College of Liberal Arts assessment plans

Anthropology

  • Anthropology B.A.

    Mission Statement

    The Anthropology department's mission is to give Nevada's students the intellectual means to understand and respect the variety in human experiences, and to develop a critical perspective on their own society and on current public policy. Underlying this mission is the goal of contributing to scholarly excellence within the University of Nevada, Reno. The methods used to achieve this mission are:

    • to transmit to students the knowledge, perspectives, and methods of the various branches and sub-fields of anthropology, in forums as diverse as lectures, seminars, discussion sections, and formal academic and career advisement settings;
    • to acquire, synthesize, and disseminate knowledge by means of original research and scholarly activities; and
    • to provide knowledge, guidance, and experience as a service to the university community, the public at large, and fellow members of the profession of anthropology.

    Program Outcomes

    1. BA graduate employment, BA graduate success in applying to higher-level academic programs, and BA graduate satisfaction with the different curricula and degree-granting programs.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • BA degree-completion rates, student transcript analysis, graduation 'exit' Questionnaire, BA graduate employment success

    Assessment Method

    • Database will be collected through exit surveys, faculty contact, and alumni surveys; the data will be examined and analyzed by the assessment subcommittee every December.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will be able to distinguish and explain the central factors in human prehistory and evolution that are responsible for human cultural, physical, and linguistic diversity worldwide.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Student performance on standardized exams and lab experiences in ANTH 101 and 102 plus at least one required upper-level class in physical/biological anthropology, one required upper-level archeology course, one required upper-level linguistics course, and one required upper-level course in cultural anthropology.

    Assessment Method

      2. Students will be able to participate in and are able to evaluate the assumptions, purposes, methods, and results of anthropological research and scholarship.

      Student Performance Indicators

      • Students critically examine anthropological research and scholarship in their coursework (e.g., summer field schools, research methods courses, independent research courses).
      • Students work as researchers on contracts and grants, internships, McNair Program, etc.

      Assessment Method

        3 Students willbe able todemonstrate knowledge of the four subfields of Anthropology and their relevance to the discipline as a whole.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Students learn about methods and theories in the four subfields by taking lower division and upper division courses in each subfield. Students understand relevance of each subfield to Anthropology as whole, and to understanding human life in a changing world.

        Assessment Method

        • Assessment committee develops a comprehensive question to be administered to all graduating senior majors in a given academic year. Students in 400 level classes will respond anonymously to question via short essay answer. Results will be analyzed by assessment committee to determine how many students are partially or fully meeting expectations.

        4. Students will be able to apply the methods of anthropological research and scholarship.

        5. Students will be able to evaluate the connections between the theoretical foundations and the application of anthropological research and scholarship.

      • Anthropology M.A.

        Mission Statement

        The Mission of the Anthropology Masters Program is to provide students who have a Bachelors degree in Anthropology (or closely related field) with:

        • (a) the skills and abilities to understand the entire range of Anthropological theories and methods,
        • (b) the intellectual capacity to carry out original research, and
        • (c) the maturity of thinking needed to analyze and interpret specific examples of variety in human society. Underlying this mission is the goal of contributing to scholarly excellence within the University of Nevada, Reno.

        The methods used to achieve this mission are:

        1. to transmit to students the knowledge, perspectives, and methods of the various branches and sub-fields of anthropology, in forums as diverse as lectures, seminars, discussion sections, and formal academic and career advisement settings;
        2. to acquire, synthesize, and disseminate knowledge by means of original research and scholarly activities; and
        3. to provide knowledge, guidance, and experience as a service to the university community, the public at large, and fellow members of the profession of anthropology.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Students will be prepared for professional employment in their specialty; or alternatively students should be prepared to apply successfully to Doctoral programs at any university in the USA.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Student success rate finding professional employment, as reported by students; or alternatively student success rate applying to Ph.D. programs anywhere in the USA, as reported by students

        Assessment Method

        • 100% sample examined every year by assessment committee -- students who fail to gain employment or acceptance into doctoral programs will be contacted to discuss the reasons

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to discuss the concepts that allow the intellectual integration of four sub-fields together into anthropology; and each sub-field's major contributions to the scientific and humanistic study of our own species.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Student performance in core seminars is evaluated by individual faculty instructors; also thesis proposals are discussed and evaluated before faculty committee members; and comprehensive exams are graded by the entire faculty. A thesis defense is evaluated by all faculty and other students. In core seminars, each student is evaluated on quality and quantity of class participation, on quality of term papers, on the substance and presentation of frequent short papers throughout the semester, and on assigned class presentation(s).

        Assessment Method

        • Individual faculty grade each student's performance in core seminars. All Faculty members meet yearly or more often to evaluate each student's overall progress; faculty committee members also meet as often as possible to review student programs of study and thesis proposals. Each student's thesis defence is a public forum for evaluating the student's progress.

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate skills and experience in original research.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Students develop and implement their own thesis research plans.
        • Students complete course work in research methods.

        Assessment Method

        • The student's faculty mentor and Graduate Advisory Committee will assess the plan and its implementation.
        • Department assesses aggregate scores in the course.
      • Anthropology PhD.

        Mission Statement

        The Mission of the Anthropology department's Doctorate program is to create independent, original thinkers who can design and carry out complex research in specific Anthropological subfields, communicate the results of that research clearly, and make significant advances in the scientific study of humanity. Underlying this mission is the goal of contributing to scholarly excellence within the University of Nevada, Reno.

        The methods used to achieve this mission are:

        1. to transmit to students the knowledge, perspectives, and methods of the various branches and sub-fields of anthropology, in forums as diverse as lectures, seminars, discussion sections, and formal academic and career advisement settings;
        2. to acquire, synthesize, and disseminate knowledge by means of original research and scholarly activities; and
        3. to provide knowledge, guidance, and experience as a service to the university community, the public at large, and fellow members of the profession of anthropology.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Students should be prepared to find employment in a career that makes use of "anthro-thinking."

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Job-seeking success in anthropological career

        Assessment Method

        • We keep tabs on student success because students almost always must ask for letters of recommendation from faculty to get the jobs.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to read and summarize scholarly articles in anthropology books or journals, to evaluate the soundness of arguments and conclusions, and to produce written and oral critiques of them.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • A dissertation prospectus is rigorously examined by a focused faculty committee, after the doctoral comprehensive exams are passed and before the student begins original dissertation research.
        • Doctoral qualifying exams or core seminars require regular oral and written presentations.

        Assessment Method

        • Faculty committee members quiz the student during the prospectus defense, testing knowledge of general and specific theory, methodology, and relevant literature.
        • All students are evaluated by entire faculty once a year, and deficiencies in individual seminars or on examinations are specifically addressed.

