-art knowledge in the earth sciences by writing research proposals, presenting at national and international meetings, submitting articles to refereed journal.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Submission of articles to refereed journals; presentations at national and international meetings.
    Assessment Method
    • Outcome of peer-review from journals, measuring success against failure; Faculty review of student progress; faculty review of presentations at meetings

    2.  Students will be able to demonstrate effective self-motivational skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students must demonstrate creative participation in their degree program, particularly in regard to performance in research culminating in a successful defense of dissertation
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty evaluation of students? abilities to be creative; faculty have responsibility for mentoring in this regard.

    3. Students will be able to demonstrate written and oral communication skills by writing research proposals, conducting research, and teaching.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Completion of research proposal(s), either for practice or with the serious intent to secure research funding.
    • Ratings as a teacher when employed as a TA;Review of mentoring and tutoring activity;Participation in outreach to K-12 education;Oral presentations to groups;quality of writing of research papers and dissertation.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty evaluation of effort through effective mentoring.
    • Faculty evaluation of the student performance metrics.

  • Geophysics (B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering is committed to being nationally and internationally recognized at the forefront in geo-science and geo-engineering education and research, and to providing the state and national workforce with outstanding graduates having superior knowledge, skills and abilities for effective management of the Earth's non-renewable and environmental resources. As part of this mission, the Geophysics Bachelors of Science Degree Program offers an outstanding undergraduate geophysics curriculum that provides students with a broad and rigorous multidisciplinary foundation of knowledge, problem-solving and analytical skills for successful pursuit of an advanced science degree or a technical career. Many of this program's graduates go on to pursue advanced earth sciences degrees, however, many others are employed directly by government agencies and private industry in fields, including, resource exploration, environmental monitoring, geotechnical engineering, natural hazard assessment and geographic information systems and land management.

    Program Outcomes

    1. All graduates will be prepared for post graduate study or to secure employment in a field related to their undergraduate degree.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Student will indicate post-graduate activity through: Exit interviews, Alumni interviews, and Faculty advisor interviews
    Assessment Method
    • The Geological Sciences Curriculum/Assessment Committee will assess the degree to which participating graduates report accomplishing this outcome.

    2. All Students will complete the curriculum in a timely manner appropriate to their personal circumstances. Transfers from other UNR programs will be efficiently integrated into the program.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Graduates-to-majors ratio over time
    • Transfer-to-major data
    • Student time to graduation
    • Exit interviews
    Assessment Method
    • The Geological Sciences Curriculum/Assessment Committee will assess data supplied by UNR databook, Arentz Center data, and student self-reporting.
    • same
    • same
    • same

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate competence in oral and written communication skills including the ability to write and present independent research, and the ability to read and critically evaluate relevant geoscience literature.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • All majors meet performance goals during course work.
    • Seniors present independent work through poster sessions each spring.
    • Student/faculty joint publications
    • Student written reports completed during summer internships, and senior course work Geophysics and Geodynamics (GPH455) and Exploration Geophysics (GPH492).
    • Student internships require a short written summary by the student, and a report by the faculty/employer
    Assessment Method
    • Using a Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering standard Skills Assessment Form, Department teaching faculty will report each semester on performance goals met by geophysics program students enrolled in their courses at the sophomore to senior levels. These data will be assembled by the Department and assessed by the Curriculum/ Assessment Committee.
    • Students' faculty advisor will assess each senior thesis.
    • The Curriculum/Assessment Committee will assess the number of papers published by faculty with undergraduate co-authors.
    • All graduates of the baccalaureate program will successfully complete Geophysics and Geodynamics (GPH455) and Exploration Geophysics (GPH492).
    • Faculty advisor or employer will assess internship reports.

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking and reasoning as part of their professional skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Faculty observation of student skills during Geophysics and Geodynamics (GPH455) and Exploration Geophysics (GPH492).
    • Post graduate employment or post graduate study
    • Student written reports completed for internship
    • Employer's report of student activity during internships.
    Assessment Method
    • All graduates of the baccalaureate program will successfully complete Geophysics and Geodynamics (GPH455) and Exploration Geophysics (GPH492).
    • Alumni and their employers or graduate advisors will be interviewed.
    • Student's faculty advisor or internship faculty/employer will provide the Curriculum/ Assessment Committee with an evaluation of the students' level of professional skill.
    • Student's faculty advisor or internship faculty/employer will provide the Curriculum/ Assessment Committee with an evaluation of the students' level of professional skill.
  • Geophysics (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering is committed to being nationally and internationally recognized at the forefront in geo-science and geo-engineering education and research and providing the state and national workforce with outstanding graduates having superior knowledge, skills and abilities for effective management of the Earth's non-renewable and environmental resources. As part of this mission, we offer a Masters degree that serves either as the terminal degree in preparing professionals for the work force as geophysicists in both the public and private sectors, or prepares them to continue in a PhD in preparation for a research career. This curriculum places emphasis on developing the skills to conduct scientific research, and to expand technical, analytical, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. Graduates will be well prepared to start their careers as geophysicists in the minerals, petroleum, environmental, or geotechnical industries, or in government organizations.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Students will exhibit timely progress in developing their program of study during the first year.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Each student, in cooperation with their graduate advisor will:
      - Select a thesis topic;
      - Enroll in coursework providing background and skills to conduct this research;
      - Write a thesis proposal describing the research they plan to do and timetable they plan to follow; and
      - Select their committee and hold a meeting to engage committee input and approval.
    Assessment Method
    • Annual progress report, due each April 15, will be reviewed to determine what coursework has been completed, whether the student has formed a committee and written their thesis proposal. Report also includes an assessment by the advisor as to the student's progress that year. A copy of the proposal will be filed with the graduate director.

    2. Graduates will be prepared for employment as professionals, or to continue for a Ph.D.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students report employment in geophysics or a related field that requires technical expertise acquired during the MS degree.
    • Acceptance of graduates into Ph.D. programs.

    Assessment Method

    • Employment and graduate school acceptance statistics will be gathered by the department.
    • same

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate a basic level of competency in the general field of geophysics and in the subject area of their research.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • If students have not completed the equivalent of GPH 655 and GPH 692 in their undergraduate preparation they will be required to enroll in these classes.
    • Students will write and defend their thesis
    • Students' employment in the field of geophysics
    Assessment Method
    • Assessment of the student's competency in general geophysics areas will be reflected in the grades received in GPH 655 and GPH 692 or their equivalent at the undergraduate institution.
    • Each thesis will be reviewed and approved by the thesis committee
    • Department will review Alumni Survey and other data/statistics for employment rates among graduates

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate competence in oral and written communication skills including the ability to write and present independent research, and the ability to read and critically evaluate relevant geosciences literature.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students submit a written thesis proposal and orally present their proposal to their committee at a meeting early in their phase of research
    • Students give a public presentation of their results and their significance as part of their final thesis defense
    • Students present results at professional meetings.
    • Students submit a master's thesis as chapter drafts and final drafts
    Assessment Method
    • Thesis committee will assess student's proposal presentation and written proposal and provide feedback to student
    • Thesis committees will assess communication and research competency during thesis defense
    • Graduate director will keep statistics on the numbers of talks and posters given by MS students at professional meetings, as reported by students in their annual progress reports
    • Thesis committee will read and evaluate each thesis draft and give their approval/disapproval and Thesis advisor will edit drafts of thesis chapters

    3. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to complete research in their field of study, including the testing of an hypothesis or answering a specific scientific question or questions formulated in conjunction with the advisor and committee.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students complete thesis
    • Acceptance of conference papers and manuscripts for publication in peer-reviewed journals
    • Completion of degree in a timely manner
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty approve/disapprove thesis
    • Statistics will be gathered by the department as to the number of publications that include students as authors or co-authors
    • Program director will track time to degree for students in the program

    4. Students will be able to demonstrate appropriate quantitative skills for their sub-discipline.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will utilize appropriate data and error analysis methodologies in their research
    • Students will master professional and/or research geophysical processing and analysis software appropriate to their specialty
    Assessment Method
    • Thesis committees will assess quantitative methods used during thesis defense
    • Thesis advisors will assess individual student's level of quantitative skill through meetings and advisement

  • Geophysics (Ph.D.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering is committed to being nationally and internationally recognized at the forefront in geo-science and geo-engineering education and research and providing the state and national workforce with outstanding graduates having superior knowledge, skills and abilities for effective management of the Earth's non-renewable and environmental resources. As part of this mission, we offer a Doctoral degree that prepares them for a career in academia, or as a research geophysicist in either the public or private sectors. Students engage in career-initiating research in the various sub-disciplines of geophysics and are guided by faculty who are leaders in these disciplines. The curriculum places emphasis on developing the skills that will make graduates highly competitive for nationally and internationally advertised positions in geophysics. The skills include the ability to formulate, conduct, complete, and publish high quality scientific research in their field of specialty, grantsmanship, and dissemination of results through technical meetings and peer-reviewed publication.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will exhibit timely progress in developing their program of study during the first 3 semesters.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Each student, in cooperation with their graduate advisor will:
      • Select a dissertation topic;
      • Enroll in coursework providing background and skills to conduct their research
      • Write a dissertation proposal describing their planned research activities and the timetable; and,
      • Select their committee and hold a meeting to engage committee input and approval
    Assessment Method
    • Annual progress report, due each April 15, will be reviewed to determine what coursework has been completed, whether the student has formed a committee and written their thesis proposal. Report also includes an assessment by the advisor as to the student's progress that year. A copy of the proposal will be filed with the graduate director.

    2. Students are expected to demonstrate a basic level of competency in the general field of geophysics and expertise in the subject area of their research.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will complete a qualifying exam held during the first year
    • Students will complete oral and written comprehensive exams and give an oral defense of their exam answers
    • Students write and submit chapter drafts and a final dissertation draft for approval
    • Students will obtain employment in their field of specialty
    Assessment Method
    • The advisory/examining committee shall construct and grade all exams and a grade of pass, fail or marginal pass will be given
    • Assessment of the student's competency in both general and subject areas will be reflected in the quality of their oral and written answers
    • Dissertation will be reviewed and approved by the committee
    • Department will review statistics for employment rates in graduates

    3. The student will demonstrate competence in oral and written communication skills including the ability to write and present independent research, the ability to write research proposals, and the ability to read and critically evaluate relevant geoscience literature.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students submit a written dissertation proposal
    • Students orally present their dissertation proposal to their committee at a meeting early in the research phase
    • Students write and submit chapter drafts and a final dissertation draft for approval
    • Students give a public presentation of their results and their significance as part of a dissertation final defense
    • Students submit research grants to professional organizations to aid in funding their research and travel to meetings
    • Students present results at professional meetings
    Assessment Method
    • Dissertation committee will evaluate and provide feedback to students written proposal
    • Dissertation committee will assess student's proposal presentation and provide feedback to student
    • Advisor will read and edit drafts of dissertation chapters. Advisory/examining committee will read and evaluate the dissertation draft and give their approval/disapproval
    • Dissertation advisory/examining committee will evaluate and provide feedback to student following their presentation and final defense
    • Graduate director will keep statistics on the number of grant proposals submitted by PhD students each year
    • Graduate director will keep statistics on the numbers of talks and posters given by PhD students at professional meetings, as reported by students in their annual progress reports

    4. The student must demonstrate ability to conduct independent research, including identify a research problem, formulate an hypothesis, and devise a methodology of testing of their hypothesis or answering a specific scientific question or questions, and successfully carrying out the research to completion.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students submit their dissertation proposal
    • Students submit a completed dissertation
    • Students submit manuscripts for publication in competitive peer-reviewed journals
    • Students complete their doctoral degree in a timely manner
    Assessment Method
    • Advisory committee indicates approval/disapproval of the proposal
    • Student advisory approves/disapproves each student's dissertation
    • Statistics will be gathered by the department as to the number of publications that include students as authors or co-authors
    • Program director will track time to degree for students in the program

    5. Graduates will be employed as professionals, in industry, government, or academia.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Employment in geophysics or a related field that requires technical expertise acquired during the PhD degree
    Assessment Method
    • Employment statistics will be gathered by the department

    6. Students must demonstrate appropriate quantitative skills for their sub-discipline.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will utilize appropriate data and error analysis methodologies in their research
    • Students will master professional and/or research geophysical processing and analysis software appropriate to their specialty
    Assessment Method
    • Dissertation committees will assess quantitative methods used during thesis defense
    • Dissertation advisors will assess individual student's level of quantitative skill through meetings and advisement
  • Hydrogeology (B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Geological Sciences is committed to being nationally and internationally recognized at the forefront in geo-science and geo-engineering education and research and providing the state and national workforce with outstanding graduates having superior knowledge, skills and abilities for effective management of the Earth's resources. The Hydrogeology Bachelor's of Science Degree Program offers a broad yet rigorous interdisciplinary foundation of technical, analytical, logical thinking and problem solving skills, as well basic and applied knowledge in water resources as they apply to subsurface resources. The curriculum draws upon courses taught within the Department, as well as courses from the engineering and agricultural sciences to provide students with the skills necessary to succeed in the workplace or as graduate students in geological sciences or related fields.

    Program Outcomes

    1. All graduates will be prepared for post graduate study or to secure employment in a field related to their undergraduate degree.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Student will indicate post-graduate activity through
      • Exit interviews
      • Alumni interviews
      • Faculty advisor interviews
    Assessment Method
    • The Geological Sciences Curriculum/Assessment Committee will assess the degree to which participating graduates report accomplishing this outcome.