        2. Students will be able to teach and explain the concepts that allow the intellectual integration of four sub-fields together into anthropology, and each sub-fields major contributions to the scientific and humanistic study of our own species.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • All doctoral students must teach introductory Anthropology courses; student evaluations are read by the faculty, and faculty may visit classrooms to grade student performance

        Assessment Method

        • Students receiving poor evaluations are either dismissed, re-trained, or closely monitored and guided through improvement

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate mastery of an area of specialization in anthropology by completing a comprehensive exam consisting of essays and an oral defense.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Students successfully complete and defend comprehensive exam

        Assessment Method

        • Student's Graduate Advisory Committee evaluates the comprehensive exam.

        4. Students will be able to demonstrate original research skills and experience that result in professional scholarship and publications.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Publication of articles or reports and presentations at professional conferences.
        • The student will successfully complete and defend a dissertation that makes a significant contribution to anthropological scholarship.

        Assessment Method

        • The student's faculty mentor and Graduate Advisory Committee will assess the publications and presentations.
        • The student's faculty mentor and Graduate Advisory Committee will assess the dissertation and its defense.

      Art

      • Art (B.A., B.A. in Studio and Art History)

        Mission Statement

        The Department of Art through undergraduate courses, professional exhibition presentations, professional public lectures and related contemporary art programming provides students opportunities to: [1] create art in a studio context with both technical and conceptual instruction, [2] an educational experience in art history, theory, and criticism which offer an informed appreciation of the world's artistic heritage and [3] establish a foundation for continued studio and creative practice, formal graduate work, and employment in art related careers.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Studio majors and graduates will be prepared with a strong foundation for post-graduate creative activities ["making" Art], study, advanced scholarly work in Art History and related careers.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Graduate and professional school admissions. Local, regional, and national exhibition participation; catalogs, reviews and publications. Internship/client experiences. Successful job placements.

        Assessment Method

        • Recording the quality of graduate programs into which our BA graduates are accepted [as determined by the Department of Art Faculty.]Recording the quality of professional exhibition activity in which our BA graduates are participating [as determined by the Department of Art Faculty.]Internship coordinator records evaluation of enrolled students based upon work evaluation and diaries submitted by student[s].In addition to Faculty reports of Student Performance Indicators, Chair conducts formal exit interviews with each graduating senior to acquire further anecdotal information.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Studio majors will, through formal Art History and Criticism courses and related programs, be able to demonstrate the historical knowledge, critical perspectives and visual sophistication regarding the development of Art from the past to the present.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Quality art work produced. Timely completion of studio projects. Level of commitment, participation and productivity. Readiness to progress onto next level.

        Assessment Method

        • Faculty evaluation of student's art work as determined via final grade report[s].External visiting professionals evaluation of student's art work as determined by critiques and overview of student galleries [exhibitions].Faculty review of Annual Juried Student Exhibition and other student exhibition venues.

        2. Art History majors will be able to achieve a basic mastery and scholarly competence in the academic endeavors of Art History.

      • Art (B.F.A.)

        Mission Statement

        The department of Art through Bachelor of Fine Art courses, professional exhibition presentations, professional public lectures and related contemporary art programming provides students opportunities to:

        1. create art in a studio context with both technical and conceptual instruction,
        2. gain educational experience in art history, theory, and criticism which offer an informed appreciation of the worlds artistic heritage and
        3. establish a foundation for continued studio and creative practice, formal graduate work, and employment in art related careers.

        Program Outcomes

        1. BFA studio majors and graduates will be prepared with a strong foundation for post-graduate creative practice, study and careers.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Graduate and professional school admissions.
        • Local, regional, and national exhibition participation.
        • Publications, catalogs, and reviews of artwork.
        • Internship experiences.
        • Art-related job placements.

        Assessment Method

        • Recording the quality of graduate programs into which our BFA graduate students are accepted.
        • Recording the quality of professional exhibition activity in which our BFA graduates are participating. Students will report on exhibition activity via senior interviews and questionnaires.
        • Recording the quality of professional publications in which our BFA students are featured. Students will report on publication activity via senior interviews and questionnaires.
        • Recording the quality of enrolled interns. Internship coordinator will evaluate, based on work evaluation and diaries from students, and seek evaluation from Internship Client.
        • Recording the quality of employment in art related careers. Students will report on job placement via senior exit interviews and questionnaires.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Studio majors will, through both studio class instruction and formal art history and theory and criticism courses and related programming, be able to demonstrate the historical knowledge, contemporary perspectives and critical and visual sophistication regarding the evolution of art as well as the contemporary practice of art.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Quality of scholarly written papers, and oral presentations. Students are required to articulate the position of their work within the contemporary art lexicon.

        Assessment Method

        • BFA graduate committee reviews and records written thesis papers and oral defense at the time of the thesis exhibition.

        2. BFA students will be able to achieve a high-level mastery and technical competence in studio practice.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Quality of art work produced. Timely completion of studio work. Level of commitment, participation and productivity. Readiness to progress to the next level.

        Assessment Method

        • BFA committee evaluation of Mid-way Progress and Thesis exhibition. External visiting professionals' evaluation of BFA student art work facilitated by critiques, studio and gallery visits.
      • Art (M.F.A.)

        Mission Statement

        The Master of Fine Arts in Art is a three-year, sixty credit hour, terminal degree in Studio Art. The program offers students comprehensive experience in critical theory, Art Historical knowledge and context, as well as advanced development in areas of studio specialization (i.e. painting, sculpture, photography, etc.) The Department of Art, through graduate courses, professional exhibition presentations, professional public lectures, and related contemporary arts programming provides students the opportunity to: [1] create and present art in a studio context based on advanced technical skills, creative thinking, and critical analysis of one's work. Equal emphasis is placed upon the creation of artwork and its intellectual, conceptual, and social contexts [2] gain expanded knowledge in Art History, theory, and criticism which offers an informed appreciate of the world's artistic heritage as well as provide contextualization for the student's own creative practice [3] establish the underpinnings and momentum for continued individual professional careers in studio/creative practice and [4] establish the foundation to pursue a career in teaching at the high school/community college/university level, and/or employment in a wide range of art related careers such as arts administration, not-for-profit/city/state arts agencies, museums, and galleries.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to apply in-depth knowledge and competence in one or more areas of specialization (i.e. sculpture, painting, photography).