    2. All students in the program will complete the curriculum in a timely manner. Transfers from other UNR programs will be efficiently integrated into the program.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Student time to graduation
    • Exit Interviews
    • Graduates-to-majors ratio over time
    • Transfer-to-major data
    Assessment Method
    • The Geological Sciences Curriculum/Assessment Committee will assess data supplied by the UNR databook, Arentz Center data, and student self-reporting.
    • Same for each Performance Indicators

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate competence in oral and written communication skills including the ability to write and present independent research, and the ability to read and critically evaluate relevant geological literature.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • All majors meet performance goals during course work
    • Seniors present independent work through poster sessions each spring
    • Student/faculty joint publications
    • Student written reports completed during field internship, Ground Water Hydrology (GE 484) and Field Camp (GEOL 451).
    • Students, during their internships, are required to submit short written summary of their experience. A report by the faculty/employer is also submitted.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty will report each semester on the performance goals met by students in each undergraduate course at the sophomore level and above, using a standard skills-list reporting form. These data will be assembled and assessed by the Department.
    • The Curriculum/Assessment Committee will assess the participation and skills evident at posters presented by majors at the College-wide poster session.
    • The Curriculum/Assessment Committee will assess the number of papers published by faculty with undergraduate co-authors.
    • All graduates of the baccalaureate program will successfully complete Ground Water Hydrology (GE 484) and Field Camp (GEOL 451, major capstone). Faculty advisor will assess student written reports in GE 484 and GEOL 451.
    • Faculty advisor or employer will assess internship reports and student written reports in GE 484 and GEOL 451.

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking and reasoning as part of their professional skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Faculty observation of student skills during the major's capstone course (GEOL 451 - Field Camp) and Ground Water Hydrology (GE 484)
    • Post graduate employment or post graduate study
    • Employer's report of student activity during internships
    Assessment Method
    • All graduates of the baccalaureate program will successfully complete the 6-week Field Camp (GEOL 451); the major's capstone course and Ground Water Hydrology (GE 484). Student's faculty advisor or internship faculty/employer will provide the Curriculum/ Assessment Committee with an evaluation of the students' level of professional skill in these courses.
    • Alumni and their employers or graduate advisors will be interviewed by the Curriculum/Assessment Committee
    • Student's faculty advisor or internship faculty/employer will provide the Assessment Coordinator with an evaluation of students' level of professional skill.

Mathematics and Statistics

  • Mathematics (B.A. and B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    To be successful in today's technological society one must be mathematically literate or at least have basic quantitative skills. Therefore a major part of our mission is to provide the very best instruction and up-to-date programs in the mathematical sciences for our own majors as well as students from other fields. A big part of this instructional mission involves our contribution to the Core Curriculum.

    One of our constituencies consists of students who are preparing to become teachers in the public schools. There is no more important mission than to ensure adequate training for these students.

    Another fundamentally important facet of our mission, especially in relation to our graduate program, is to contribute to the advancement of knowledge and understanding in the mathematical sciences, including cutting-edge research. This also encompasses creative innovations in educational delivery.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate problem solving and modeling, which includes appreciating the connections between applications and theory. This means translating a real world problem into an abstract model, applying mathematical/stochastic tools to solve the problem, and then translating the solution back to real world terms.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Our capstone course is Math 420 (Mathematical Modeling). Student performance in this course is a good indicator.
    • The course Math 461 (Probability Theory) is required of all degrees and options. Performance in this course is an indicator.
    Assessment Method
    • Administering faculty assessments of skills in Math 420. Grades are based on objective assessment of written reports or projects.
    • Administering faculty assessments of skills in Math 461. Grades are based on objective examinations.
    • Student self-assessment of learning outcomes.

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the nature of mathematical proofs. Learning how to make rigorous mathematical arguments.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students exhibit ability to communicate a logically coherent proof of a mathematical theorem.
    • Math 310 and 311 (Introduction to Analysis I and II), 331 (Groups, Rings, and Fields), and 440 (Topology) are courses in which this learning outcome is a prominent objective. Student performance particularly in Math 310, taken by all math majors, is therefore a good indicator.
    Assessment Method
    • Administering objective assessments of skill development for each course taught.
    • Administering objective faculty assessments of skill development for each of these courses.
      (1) Grades are based on objective examinations.
      (2) Instructor compiles a portfolio of representative student work.
      (3) Students write an assessment of their experience with the course.

    3. Students will be able to demonstrate computer literacy by using technology to solve problems and make conjectures.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • The Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics requires two courses in computer science. Performance in these courses is a good indicator.
    • Ability to use appropriate software to solve a problem. Our capstone course, Math 420 involves this skill and student performance in it is a good indicator.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty assessment of student performance in Computer Science I and II.
    • Administering faculty assessments of skills in Math 420.
      (1) Grades are based on objective assessment of written reports or projects, which include use of computer technology.
      (2) Instructors compile a representative portfolio of student use of technology, including a summary statement.
      (3) Students do a self assessment of their technology experience.
  • Mathematics (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The primary goal is to provide quality education and knowledge in various areas of the mathematical sciences depending on which one of three options the student chooses: pure mathematics, applied mathematics, or statistics.

    Students will be provided with in-depth treatment of the appropriate subjects in the mathematical sciences that will prepare them to face the challenge of their future endeavor: working in an industrial setting; teaching in an academic institution; or continuing studies toward a PhD degree at another institution.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Students will be prepared for further graduate studies or employment in an academic or industrial setting that uses the skills developed in the process of working toward a Master degree.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Employment upon graduation or acceptance to a doctoral program.
    Assessment Method
    • The Graduate Committee director interviews all graduating students.
    • Alumni survey of employment.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of fundamental concepts in real analysis.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • All Masters students take a certain set of required courses, including Math 713 (Abstract Real Analysis), that depend on their track of study. Performance in these courses is an indicator.
    • Those Masters students who write theses must demonstrate knowledge of the topics in the thesis.
    • All non-thesis students must demonstrate knowledge of a basic core of material set forth in a comprehensive examination over core material.
    Assessment Method
    • An independent committee administers objective assessments of skill development for those required courses.
    • In preparation of the thesis and in the final thesis examination. The student's advisor and members of the thesis committee evaluate the work.
    • Examination committee evaluates performance noting strengths and weaknesses and reports results to the Graduate and Assessment Committees.

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate problem solving skills and ability to construct rigorous mathematical arguments.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students exhibit ability to communicate a logically coherent proof of a mathematical theorem.
    • Student self-assessment of learning outcomes.
    Assessment Method
    • An independent committee administers objective assessments of skill development for each course.
    • Departmental exit interviews are conducted by the graduate director for each graduating Masters student.