        Student Performance Indicators

        • ART 642 Intermedia Studio encourages the development of working methodologies utilizing interdisciplinary strategies in studio production. The primary activity of this class will be ongoing group critiques of student projects to encourage and develop critical and communication skills that will sustain practice and encourage further innovation and experimentation. This course is required for six credit hours over the span of the degree program.
        • Students are required to maintain engagement throughout each semester with all Thesis Committee members in regards to the development and critical analysis of artworks.
        • The student demonstrates proficiency in the utilization of a range of processes that encompass each student's chosen area(s) of specialization. Students are expected to exhibit sensitivity to, and creativity with chosen medium(s), as well as present demonstrable technical skills, formal and conceptual application, and foundation principles applicable to the area of specialization.
        • ART 710-Graduate Studio Practice involves in-depth studio engagement and critical analysis on an individual study basis with a single faculty each semester. ART 710 is required for a total of 24 credit hours over the span of the degree program.

        Assessment Method

        • The Thesis solo exhibition is presented in the final semester of the third year of study. The production and professional presentation of artworks in a gallery setting is accompanied by the written thesis and requires a formal oral defense. The thesis exhibition must present demonstrable technical skills, formal and conceptual awareness, and exemplary knowledge of the principles and theory that encompass the chosen area of concentration. The scope of the exhibition and caliber of artwork is expected to be comparable to the work of professionals in the field.
        • The overall thesis requirements are evaluated by the full Thesis Committee and a final grade is assigned for ART 777 â€" Thesis Exhibition.
        • Faculty members grade student performance in individual course work.
        • The Graduate Director consults with the Thesis Committee Chair and assesses student progress in the program at the conclusion of each semester.
        • Timely production and presentation of completed, high quality artworks that display new insights and working methods are required in order to facilitate on-going instruction, assessment, and evaluation. Studio knowledge and competency are assessed through regularly scheduled coursework (listed above), visiting artist and faculty studio visits and critique sessions, Mid-Way Advancement to Candidacy Exhibition (at 30 credit hours), and Thesis Exhibition (presented at the conclusion of the third year.)
        • The Mid-Way Advancement to Candidacy solo exhibition is presented in a gallery setting during the third semester as the student approaches thirty-credit hours. Advancement involves critical evaluation and approval of the full Thesis Committee. The Mid-Way Advancement to Candidacy exhibition is used to predict the student's readiness to develop and defend a final thesis.

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate a critical awareness of one's own works within the larger context of Art History, contemporary art, theory, and practices.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • ART 737-Theory and Criticism is a discussion-based seminar that provides an in-depth investigation into critical theory and art criticism in relationship to the history of modern and contemporary art from c. 1850 to the present. The course is devoted to studying scholarly journals; methodologies used to analyze cultural production; history, culture and the current state of art criticism; major topics of contemporary discourse including key philosophers, theorists, historians, critics, and artists; and writing. This course is required for three to six credits over the span of the degree program.
        • ART 698 â€" Seminar in the Visual Arts focuses on reading, discussion and writing related to the position of art and artists in contemporary and historical contexts. The course encourages MFA candidates to further situate themselves in regard to critical theory, cultural perspectives and contemporary practice. This course is required for six credit hours over the span of the degree program.
        • ART 747 â€" Directed Readings is an advanced individual study tutorial course with scheduled one-on-one faculty/student interactions. The readings assigned in this course will provide historical and philosophical context for the student's artwork, and lay the foundation for the written thesis. This course will direct individual students to particularized writings by artists, critics, and theorists as it relates to the student's specific art making interests, focus, and practice. This course is required for three to six credits over the span of the degree program.
        • Students must demonstrate an exemplary ability to analyze, interpret and contextualize a broad range of contemporary and historical art practices. Students will (1) be well versed in critical theory and able to apply knowledge of current trends in context with their own work (2) possess a broad understanding of Art History and ability to apply Art Historical context to their own work and (3) have the ability to express their knowledge both verbally and in writing. The courses listed below involve a broad range of graduate-level reading, writing, discussion and presentation. These courses are required for a total of 12 to 18 credit hours over the span of the degree program.

        Assessment Method

        • The student's application of knowledge is evaluated in studio visits and critique sessions that emphasize verbal articulation.
        • The Mid-Way Advancement to Candidacy exhibition presentation and subsequent Thesis Committee evaluation require a written artist statement in addition to verbal articulation during mandatory critique.
        • The written thesis, oral defense, and thesis exhibition are expected to present an accomplished assimilation of the physical manifestation of artwork and its intellectual, conceptual, and social contexts. The thesis exhibition and written thesis should contribute in a significant way to the area of inquiry which the student has identified as his or her focus.
        • The overall thesis requirements are evaluated by the full Thesis Committee and a final grade is assigned for ART 777 â€" Thesis Exhibition.
        • Faculty members grade student performance in individual course work.
        • Assessment and valuation of the student's ability to analyze, synthesize, and express knowledge of Art History, contemporary art, theory, and practices occurs in regularly scheduled required course work (listed above), visiting artist and faculty studio visits and critique sessions, Mid-Way Advancement to Candidacy Exhibition (at 30 credit hours), and Thesis Exhibition (presented at the conclusion of the third year.)

        3. Students will be able to develop and assemble professional materials, documentation and artist portfolio for career development.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Students produce highly organized, well written, and well crafted professional materials including Curriculum Vitae, written artist biography, general artist statement, exhibition statement (relating to a specific body of artwork), and professional photographic documentation of visual artworks. Quality professional materials are required in applications for exhibition, scholarships, grants, artist residency programs, and/or art career employment.

        Assessment Method

        • The student demonstrates an understanding of the principles and elements of professional representation, including writing, visual documentation, and portfolio materials in the following: (1) The Department of Art offers a competitive MFA scholarship application every spring. The scholarship application process, paired with a workshop, provides an opportunity for the student to learn how to put together professional quality, competitive application materials. Students must present a scholarship application that organizes their academic/research/creative activity materials in such a way that can be used for other purposes such as outside grants, artist residency programs and college-level teaching applications. Scholarship awards are merit-based and are evaluated by a committee made up of Department of Art faculty and one senior/third-year MFA graduate student representative. (2) Professional materials (documentation of artwork, written artist biography, general artist statement and exhibition statement) for exhibition announcements and press releases are required for the Mid-Way Advancement to Candidacy and Thesis exhibitions. These materials are assessed and approved by the Thesis Committee, and when appropriate, the Director of University Galleries prior to dissemination. (3) Exhibition statements are generally presented with the artwork at the gallery during exhibition. (4) The Thesis exhibition gallery presentation requires a professional, public artist lecture. The student must prepare and present an organized, well produced visual lecture that includes visual documentation of their artworks and verbal articulation intended to convey critical information, history, background, and theories related to their personal research/creative practice. The lecture is intended to be educational to the audience and provides the student experience in civic engagement.

      Center for Basque Studies

      • Basque Studies Tutorial (Ph.D.)

        Mission Statement

        The mission of the Center for Basque Studies (hereafter CBS) is both to preserve existing knowledge about the Basque people and to facilitate and encourage the further study and investigation of Basque topics by promoting scholarship and research in the field of Basque Studies. In order to achieve this goal, CBS faculty participates in scholarly and research activities in the various fields of Basque Studies, including but not limited to Anthropology and Culture, History, Language and Literature, and Political Science, as well as Genocide studies, Terrorism, Diaspora and Migration Studies, Gender Studies and, Art. As an interdisciplinary field, Basque Studies requires scholars to be conversant with Basque-related material and research across the disciplines. CBS faculty conduct research in their areas of specialization and in related areas that fall within the purview of Basque studies as a whole. In addition, while our faculty are focused on Basque Studies, they are also trained in specific disciplines and make contributions in those various academic fields, through research, teaching, and community outreach, even when such contributions are not Basque-related. The CBS facilitates the research of Basque Scholars worldwide through access to our staff and by facilitating access to the Basque Library collection. The CBS facilitates interest in Basque scholarship in the following ways: by offering classes at UNR and other universities in the United States and in Europe; through study abroad, specifically under UNR's University Studies Abroad Consortium; by running a listserve for Basque scholars; by maintaining a website and presence on the internet; by offering a Basque minor; and by providing a tutorial Ph.D. The CBS provides knowledge, experience, and advice regarding the Basque language and culture to the University and the community, the region, the country, and the world. The CBS responds to requests for information from organizations, institutions and individuals; publishes and distributes materials including but not limited to a newsletter, articles, and monographs; edits a Basque Book Series for the University of Nevada; provides consultation, when appropriate, to museums, documentary filmmakers, other publishers, etc.; and contributes to the atmosphere of scholarly excellence within the University.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Students will exhibit progress in the Ph.D. tutorial program between the first and second semester following enrollment.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Each student, in cooperation with their faculty mentor, will develop and submit a formal program of study.
        • Each student will form a graduate committee.

        Assessment Method

        • The CBS director and faculty mentor will approve the student's graduate committee.
        • The CBS director, the student's faculty mentor and the graduate committee will assess (Approve/Disapprove) the program of study.

        2. Communication between students and the CBS will be facilitated by regular tutorials between students and their faculty mentors.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Following regular tutorial meetings with the student, the faculty mentor will write a report on the student's progress at the end of every semester and, in conjunction with the student, set objectives for the next and subsequent semesters.

        Assessment Method

        • Reports will be reviewed each semester by the student, the director of the CBS, the faculty mentor and the director of graduate studies to assess the student's progress (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory), based upon objectives agreed by the student and mentor. Reports will flag potential and existing academic, personal or financial issues.

        3. Each student will complete the comprehensive exam composed by the student's graduate committee in order to be admitted to Ph.D. candidacy.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Student will schedule and complete the comprehensive exam.

        Assessment Method

        • The student's graduate committee will assess (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) the comprehensive exam.

        4. Each candidate for the Tutorial Ph.D. must obtain approval of a dissertation prospectus and complete a dissertation which makes a significant scholarly contribution to knowledge.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Each candidate will write a dissertation on the topic approved by the faculty mentor and the student's graduate committee. The student will regularly submit draft chapters to his/her graduate committee for critical comment.

        Assessment Method

        • The faculty mentor and the student's graduate committee will assess (Approve/Disapprove) the student's dissertation.

        5. Each student will defend his/her dissertation.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Each student will make an oral defense of the written dissertation.

        Assessment Method

        • The graduate committee will assess (Approve/Disapprove) the oral defense in order to complete the Doctoral Degree Notice of Completion.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1.  Students will be able to demonstrate a minimum level of comprehension skills in the Basque language (Euskara) before graduation.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Student will complete a proficiency exam in the Basque language before the comprehensive examination has been scheduled.

        Assessment Method

        • The CBS faculty member responsible for teaching Basque language courses at UNR will administer a proficiency exam to all Ph.D. candidates and assess (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) the student's responses.

      Communication Studies

      • Communication Studies B.A.

        Mission Statement

        Communication Studies is a discipline that addresses communication processes at work in virtually all human activities. The UNR program focuses on these processes as they occur in: a) public advocacy and civic engagement, and b) relational dynamics.
        A balance of contemporary social science and critical-cultural perspectives on human communication guide our teaching and research efforts. Accordingly, we emphasize a breadth of research methodologies. Our mission embraces the importance of contributing new knowledge while maintaining high standards of teaching and advising. We see research,teaching, and professional service activities as mutually reinforcing.
        We view the refinement of communication skills as central to achieving civility and effectiveness in personal and professional activities. The power of communication inspires our commitment to students and the greater Nevada community.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the communication studies discipline including its theories, concepts, and how the study of communication is applied to academic and non-academic settings.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Evaluation and application of communication theories to specific communication events.
        • Mastery of theories specific to a specialized track of study (relational or public advocacy).

        Assessment Method

        • Exams or research/problem-solving projects.
        • Research projects in upper division courses

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate competency in systematic inquiry and research methods including asking questions, finding appropriate resources and/or conducting independent data gathering and analysis, while understanding the limits of research methodologies.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Critical thinking and analytic skills as part of the systematic inquiry process.
        • Ability to use research resources (library, academic databases, Internet, etc.).
        • Ability to synthesize information from a variety of sources and to evaluate that information including the credibility of sources, research methods, perspective of researcher(s), and communicative context.
        • Understanding of multiple research traditions in the discipline of communication studies.

        Assessment Method

        • Assignments in COM 212 that include journal article abstracts and evaluating research from across the discipline.
        • Gathering, evaluating, and utilizing research specific to speeches, research proposals, or literature reviews.

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate competency and confidence in oral message development and delivery including determining and focusing message purpose, organizing appropriate information, and effectively presenting a message appropriate to specific audiences and contexts.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Understanding of different speech types (impromptu, extemporaneous, manuscript, memorized, group), interactional goals (inform, persuade, entertain, special occasions), and audiences (including demographics, psychographics and orientation to topic).
        • Organization and presentation of content of speech using clear thesis, organizational patterns, and supporting materials.
        • The ability to use language skills in delivery including vocal variety, articulation, language choice, and nonverbals.
        • The ability to use technology and visual/presentation aids appropriate to presentational contexts.

        Assessment Method

        • Delivering speeches using different methods and contexts in speech based courses.

        4. Students will be able to demonstrate competency and confidence in written message development including adapting message to specific contexts, mediums, and audiences.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • The ability to choose appropriate written format(s) and message content based on communication goals, audience needs, and context.
        • The ability to format academic manuscripts using APA style.
        • The ability to construct and edit written work using appropriate academic writing style, grammar, and punctuation.
        • The ability to write and sustain coherent argument supported by clear, accurate evidence.