Mining Engineering

  • Mining Engineering (B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Mining Engineering program at UNR is to provide a quality education that prepares students for the challenges and opportunities statewide and worldwide in mining engineering.  Classroom, laboratory, and field experiences will provide a solid foundation in mine design, surveying, rock fragmentation,mine ventilation, ground control, materials handling, resource/reserve estimation,mine feasibility, mineral processing, computer applications, automation and control, and safety and environmental impacts. Graduates will be prepared for industrial and government employment or for advanced university studies.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will demonstrate proficiency in the mathematics, science, and engineering areas necessary to identify, formulate, and solve practical engineering problems.  The program will maintain compliance with ABET Accreditation.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Successful completion of mathematics, science, and foundational engineering courses.
    • Performance on the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.
    Assessment Method
    • Performance in mathematics, science, and foundational engineering courses.
    • Pass rate on the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.
    • Accreditation status of program.

    2. Students will demonstrate proficiency in engineering topics related to surface and underground mining.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Written, oral, and laboratory performance in the mining engineering curriculum.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty evaluation of performance in Mining Methods, Materials Handling, Mineral Processing, Rock Mechanics, Environmental Control, and Resource/Reserve Estimation

    3. Students will demonstrate the ability to plan and design a technically sound mine in an ethically, environmentally, and socially responsible manner.  Moreover, students will be able to communicate plans, designs, and operational practices to mine representatives,regulators, and the public.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Oral and written presentations of surface and/or underground mine plans, designs, and feasibility studies that conform to accepted design principles.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty and mine representative evaluations of senior design projects and presentations in Underground Mine Design, Surface Mine Design, and Mine Feasibility.
    • Student self-evaluation of senior design projects and relevant coursework.

    4. Students will be prepared for entry-level positions in the operations and management of mines,or for graduate-level study in engineering.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Work experience within the mining industry during undergraduate studies.
    • Employment upon graduation.
    • Acceptance to graduate school.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty evaluations of reports for Mineral Industry Practicum and Mineral Industry Employment.
    • Written evaluations from internship and employment supervisors.
    • Senior exit interviews.
    • Alumni and employer surveys.
  • Mining Engineering (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Mining Engineering graduate program at UNR is to provide a quality education that prepares students to be engineering professionals having the knowledge, skill, and problem-solving abilities necessary to enhance the economic well being, safety and security of society in Nevada and the world through the production of materials in an economic and environmentally responsible manner.  Graduates will be prepared for industrial and government employment, research positions, or for further advanced studies.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will progress through required and elective coursework; development of a committee, research topic and program of study; and completion of a thesis or professional paper in a timely manner.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Timely completion of coursework
    • Development of a committee and research topic, and submission of program of study
    • Completion of degree
    Assessment Method
    • Performance and progression through required and elective coursework
    • Time to establishment of research advisor and submission of program of study
    • Time to completion of degree

    2. Students will demonstrate proficiency in fundamental mining engineering topic.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Written, oral, and laboratory performance in the graduate mining engineering curriculum.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty evaluation of performance in core graduate mining engineering courses.

    3. Students will demonstrate written and oral presentation skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Oral and written presentations of research and thesis work
    • Authorship on professional manuscripts
    • Presentations at professional meetings
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty and mine representative evaluations of research and thesis presentations, both written and oral
    • Number of professional manuscripts with student authors
    • Number of student presentations at professional meetings

    4. Students will be prepared for positions in the operations and management of mines, or for further graduate studies.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Acceptance to further graduate studies
    • Work experience or research support within the mining industry during graduate studies
    • Employment upon graduation
    Assessment Method
    • Written evaluations from internship and employment supervisors
    • Exit interviews
    • Alumni and employer surveys
    • Research support from industry for graduate assistants
    • Work and internship participation of graduate students
  • Metallurgical Engineering (B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Metallurgical Engineering program at UNR is to provide a quality education that prepares students for the challenges and opportunities statewide and worldwide in metallurgical engineering.  Classroom, laboratory, and field experiences will provide a solid foundation in hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, materials handling, mineral processing, process selection and design, computer applications, automation and control, and safety and environmental impacts. Graduates will be prepared for industrial and government employment or for advanced university studies.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will demonstrate proficiency in the mathematics, science, and engineering areas necessary to identify, formulate, and solve practical engineering problems.  The program will maintain compliance with ABET Accreditation.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Performance on the Fundamentals of Engineering exam
    • Successful completion of mathematics, science, and foundational engineering courses
    Assessment Method
    • Pass rate on the Fundamentals of Engineering exam
    • Accreditation status of program
    • Performance in mathematics, science, and foundational engineering courses

    2. Students will demonstrate proficiency in engineering topics related to metallurgical engineering.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Written, oral, and laboratory performance in the metallurgical engineering curriculum.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty evaluation of performance in Mining Methods, Materials Handling, Mineral Processing, Pyrometallurgy, Hydrometallurgy, and Extractive Metallurgy
    • Student self-evaluation of relevant ABET SLOs in related coursework

    3. Students will demonstrate the ability to plan and design a technically sound extractive metallurgical and mineral process in an ethically, environmentally, and socially responsible manner.  Moreover, students will be able to communicate plans, designs, and operational practices to mine representatives, regulators, and the public.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Oral and written presentations of projects in metallurgical design, process, modeling, and control that conform to accepted design principles.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty and industry representative evaluations of senior design projects and presentations in Metallurgical Process, Modeling and Control, and Metallurgical Design
    • Student self-evaluation of senior design projects and relevant coursework

    4. Students will be prepared for entry-level positions in the operations and management of metallurgical and mineral processes, or for graduate-level study in engineering.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Work experience within the minerals industry during undergraduate studies
    • Employment upon graduation
    • Acceptance into graduate school
    Assessment Method
    • Written evaluations from internship and employment supervisors
    • Senior exit interviews
    • Alumni and employer surveys
  • Metallurgical Engineering (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Metallurgical Engineering graduate program at UNR is to provide a quality education that prepares students to be engineering professionals having the knowledge, skill, and problem-solving abilities necessary to enhance the economic well being, safety and security of society in Nevada and the world through the production of materials in an economic and environmentally responsible manner.  Graduates will be prepared for industrial and government employment, research positions, or for further advanced studies.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will progress through required and elective coursework; development of a committee, research topic and program of study; and completion of a thesis or professional paper in a timely manner.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Timely completion of coursework
    • Development of a committee and research topic, and submission of program of study
    • Completion of degree
    Assessment Method
    • Performance and progression through required and elective coursework
    • Time to establishment of research advisor and submission of program of study
    • Time to completion of degree

    2. Students will demonstrate proficiency in fundamental metallurgical engineering topics.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Written, oral, and laboratory performance in the graduate metallurgical engineering curriculum.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty evaluation of performance in core graduate metallurgical engineering courses

    3. Students will demonstrate written and oral presentation skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Oral and written presentations of research and thesis work
    • Authorship on professional manuscripts
    • Presentations at professional meetings
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty and mine representative evaluations of research and thesis presentations, both written and oral
    • Number of professional manuscripts with student authors
    • Number of student presentations at professional meetings

    4. Students will be prepared for positions in the operations and management of extractive metallurgical and mineral processes, or for further graduate studies.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Work experience or research support within the minerals industry during graduate studies
    • Employment upon graduation
    • Acceptance to further graduate studies
    Assessment Method
    • Research support from industry for graduate assistants
    • Work and internship participation of graduate students
    • Written evaluations from internship and employment supervisors
    • Exit interviews
    • Alumni and employer surveys

Physics

  • Nursing B.S.N.