        Assessment Method

        • Writing in a variety of contexts for different courses (business proposals, academic research papers, etc.)
        • Writing assignments in COM 212 to learn APA citation style specifically.
        • Learned in writing assignments specific to COM 212 and enforced in other courses.
        • Research papers or literature review writing.

        5. Students will be able to demonstrate competency in communication in relational settings (interpersonal, intercultural, group, and organizational environments).

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Communication skills including listening, conversational management, appropriate expression, assertiveness, and appreciation of diverse communication styles.
        • Ability to manage difficult conversations competently, including those that require the management of multiple goals, such as negotiation, misunderstandings, and conflict resolution.
        • Ability to successfully work on collaborative projects with others, understand different methods for building consensus and group cohesion, and understand the role of communication in building relationships within a variety of social systems.
        • Ability to adapt across a variety of contexts, such as interpersonal, intercultural, small group, organizational, family, and mediated settings.

        Assessment Method

        6. Students will be able to demonstrate competency in communication for public advocacy contexts.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Ability to design, implement, and evaluate messages for public advocacy in a variety of contexts (i.e. political, social movement, or business campaigns), for a variety of audiences, and through a variety of mediated channels.
        • Ability to employ and/or evaluate persuasive message strategies including reasoned argument, visual imagery, strategic language (i.e. narrative, framing, etc.), or forms of dissent.
        • Understanding public advocacy contexts including how communication enables and excludes participation in the public sphere; creates social change; constitutes subjectivities; and drives dominant social institutions (i.e. legal, government, education systems).

        Assessment Method

        • Analyzing messages utilizing qualitative or rhetorical criticism methods to produce research papers.
        • Creating persuasive messages for public advocacy campaigns in internship or service learning projects.
        • Applying or identifying public advocacy and/or rhetorical theories in written assignments and/or tests.

        7. Students will be able to demonstrate competency in being an ethical communicator in and for our increasingly diverse and globalized world.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Demonstrate self-awareness of one's own language choices and behaviors as a means to produce messages without intention to manipulate or mislead audiences/receivers.
        • Recognize the ways communication influences subjectivities, creates systems of power and oppression, and can challenge dominant meaning systems.
        • Recognize and appreciate diversity of language and cultures including the ability to adapt communication to specific contexts (international, intercultural, between genders, etc.).
        • Ability to recognize, appreciate, and honor multiple communication preferences and identify how social categories such as gender, ethnicity, race, sexuality, (dis)ability, class, and other underrepresented groups influence communicative practice.

        Assessment Method

      Criminal Justice

      • Criminal Justice B.A.

        Mission Statement

        The Department of Criminal Justice is committed to the creation of philosopher/practitioners: individuals capable of envisioning crime and justice in contexts that engage perspectives from philosophy through science. The educational atmosphere of the department is intended to develop and enhance individual student ability to fashion meaningful personal and program responses to the complex demands placed on criminal justice actors and organizations by constitutional, democratic pluralism. A constant theme of teaching and learning in the department is that 'fixes' should never cause more harm than the condition being addressed. Toward the above, and appreciating that the creation, enforcement, adjudication and correctional aspects of law are inherently moral activities, the department stresses ethical development underpinned by exceptionally strong critical thinking and writing skills.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to exhibit a sound understanding of the myths of the criminal justice system and demonstrate meaningful knowledge of issues and dilemmas of problem-solving in a pluralistic society.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Student papers and presentations from various CRJ courses.
        • Students will complete oral and written responses/group work in upper-division CRJ courses.
        • Students will complete the summative Senior Seminar CRJ 450 or Colloquium CRJ 451.
        • Students will complete the senior exit interview.

        Assessment Method

        • Faculty will evaluate student papers and presentations using a faculty approved rubric.
        • Faculty will evaluate students' oral and written work using a faculty approved rubric.
        • The program will track students' success rates in these courses
        • Exit interview data will be reviewed by CJ Assessment Committee.

        2. Students will be able to exhibit quantitative and qualitative social science skills that will allow them to meaningfully analyze empirically developed data and engage in program assessment.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Students will make presentations in Senior Seminar.
        • Students will complete an exit interview and university-wide alumni survey.
        • Students read and critique research articles.
        • Students will develop a research proposal.
        • Student will develop critiques of various examples of assessment programs.

        Assessment Method

        • Faculty with evaluate presentation using a faculty approved rubric.
        • Exit interview and alumni survey data will be reviewed by CJ Assessment Committee.
        • Faculty will evaluate student critiques using a faculty approved rubric.
        • Faculty will evaluate the soundness of research proposals.
        • Faculty will evaluate students' ability to apply a variety of analytic techniques.

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate sophisticated thinking and writing in critical, programmatic, and evaluative venues and demonstrate the ability to approach knowledge from a variety of epistemological traditions.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Students will complete oral and written responses/group work in upper-division CRJ courses.
        • Students read and critique research articles.
        • Students complete specific papers and essay items in various classes.
        • Students will complete the senior exit interview.

        Assessment Method

        • Faculty will evaluate students' oral and written work using a faculty approved rubric.
        • Faculty will evaluate student critiques using a faculty approved rubric.
        • A sample of papers of program majors will be reviewed by faculty.
        • Exit interview data will be reviewed by CJ Assessment Committee

        4. Students will be able to demonstrate a solid grounding in a variety of ethical systems to enhance their ability to conduct themselves as ethical persons in complex and demanding situations.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Students complete specific papers and essay items in various classes.
        • Students will complete the summative Senior Seminar CRJ 450.
        • Students will complete a senior exit interview and the university-wide Alumni Survey.
        • Students will self-report their understanding of criminal justice ambiguities of an ethical moral nature.
        • Students will provide responses to hypothetical situations involving ethical-moral decisions.

        Assessment Method

        • A sample of papers of program majors will be reviewed by faculty.
        • The program will track students' success rates in this course.
        • Exit interview and alumni survey data will be reviewed by CJ Assessment Committee.
        • Faculty will evaluate student responses to hypothetical situations using a faculty approved rubric.
        • Faculty will evaluate student responses to hypothetical situations using a faculty approved rubric.

        5. Students will be able to conduct constant self-reflection as required to be an effective philosopher/practitioner amidst the American diversity in race, ethnicity, gender and class.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Students will read and analyze materials relating to the treatment of minorities in the criminal justice system.
        • Students will orally explain why disparities and discrimination in the system exist.
        • Students will identify how public policies have shaped the disparate treatment of minority groups.

        Assessment Method

        • Faculty will evaluate students oral and written work using a faculty approved rubric.
        • Faculty will evaluate students oral work based on a faculty approved rubric.
        • Faculty will evaluate student critiques using a faculty approved rubric.
      • Criminal Justice M.A.

        Mission Statement

        The primary mission of the Department of Criminal Justice is three-fold: to educate students about their responsibilities as scholars and practitioners of criminal justice, and as citizens in a pluralistic society; to maintain an academic and working environment where all faculty and staff are encouraged to develop themselves personally and intellectually and where faculty feel free to engage in teaching, research and community service in the spirit of academic and personal freedom; and to build a department that by its example of cooperation, teamwork and dedication to university and community needs, serves as a model for citizen involvement.
        Within the graduate degree program, this mission is expanded to include training in theories and methodologies necessary to critically analyze a problem in a professional field, and exposure to the current research and theories in the field to more accurately predict the outcome of interventions at the social, political, and legal levels. Additionally, the MA in CRJ program requires that students be able to apply these same critical and methodological analyses to these current theories and studies to more completely understand and evaluate the quality of the research and to better understand the flaws inherent in many studies.

        The primary mission of the Department of Criminal Justice:

        1. To educate students about their responsibilities as scholars and practitioners of criminal justice, and as citizens in a pluralistic society;
        2. To maintain an academic environment where all graduate students are encouraged to develop themselves personally and intellectually and where graduate students feel free to engage in teaching, research and community service in the spirit of academic and personal freedom;
        3. To build a graduate student cohort that is an example of cooperation, teamwork and dedication to university and community needs; and
        4. To foster and encourage training in the theories and methodologies necessary to critically analyze a problem in a professional field, and to be exposed to current research and theories in the field of criminal justice, and to have the ability to apply these current theories and studies in order to more completely understand and evaluate the quality of the research and to better understand the flaws inherent in many studies.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Masters students will receive excellent training in criminal justice theories and research methodologies.
        Student Performance Indicators

        • Graduate students are required to take 18 credits of course work in the Core area. This information is focused on both the understanding and the critical evaluation of current and classic research studies.
        • Every M.A. student will write examination responses in the core classes some of which deal with the effects of race, gender, and status on the quality of justice received.
        • Graduate students, through their participation in the Core classes, will be exposed to issues such as Racial Profiling, Victimization, Ethics, and Inequality and Justice Issues. The examination and grading processes in these classes will test their understanding and internalization of this knowledge.

        Assessment Method

        • Thesis students will be evaluated on their knowledge of research, and their critical thinking skills, through the rigorous examination of their respective literature reviews. Non-thesis students will be held to the same standard, but will be assessed through the comprehensive examination process.
        • In the course of teaching these core classes, faculty members will be expected to grade each student's performance in course work, and report to the Graduate Advisor the student's progress and performance.
        • Their performance in classroom discussions and on papers and examinations will be used as an indicator of their understanding of this material.

        2. Students will complete their theses or professional papers and graduate in a "reasonable" time frame.
        Student Performance Indicators

        • All MA students are offered the opportunity to participate in the teaching of a specific class, and are encouraged to teach classes which deal with the topic of their respective theses.
        • All M.A. students are encouraged to take the materials generated by their thesis research, as well as course-based research documents, to local law enforcement and social service agencies in order to improve their understanding of the field and to expose them to the current state of the art in research findings.
        • All M.A. students who choose to write a master's thesis will be required by their committee members to make sure the thesis demonstrates, both through the literature review and the subsequent data analysis, perspectives which consider the impact of social and economic disadvantage on crime.

        Assessment Method

        • The number of classes taught by graduate students over the course of their time in the department, and the topic of the class taught by the individual graduate student.
        • The number of agencies/criminal justice professionals contacted and presented to by the graduate student, as well as the number of agencies which request information from the research.
        • The presence of a broad-based literature review in the thesis, as well as data collection which recognizes the importance of demographic factors in crime causation and social sanctions.

        3. Program graduates will be prepared for subsequent graduate education or criminal justice agency employment.
        Student Performance Indicators

        • Knowledge of criminal justice theories is required of all graduate students. Students who have not had coursework in criminological theory will be required to take at the graduate level the criminological theory course and pass the class with a grade of B or better.
        • Selection of courses in research methodology that have as their goals the training in skills necessary for the production of a quality thesis, as well as success in the criminal justice field.

        Assessment Method

        • Theoretical knowledge and the appropriate application of theory will be evaluated in both a portion of the Comprehensive exam, as well as the literature review of the thesis. Further, the number of students who are required to take the Criminological Theory course, and their respective grades will also be tracked.
        • Students are required to obtain approval from the Graduate Director for their core courses in Research Methodology and Statistics. The graduate director will provide approval based on the content of the class as indicated by the course syllabus and contact with the instructor.

        Student Learning Outcomes

      English

      • English B.A.

        Mission Statement

        The Department of English prepares English majors and minors to read critically, think analytically, research thoughtfully, and write well in a variety of contexts. It also introduces them to major literary movements, current concepts of language and its acquisition, and theories of composition and criticism. Students completing our degree program will have a general command of the discipline and the skills necessary to the discipline. After graduation, they will use these critical skills both within the discipline of English as teachers, editors, writers, and researchers, and in other related professional fields. The English Department has three "foundation" courses (required of all majors and most minors before the 400-level courses). These are:

        • ENG 281: Introduction to Language or
          ENG 282: Introduction to Language and Literary Expression
        • ENG 298: Writing About Literature
        • ENG 303: Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism (prereq. ENG 298)

        These classes prepare students for 400-level course work and allow instructors to address the goals of each course in complementary ways.

        • ENG 281: A more technical introduction to historical and contemporary issues in linguistics, and the systems, dialects, and underlying structures of English and other languages, with attention to the social and political implications of language issues.
        • ENG 282: A more general introduction to many of the same language issues covered in ENG 281, especially as they relate to oral and written English, and English language acquisition by children and speakers of other languages.
        • ENG 298: A rigorous introduction to literary study with special emphasis on developing essays on literary topics. Research methods, literary terminology, and the study of particular questions related to literary genres (fiction, poetry, drama, nonfiction). Designed for English majors and minors, and English-emphasis major/minors in secondary education.

        ENG 303: Builds on its prerequisite, ENG 298, to organize literary analysis with critical theory past and present, including issues of race, class and canon formation. Furthers the work in ENG 298 with detailed attention to writing, research and documentation. A prerequisite for upper-division courses in English.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Once students have successfully completed the foundation courses, the remaining courses in the student's undergraduate program will build on, refine, and expand the outcomes listed below.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Using information available in CAIS, courses being taken by graduating seniors will be identified and a substantial essay assignment written by the student(s) will be provided by faculty teaching these courses.