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the UNR Atmospheric Sciences B.S. degree in Atmospheric Sciences is to train undergraduate students in the technological and theoretical foundations of meteorology, atmospheric physics, climate and air quality, and to prepare these scientists to be leaders in the multiple avenues of atmospheric research and education.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the theoretical basis and observational methods for study of atmospheric physics, air pollution, meteorological and climate-scale processes in the Earth's atmosphere.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Descriptive, physical and mathematical accuracy in coursework
    • Originality and scientific quality of Senior Thesis project
    • Participation in undergraduate research and ability to mentor younger students
    Assessment Method
    • Course grades
    • Evaluation of Senior Thesis scientific content by faculty advisors
    • Advisor annual summary of undergraduate research projects, mentoring or professional skills of students

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the design and use of instrumentation, computer software, data interpretation methods for atmospheric research and monitoring.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Operation of instrumentation and analysis of data in laboratory, field and computer projects.
    • Performance in summarizing research methods
    • Composition of Student Portfolios
    Assessment Method
    • Grades in courses that emphasize instrumentation, laboratory work and computer applications
    • Evaluation of Senior Thesis methodologies by faculty advisors
    • Advisor review of research techniques, elective course choices, and professional activities documented in Student Portfolios

    3. Students will be able to explain ideas and results through written, numerical, graphical, spoken, and computer-based forms of communication.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Narrative essays
    • Research project reports
    • Oral presentations within courses
    • Presentation of Senior Thesis and other seminars
    Assessment Method
    • Grades on final exams that emphasize essay presentations
    • Grades on course projects that emphasize summary and presentation of datasets and computer analysis
    • Grades for course activities that require presentations
    • Faculty evaluation of Senior Thesis presentation and other seminars

    4. Students will be able to assess and adapt to new avenues of scientific inquiry which offer interdisciplinary and practical applications to commercial and public needs for atmospheric studies.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Understanding of broader implications and applications of atmospheric sciences
    • Performance in interdisciplinary studies
    • Employer opinions during pre-graduate internships or post-graduate appointments
    • Alumni opinions while in post-graduate appointments and other career activities
    Assessment Method
    • Performance in Capstone and interdisciplinary courses
    • Course grades in approved upper-division elective coursework
    • Employer surveys
    • Alumni surveys
  • Physics (B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    Our mission is to provide a quality education that prepares students for the challenges and opportunities presented by our modern technical society. Rigorous classroom instruction and laboratory experiences using modern equipment and computers provide broad insight into nature and technology

    We seek to provide forefront research opportunities and experiences for both undergraduate and graduate students, and to address state and national priorities in competitive research programs.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental laws of classical and modern physics.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Graduate school admission test scores
    • Written and publicly presented senior research project
    • Student feedback.
    Assessment Method
    • GRE exam scores
    • Faculty committee will evaluate and rate student senior theses and oral presentations. (rubric)
    • Student exit interviews.

    2. Students will be able to report and communicate the results of experimental/theoretical investigation and research.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Laboratory reports from introductory, intermediate, advanced labs.
    • Written and publically presented senior thesis.
    • Student feedback.
    • Research and practical internships and experiences.
    Assessment Method
    • The Physics undergraduate studies committee will review student portfolios annually. (rubric)
    • The undergraduate committee review senior theses and oral presentations. (rubric)
    • Student exit interviews.
    • Student opportunities, awards, papers, presentations, posters, and supervisory evaluations.

    3. Students will be able to demonstrate appropriate quantitative and analytical skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Graduate schools admission test scores.
    • Term papers, tests, and homework assignments from selected upper division courses.
    Assessment Method
    • GRE exam scores
    • Members of the Physics Undergraduate Studies Committee will review student portfolios annually. (rubric)
  • Physics (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    Our mission is to provide a quality education that prepares students for the challenges and opportunities presented by our modern technical society. Rigorous classroom instruction and laboratory experiences using modern equipment and computers provide broad insight into nature and technology

    We seek to provide forefront research opportunities and experiences for both undergraduate and graduate students, and to address state and national priorities in competitive research programs.

    Program Outcomes

    1. The MS program in Physics should provide an excellent preparation for further graduate studies, or for employment in a variety of research and development environments.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Graduate employment
    Assessment Method
    • The Director of Graduate Studies will track graduate careers using surveys.

    2. Physics MS students are expected to complete their course work and research project in a reasonable time.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Annual research report.
    • Program of Study defined by the student and advisor, identifying courses to be taken each semester.
    Assessment Method
    • The Physics department Graduate Studies Committee will review research reports and monitor student progress.
    • The Physics department Graduate Studies Committee will review the Program of Study and monitor student progress annually.
  • Physics (Ph.D.)

    Mission Statement

    Our mission is to provide a quality education that prepares students for the challenges and opportunities presented by our modern technical society. Rigorous classroom instruction and laboratory experiences using modern equipment and computers provide broad insight into nature and technology We seek to provide forefront research opportunities and experiences for both undergraduate and graduate students, and to address state and national priorities in competitive research programs.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Physics PhD students are expected to complete their course work and research project in a reasonable time.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Program of study identifying courses by semester defined by the student and advisor.
    • Annual research report.
    Assessment Method
    • The graduate examining committee will review and approve the program of study
    • The Physics department graduate studies committee will review research reports and monitor student progress.

    2. The PhD program in Physics should provide graduates with skills relevant to research and development environments in academic, National Laboratory, or industrial environments.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Graduate employment
    Assessment Method
    • Track graduates professional careers using surveys.