        Assessment Method

        • Essay assignments gathered from faculty teaching seniors about to graduate will be stripped of identifying marks and evaluated by a subcommittee of the department's Undergraduate Committee.
        • The language committee will be carrying out assessment of 281 this academic year. I am assuming the following: 1) No names will appear on the pretests. Lorena and I will simply mark them for the section number of the course.2) All people on the language committee will look at all the pretests except that Lorena and I will not mark those of our own section.3) Lorena and I will mark each section's pretests first before Dennis and Valerie look at the pretests and add their own comments, all this semester.4) Post-tests that the committee will examine will consist of a random selection of 50% (assuming an enrollment of 30 undergraduates) of each section's (Don's and Lorena's) exams during the semester, not graded and with names of students concealed. (After arranging each exam alphabetically according to student's last name, Lorena and I will select the following random numbered student test from each exam that we give (assuming three exams: if Lorena give more than three exams, I can generate as many random series as needed: 1 2 3 8 10 11 15 16 19 20 21 25 26 28 29 (First exam)1 3 6 7 10 11 12 14 19 20 22 24 25 29 30 (Second exam)1 2 4 6 8 9 10 11 12 15 17 19 21 22 26 (Third exam) 5) The committee will grade these posttests in spring 2014 (in the same manner as the pretest grading) and discuss and report our findings to Bill.6) I am assuming that we do not have to obtain student permission to circulate the students' pretests or posttests among the committee. Their identities will be concealed.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able:

        • To demonstrate the nature, definitions(s), and function of language
        • To recall the history, development, and properties of English
        • To explain grammar and usage
        • To describe how language functions in society to shape our ideas, beliefs, and thinking
        Student Performance Indicators
        • Entry and exit-level examination for ENG 281.
        • Entry and exit examination for ENG 282.
        Assessment Method
        • Entry and exit-level examinations from the 2008 fall semester section of English 281 will be stripped of ID and evaluated by members of the department's Language Committee.
        • Random subset of exams to be read by committee of language faculty.

        2. Students will be able:

        • To recall specific literary genres (e.g., poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction) and historical periods (e.g. Early Modern, Romanticism, Realism)
        • To employ literary terminology appropriate to the study of various genres
        • To write literary analyses and critical arguments based on close reading, using academic citation forms when appropriate
        • To demonstrate the relationships between authors, texts, and readers
        • To utilize electronic and traditional resources for research and literary study
        Student Performance Indicators
        • Instructors teaching English 298: Writing About Literature will administer a single common writing assignment near the end of the semester designed to assess a subset of the above SLOs.
        Assessment Method
        • Collect unmarked copies of assignment from instructor. Department-level committee to evaluate randomly-selected sample, using student performance indicators as rubric.

        3. Students will be able:

        • To develop skills in critical thinking and writing about literature
        • To recall a range of critical theories about literature and the various approaches (e.g., Marxist, feminist, formalist, postcolonial) by which it can be analyzed
        • To apply contemporary theory and criticism to texts
        • To demonstrate the importance of culture, race, gender, and class in literary analysis
        • To relate the concept of canon formation
        Student Performance Indicators
        • Instructors teaching English 303 will collaborate on the design of a single specific writing assignment designed to assess a subset of the above SLOs.
        Assessment Method
        • Collect unmarked copies of assignment from instructors. Department-level committee to evaluate randomly selected sample, using student performance indicators as rubric.

        4. Student Learning Outcomes by Sub-Plan:
        Literature
        Students will be able:

        • To analyze the development of different genres from the medieval period to the present and explain their distinctive features.
        • To write lucid, well-constructed arguments analyzing and interpreting texts.
        • To analyze a literary work in its cultural and historical contexts.
        • To articulate the premises and assumptions of different critical approaches and apply them to literature texts using literary-critical vocabulary effectively.
        • To demonstrate the relevance of linguistic principles and the history of language to the study of literature.


        Writing
        Students will be able:

        • To draft documents that demonstrate clear purpose, responsibility to audience, and adherence to generic and stylistic conventions.
        • To reflect on their own writing and apply alternative strategies to the continued development of that process.
        • To identify and evaluate an author's purpose and choice of audience, genre, and strategies of support.
        • To demonstrate knowledge of the variety of professional situations in which they will be writing when they leave the undergraduate program.


        Language and Linguistics
        Students will be able:

        • To demonstrate (In all courses) by clear writing and discussion an understanding of the core areas of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics.
        • To demonstrate by formula analysis and writing the detailed interactions of phonetics and phonology as they are manifested in English and other typologically organized phonetic and phonological systems.
        • To demonstrate by tree analysis, phrase structure rule analysis, transformational analysis and writing a detailed understanding of the principles and parameters approach to syntactic description and explanatory theory as these apply to at least SVO, SOV, and VSO languages.
        • To demonstrate in speech and through writing a firm grasp of the impact of cultural and historical events on the development of the language; and demonstrate through linguistic analytical methods and writing a detailed understanding of phonetic, phonological, morphological, syntactic and orthographic changes in the major periods of the history of the English language.
        • To demonstrate understanding of the major components of the methods and fieldwork techniques commonly used in linguistic research; articulate through data analysis and writing the interaction of language and society as theorized in sociolinguistics, gender studies and discourse analysis.

      • English M.A.

        Mission Statement

        The Graduate Program in English at UNR seeks to develop the ability to conduct significant research in the fields of literary criticism and writing studies; the ability to teach a range of courses in Composition and in British, American, and World Literatures in English; and the ability to understand and contribute to issues and debates in the field.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Students will complete their foreign language or auxiliary training by the time they register for comprehensive exam (795).

        Student Performance Indicators

        • M.A. Language, Literature, and Writing Emphases
          • Completion of foreign language requirement before registration for 795.
        • M.A Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Completion of foreign language or auxiliary training requirement before registration for 795.

        Assessment Method

        • M.A. Language, Literature, and Writing Emphases
          • Student's advisor will monitor student progress to determine if the student in on track for completion of language requirement.
        • M.A. Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Student's advisor will monitor student progress to determine if the student is on track for completion of the language/auxiliary training requirement.

        2. Students will complete required number of seminar and total hours.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Need to enter students' performance indicator, artifact.

        Assessment Method

        • Method - how faculty plan to assess students artifact.

        3. Students will complete comprehensive examinations.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • M.A. Language, Literature, Literature and Environment, and Writing Emphases
          • Completion of one credit of comprehensive examinations: including written and oral examinations as well as writing projects.

        Assessment Method

        • M.A. Language, Literature, Literature and Environment, and Writing Emphases
          • Student's chair and committee will evaluate student's written and oral examinations as well as writing projects.