Psychology

  • Psychology (B.A.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Psychology is a center for scholarship and learning in the discipline of psychology, with responsibilities that extend regionally, nationally, and internationally. The Department seeks not only to teach undergraduate students what is known, but also to expose them to developing knowledge. In doing so, the Department also seeks to instill and develop the methods of creative, critical, scientific inquiry in our students. In all of its actions, the Department seeks to create a safe and supportive learning environment for students that respects diversity, avoids prejudice, maintains an attitude of open and free inquiry, and builds a sense of intellectual community and mutual respect. The Department recognizes the distinction between undergraduates who are pursuing an education in psychology as the basis for a solid liberal arts education poised for success in life beyond UNR and undergraduates who in addition to gaining a solid liberal arts education, are also interested in pursuing advanced professional degrees in psychology or a related field. The Department emphasizes quality instruction that leads to desired learning outcomes for our students, and works to refine and apply new educational technologies within its curriculum in order to produce such outcomes. Thus, the overall mission of the program is to provide a high quality educational experience that prepares students personally and professionally to interpret and use scientific psychological knowledge in a variety of domains, so that they continue to learn and apply psychological perspectives throughout their lifespan. In addition, we seek to prepare students for both post-graduate clinical training and for our graduates to be competitive when pursuing postgraduate research degrees.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Students will demonstrate preparation for careers as scholar-scientists by their preparedness to enter graduate school.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Honors students will complete and defend a thesis project.
    • Students will present case conferences locally as well as workshops at regional and national conferences.
    • Students will complete the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) for admission to graduate programs in psychology.
    • Graduating students will complete exit interviews.

    Assessment Method

    • Faculty will evaluate theses with regard to written and oral quality.
    • Evaluated by number of applied presentations in case conferences, national or regional conferences, and workshops. Performance in professional presentations will be evaluated by faculty supervisor and reported to the assessment committee. Additionally, for those students in the honors program, the thesis will be evaluated in terms of written and oral quality.
    • Advisers will collect and maintain records of GRE scores.
    • Data regarding student success in their pursuit of advanced educational opportunity will be collected and maintained by the department.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings and historic trends in psychology.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will complete exams and assignments in General Psychology (Psy 101 or 103) and additional foundations courses.
    Assessment Method
    • Pre- and post-exams will enable a direct comparison of learning during the course of the initial exposure to psychology. Students will be evaluated by traditional methods, such as successful completion of the course as demonstrated through examination, essay assignments, and class participation.

    2.  Students will be able to demonstrate an appreciation for the relevance of psychology to human affairs, and an ability to think critically and analytically about how psychological matters relate to day-to-day human affairs.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will complete practica in psychology and have hands on experiences in clinical and/or research settings. Supervisors in all direct learning courses will be surveyed to evaluate students' ability to apply psychological knowledge in applied clinical or research settings
    Assessment Method
    • Survey results will be reviewed by the department's executive committee

    3. Students will be able to display effective written and oral communicative skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students demonstrate such skills through written assignments and presentations in foundation and upper division courses. Instructors of 400-level courses will rate student written and oral skills via a program-wide instrument.
    Assessment Method
    • Survey results will be reviewed by the department's executive committee

    4. Students will be able to show diversity awareness by clearly demonstrating that they recognize, understand, and respect community diversity.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will achieve diversity awareness via small group assignments in General Psychology and foundations courses.-Additional diversity awareness will be realized through psychological relevant diversity courses offered within the College of Liberal Arts, including Psychology 431. Faculty surveys will include questions to evaluate students' diversity awareness,.
    Assessment Method
    • The executive committee will review these data

  • Neuroscience (B.A. and B.S.) (with Biology)

    Mission Statement

    The interdisciplinary Bachelor of Science degree in Neuroscience is offered jointly through the Departments of Psychology and Biology. The mission of the program is to provide students comprehensive training in the foundations of modern neuroscience from the cellular to systems level, as well as basic and applied knowledge in general science, psychology, and biology that will allow them to master and critically evaluate knowledge in the field. Directed learning experiences are also included to develop research skills. A major aim of the program is to equip students with the knowledge and skills that will prepare them to successfully pursue graduate studies in a variety of basic and applied disciplines with a neuroscience focus, from cognitive and biological sciences to biotechnology and medicine.

    Program Outcomes

    1. Students will be well prepared and competitive for graduate studies.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Honors students will complete and defend a thesis project
    • Students will present research as authors or coauthors at local or national conferences
    • Students will complete the GRE or MCAT for admission to graduate or medical school
    • Graduating students will complete exit interviews

    Assessment Method

    • Faculty will evaluate theses with regard to written and oral quality
    • The number of presentations will be monitored and student performance will be evaluated by the faculty supervisors
    • GRE and MCAT scores will be tracked through exit surveys
    • Surveys will be reviewed by the co-directors and curriculum committee

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate mastery of core concepts and principles in Neuroscience as well as developing expertise in sub-disciplines within the field.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will demonstrate their comprehension through assignments and presentations in the core upper division courses for the major(Neurobiology and Physiological Psychology), as well as in cluster options in upper division Biology and Psychology courses. Instructors of 400-level courses in the major will be surveyed to evaluate student comprehension.
    • Core courses for the major are Neurobiology (Bio 475) and Physiological Psychology (Psy 403). Performance of Neuroscience majors in these courses will be compared relative to the baseline of non-neuroscience majors completing the same courses.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty surveys will be reviewed by the co-directors and the curriculum committee
    • Performance will be evaluated by faculty teaching the core courses

    2. Students will be able to display effective written, oral, and quantitative skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will demonstrate their proficiency through assignments and presentations in the core upper division courses for the major(Neurobiology and Physiological Psychology), as well as in cluster options in upper division Biology and Psychology courses. Instructors of 400-level courses in the major will be surveyed to evaluate student proficiency.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty surveys will be reviewed by the co-directors and the curriculum committee

    3. Students will be able to demonstrate research and applied skills.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will participate in supervised research experience in a faculty lab. These directed learning experiences will involve close interaction with supervisors. Faculty surveys will be used to evaluate students' knowledge and competence in research methods.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty surveys will be reviewed by the co-directors and the curriculum committee.

  • Psychology: Behavioral Analysis (M.A.)

    Mission Statement

    We seek to train Master's level Behavior Analysts who have a grounding in research and scholarly activities, can develop and utilize scientific knowledge, are skilled in using their critical thinking and analytic tools in problem formulation and solution generation, and have a repertoire of professional competencies including research, teaching, and applied skills as outlined by the Behavior Analysis Certification Board.

    The program emphasizes creative research and applications of  behavioral principles to a broad range of applied problems. The program's faculty and students , make significant contributions in the areas of research methodology, treatment development, outcomes research, program development, program evaluation, training, supervision, technology transfer, basic behavioral research, and philosophy of science. The program values these behaviors, regardless of the setting in which they occur.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the theoretical, basic and applied areas of Behavior Analysis and research that form the foundation of Behavioral Psychology as it relates to behavior acquisition and change as outlined by the Behavior Analysis Certification Board.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Completion of core research methods course, core theoretical, basic and applied courses, practicum, and ethics course
    • Successful proposal and defense of a Master's Thesis
    Assessment Method
    • Successful completion of coursework at level prescribed by graduate school as assessed by evaluation of exam and classroom performance. Student competency also evaluated by the Behavior analysis training committee (BATC) on an annual basis with feedback to student by advisor
    • Written review by all faculty after input of BATC via the programs annual evaluation system which evaluates academic progress, research, professional activities, and applied work goals on a yearly basis

    2. Students will be able to skillfully and ethically apply current scientific principles of behavior change or the development of new behavior change strategies.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Knowledge of ethical standards of the field
    • Participation in treatment development and other organizational settings
    • Oral presentations
    • Students will demonstrate knowledge of and sensitivity to individual and cultural diversity
    Assessment Method
    • Successful completion of ethics course and program core course requirements. Attendance and supervision by core faculty in clinical or organizational practicum course series. Supervisors' review of proper outcome assessment and intervention procedures
    • Performance evaluation by supervisor regarding students' performance in practicum courses.
    • Evaluated by number of applied presentations in case conferences, national or regional conferences, and workshops. Performance in supervision evaluated by faculty supervisor and reported to BATC with feedback to student
    • Coursework in organizational and clinical interventions with diverse populations of organizational leaders, managers, adults and children, (including gender, ethnicity and physical disabilities); demonstration of knowledge of these issues in clinical, educational, and other organizational settings as evaluated by faculty site supervisors

    3. Students will be able to develop and demonstrate an understanding of the principles and practice of ethical scientific research.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Oral presentation of research
    • Knowledge of research ethics
    • Knowledge of research design
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty observation (and feedback) of presentation at scientific conferences
    • Successful completion of research methodology course as evaluated by classroom examinations and performance; successful completion of IRB mandated ethics course as well as our own separate ethics course
    • Successful completion of program methodology requirements as evaluated by classroom examinations and performance
    • Successful submission, approval and completion of an IRB protocol

    4. Students will be able to establish independence and demonstrate capacity for scientific creativity.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Successful thesis proposal
    • Career employment
    • Successful completion of Masters research project
    • Successful thesis defense
    • Written presentation
    Assessment Method
    • Evaluation by examining committee
    • Alumni survey of satisfaction with employment for 3 years following graduation
    • Evaluation by committee
    • Evaluation by examining committee
    • Evaluation by peer review and/or BATC of manuscripts/ grants submitted for publication
  • Psychology: Behavioral Analysis Ph.D.

    Mission Statement

    We seek to train doctoral level Behavior Analysts who have a thorough grounding in research and scholarly activities, can develop and utilize scientific knowledge, are skilled in using their critical thinking and analytic tools in problem formulation and solution generation, and have a thoroughly developed repertoire of professional competencies, including research, teaching, and applied skills.

    The program emphasizes creative research and applications of psychological principles to a broad range of applied problems. The program's faculty and students , make significant contributions in the areas of research methodology, treatment development, outcomes research, program development, program evaluation, training, supervision, technology transfer, basic behavioral research, and philosophy of science. The program values these behaviors, regardless of the setting in which they occur.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the theoretical, basic and applied areas of Behavior Analysis and research that form the foundation of Behavioral Psychology as it relates to behavior acquisition and change.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Attendance and active participation in weekly research meetings
    • Completion of core research methods courses, statistics sequence, core Theoretical, basic and applied courses, and elective courses
    • Comprehensive knowledge is demonstrated in one or the other of the following outcomes: a) one doctoral paper; or b) one doctoral paper or one grant proposal.
    Assessment Method
    • Behavior Analysis Training Committee (BATC) yearly review of student academic progress with feedback to student provided by Advisor and Director
    • Successful completion of coursework at level prescribed by graduate school as assessed by evaluation of exam and classroom performance. Student competency measures of academic milestones, scholarly production, and professional development as indicated in annual student evaluation by the BATC with feedback to student
    • A 5 member faculty committee approves the peer reviewed publications and grant proposals

    2. Students will be able to skillfully and ethically apply current scientific principles of behavior change or the development of new behavior change strategies.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Knowledge of ethical standards of the field
    • Oral presentations
    • Students will demonstrate knowledge of and sensitivity to individual and cultural diversity
    Assessment Method
    • Successful completion of ethics course and program core course requirements. Attendance and supervision by core faculty in clinical or organizational practicum course series. Supervisors' review of proper outcome assessment and intervention procedures
    • Evaluated by number and quality of publications and presentations in case conferences, national or regional conferences, and workshops.
    • Coursework in clinical assessment and intervention with adults and children, diversity (including gender, ethnicity and physical disabilities); demonstration of knowledge of these issues in clinical, educational, and other organizational settings as evaluated by faculty site supervisors

    3. Students will be able to develop and demonstrate an understanding of the principles and practice of ethical scientific research.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Knowledge of research ethics
    • Knowledge of research design and statistics
    Assessment Method
    • Successful completion of research methodology courses as evaluated by classroom examinations and performance; successful completion of IRB mandated ethics course as well as our own separate ethics course
    • Successful completion of program methodology and statistic requirements as evaluated by classroom examinations and performance
    • Successful submission, approval and completion of an IRB protocol
    • Graded evaluation of students' performance in four consecutive semesters of practicum course.

    4. Students will be able to establish independence and demonstrate capacity for scientific creativity.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Successful dissertation proposal
    • Career employment
    • Successful completion of Masters or pre-doctoral research project
    • Successful dissertation defense
    Assessment Method
    • Evaluation by examining committee
    • Alumni survey of satisfaction with employment for 3 years following graduation
    • Evaluation by committee
    • Evaluation by examining committee
  • Psychology: Clinical Ph.D.

    Mission Statement

    Goals: The Clinical Psychology Program at UNR is accredited by the American Psychological Association and is a charter member of the Academy of Clinical Science. We seek to train doctoral level clinical scientists who have a thorough grounding in research and scholarly activities, can develop and utilize scientific knowledge, are skilled in using their critical thinking and analytic tools in problem formulation and solution generation, and have a thoroughly developed repertoire of professional competencies, including applied skills.

    Objectives: The program emphasizes creative research and applications of psychological principles to a broad range of applied problems. The program's objectives are that scholars, faculty and students alike, make significant contributions in the areas of research methodology, treatment development, outcomes research, program development, program evaluation and quality improvement, training, supervision, technology transfer, basic behavioral research, and philosophy of science. The program values these behaviors, regardless of the setting in which they occur.

    Competencies: Competencies evolve as new the field moves into new domains. Some competencies are universal and include:

    • Accountability to be knowledgeable about the field and its functions in knowledge generation, education, service delivery, and healthcare regardless of location
    • Scientific knowledge and methodology in research, evaluation and healthcare
    • Professional values and attitudes, Individual and cultural diversity
    • Legal and ethical standards in practice, research and policy creation and implementation
    • Assessment including individuals, self, organizations and the context in which these assessments are made
    • Interpersonal skills and communication
    • Evidence based practice
    • Psychological principles of behavior changes
    • Consultation
    • Supervision
    • Systems evaluation and collaboration, quality improvement
    • Strategies for integrating knowledge and practice
    • Critical thinking.

    These competencies do not comprise a complete list. As technology evolves and the field articulates with other areas of our culture and society and its institutions, new competencies should and will emerge. Contacting the APA Commission on Accreditation In accordance with the guidelines from the APA Commission on Accreditation, we want students to know that they may contact the committee at the Education Directorate, American Psychological Association, 750 First St. NE, Washington DC, 20002-4242, phone (202) 336-5979, http://www.apa.org/ed/accreditation

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the basic and applied science and research that form the foundation of psychology as it relates to behavior acquisition and change.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Completion of a didactic research and statistics sequence that incorporates issues in the philosophy of science, research design and methods, and statistical theory and application relevant to empirical research and theory in clinical psychology
    • Attendance and active participation in weekly research meetings
    • Completion of three comprehensive examinations to facilitate development of scholarly interests and broaden students' areas of knowledge and expertise
    Assessment Method
    • Successful completion of coursework at level prescribed by graduate school as assessed by evaluation of exam and classroom performance. Student competency also evaluated by the clinical training committee (CTC) on an annual basis with feedback to student by advisor
    • CTC yearly review of student academic progress with feedback to student provided by advisor
    • Two faculty committee grade each comprehensive examination; passing grade on each comprehensive examination required.

    2. Students will be able to skillfully and ethically apply current scientific principles of behavior change or the development of new behavior change strategies.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Knowledge of ethical standards of the field
    • Participation in treatment development settings
    • Competence in applied clinical settings
    • Oral presentations
    • Students will demonstrate knowledge of and sensitivity to individual and cultural diversity
    Assessment Method
    • Successful completion of ethics course and program clinical course requirements. Attendance and supervision by core faculty in clinical practicum course series. Supervisors' review of proper outcome assessment procedures.
    • Performance evaluation by supervisor on grant or other development related activities with feedback provided by advisor after consultation with CTC
    • Written review by faculty advisor after input of CTC. Written evaluation by program approved externship and internship site directors
    • Evaluated by number of applied presentations in case conferences, national or regional conferences, and workshops. Performance in supervision evaluated by faculty supervisor and reported to CTC with feedback to student.
    • Coursework in clinical interventions with adults and children, diversity (including gender, ethnicity and physical disabilities); demonstration of knowledge of these issues in clinical settings as evaluated by clinical supervisors

    3. Students will be able to develop and demonstrate an understanding of the principles and practice of ethical scientific research.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Oral presentation of research
    • Knowledge of research ethics
    • Knowledge of research design and statistics
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty evaluation of presentation at program's annual research festival; presentations at scientific conferences
    • Successful completion of research methodology courses as evaluated by classroom examinations and performance; successful completion of IRB mandated ethics course
    • Successful completion of program methodology and statistic requirements as evaluated by classroom examinations and performance

    4. Students will be able to establish independence and demonstrate capacity for scientific creativity.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Successful dissertation proposal
    • Career employment
    • Successful completion of Masters or predoctoral research project
    • Successful dissertation defense
    • Written presentation
    Assessment Method
    • Evaluation by examining committee
    • Alumni survey of satisfaction with employment for 3 years following graduation
    • Evaluation by committee
    • Evaluation by examining committee
    • Evaluation by peer review and/or CTC of manuscripts submitted for publication
  • Psychology: Cognitive and Brain Sciences Ph.D.

    Mission Statement

    Experimental psychology is a basic component of any academic program in psychology. The Experimental Program is committed to quality training of students at the graduate and undergraduate levels and the production of high quality research. It is our goal to offer courses and training in the specific areas represented by our faculty research. We strive to train our students to become researchers and/or teachers in experimental psychology. Since our faculty members are expected to maintain active research laboratories, we provide a fertile environment for graduate and undergraduate students to participate and learn about the research process. It is our purpose to provide masters and doctoral graduate students with extensive background in several basic areas of research, to train them so that they can plan and execute original research in the field and expose them, 'in depth' to a concentrated area of research. These actions are intended to prepare masters graduates for advanced study and turn doctoral graduates into viable candidates for academic positions and successful applicants for external funding.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to demonstrate a thorough knowledge of basic theory and methods that forms the foundation of experimental psychology.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will complete written comprehensive exams in areas chosen by each of the experimental faculty.
    Assessment Method
    • Each faculty member will evaluate and submit an assessment reflecting each student's performance on the comprehensive exams.

    2. Students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of ethical treatment of human and/or animal subjects in experimental psychology.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • All students will earn certification via an online human subjects (IRB) ethics course.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty will monitor completion of IRB ethics training.

    3. Students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of the design, methods and procedures for experimental psychology.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will prepare and submit a thesis proposal.
    • Students will defend their Master's thesis.
    Assessment Method
    • Master's thesis proposals will be evaluated by each student's committee.
    • Student's defense of final Master's thesis will be evaluated by student's master committee.

    4. Students will be able to demonstrate skills and knowledge needed to independently recognize meaningful lines of inquiry, and to independently design and conduct experimentation in Psychology

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will submit a dissertations proposal.
    • Students will submit and defend their dissertation.
    Assessment Method
    • Students' committees will evaluate and approval of PhD dissertation proposal.
    • Student's dissertations and defense will be assessed by student's committee to consider acceptance of final PhD dissertation.

    5. Students will be able to demonstrate the skills and ethics needed to effectively teach courses in psychology to undergraduate level students.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will complete Teaching Assistant and/or Course Instructor assignments within the Psychology department.
    Assessment Method
    • Evaluated by students using student evaluation forms submitted each semester. Performance also evaluated by the instructor of the course (if not the graduate student).

    6. Students will be able to demonstrate the skills and knowledge required to successfully compete for external funds and employment.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students will compete for grant funding.
    • Graduates will secure employment in a field related to their area of emphasis.
    Assessment Method
    • Record each student's grant/fellowship awards.
    • Records for post degree employment placement.

    7. Students will be able to demonstrate skills and knowledge needed to present scientific research in a professional and efficient manner.

    Student Performance Indicators
    • Students/Graduates will submit Master's thesis and PhD dissertation abstracts for presentation of talks and/or posters at professional meetings as a first author.
    • Following completion of Master's Thesis and PhD Dissertation students/graduates will submit manuscripts to peer reviewed journals as a first or co-author.
    Assessment Method
    • Faculty will evaluate theses and dissertation presentations, monitor students' acceptance for presentations at professional meetings.
    • Faculty will monitor record of acceptance of manuscripts submitted to peer reviewed journals as a first or co-author.