        4. Student who chooses thesis option will write and defend both thesis prospectus and thesis.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Write a thesis that is a substantial scholarly and/or creative project.

        Assessment Method

        • Student's chair and committee will read and evaluate the thesis prospectus as well as finished thesis. Same will evaluate the student's oral defense of that thesis.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate broad knowledge of several of the historical fields in, literary genres of, and major critical approaches to British, American, and World Literatures in English; or, broad knowledge of writing studies issues and methodologies; or, broad knowledge in literary and rhetorical public engagement and its methodologies; or, broad knowledge of linguistics issues and methodologies.

        Student Performance Indicators
          • M.A. Literature Emphasis
            • Write seminar papers demonstrating achievement of broad knowledge of several of the historical fields in, literary genres of, and major critical approaches to British, American, and World Literatures in English.
          • M.A. Writing Emphasis
            • Write seminar papers demonstrating broad knowledge of writing studies and methodologies.
          • M.A. Language Emphasis
            • Write seminar papers demonstrating achievement of broad knowledge of research methods in linguistics and the structure of Old English.
          • M.A. Literature & Environment Emphasis
        • Write seminar papers demonstrating achievement of broad knowledge of several of the historical fields in, literary genres of, and major critical approaches to British, American, and World Literatures in English; write a seminar paper demonstrating broad knowledge of ecocriticism and theory.
        Assessment Method
        • M.A. Literature Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.
        • M.A. Writing Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.
        • M.A. Language Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.
        • M.A. Literature & Environment Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate specialized competence in the primary and secondary literature of an appropriate specialized sub-field of literature or writing or public engagement or language.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • M.A. Literature Emphasis
          • Write seminar papers demonstrating knowledge of literature and related fields.
        • M.A. Writing Emphasis
          • Write seminar and course papers demonstrating knowledge of writing methods and skills as well as writing a course paper demonstrating knowledge of a field of linguistics.
        • M.A. Language Emphasis
          • Write seminar and course papers demonstrating knowledge of linguistic methods and analysis.
        • M.A. Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Write seminar papers demonstrating knowledge of Literature and Environment and literature.
        Assessment Method
        • M.A. Literature Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.
        • M.A. Writing Emphasis
          • Professor will assess paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.
        • M.A. Language Emphasis
          • Professor will assess paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.
        • M.A. Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.

      • English - Creative Writing M.F.A.

        Mission Statement

        The objectives of the proposed MFA degree will be to provide top-level training and experience to writers of promise, in order to best prepare them to be publishing creative writers and/or to pursue careers in college-level teaching. In addition, the program will allow apprentice writers to develop their gifts amidst a community of artists in a university setting; the program will also provide a link between student writers and the wider professional community of published writers, editors, agents, etc. Students will produce bodies of original work, based on an understanding and study of historic, contemporary, and avant-garde literatures, culminating in a book-length thesis. Students will be expected not only to produce creative work, but to develop traditional scholarly and pedagogical skills, so as to better articulate their knowledge--to a potential audience including readers, colleagues, and students--as befits the recipient of a terminal degree in English.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate mastery of manipulation of elements of craft/technique within their chosen area of emphasis. (In fiction, this is defined as: form (the novel, novella, and short story); generic tropes; narrative structure; point of view; tone; and voice. In poetry this is defined as: traditional forms; line/enjambment; imagery and metaphor; meter; rhyme and free verse).
         
        2. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the contemporary publishing landscape for fiction (both genre and literary) and/or poetry, for book-length works as well as for individual stories/poems.
         
        3. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to curate/edit the creative work of others for publication.
         
        4. Students will be able to create a book-length of work of publishable creative writing, as well as identify its audience/market.
         
        5. Students will be able to analyze and describe their creative work within the context of historical trends/ movements and genres in literature.
         
        6. Students will be able to compile a professional portfolio demonstrating an understanding of future career options and approaches to same.
         
        Assessment Methods
         

        • Assessment of SLOs will be conducted not only on a student-by-student basis via grades in appropriate seminars and the process of thesis/bibliography/portfolio creation and defense, but also at a programmatic level by the English Graduate Committee, which will periodically review submitted theses, annotated bibliographies, and comprehensive exams for evidence of SLO achievement. The Graduate Committee will report these findings to the department and to the (at present ad hoc) MFA Committee, which will be tasked with reviewing/adjusting pedagogy and curriculum accordingly. In particular the program will be assessed at the end of Year 3 (at which point the first full class of students will graduate) and 5, and then every 3 years thereafter. The department/MFA Committee will conduct one-on-one exit interviews at the time of graduation and closely track student publications and related professional placements (academic positions, publishing jobs, etc.). We will conduct an external review of this new degree program as part of the department's next program review.
      • English Ph.D.

        Mission Statement

        The Graduate Program in English at UNR seeks to develop the ability to conduct significant research in the fields of literary criticism and writing studies; the ability to teach a range of courses in Composition and in British, American, and World Literatures in English; and the ability to understand and contribute to issues and debates in the field.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Students will complete their foreign language or auxiliary training by the time they register for comprehensive exam (795).

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Ph.D. Literature and Rhetoric and Composition Emphases
          • Completion of foreign language or linguistics requirement before registration for 795.
        • Ph.D. Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Completion of foreign language or auxiliary training requirement before registration for 795.

        Assessment Method

        • Ph.D. Literature and Rhetoric and Composition Emphases
          • Student's advisor will monitor student progress to determine if the student is on track for completion of the language/auxiliary training requirement.
        • Ph.D. Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Student's advisor will monitor student progress to determine if the student is on track for completion of the language/auxiliary training requirement.

        2. Students will transfer allowable credits from MA.

        3. Students will complete comprehensive examinations.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Ph.D. Literature Emphasis, Rhetoric and Composition Emphasis, and Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Completion of one credit of comprehensive examinations: including written and oral examinations as well as writing projects.

        Assessment Method

        • Ph.D. Literature Emphasis, Rhetoric and Composition Emphasis, and Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Student's chair and committee will evaluate student's written and oral examinations as well as writing projects.

        4. Student will write and defend both dissertation prospectus and dissertation.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Write a dissertation that is a substantial scholarly project employing theories and research methodologies widely recognized and published in literary or rhetorical studies.

        Assessment Method

        • Student's chair and committee will read and evaluate the dissertation prospectus as well as finished dissertation. Same will evaluate the student's oral defense of that dissertation.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate broad knowledge of several of the historical fields in, literary genres of, and major critical approaches to British, American, and World Literatures in English; or, broad knowledge of writing studies issues and methodologies.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Ph.D. Literature Emphasis
          • Write seminar papers demonstrating achievement of broad knowledge of several of the historical fields in, literary genres of, and major critical approaches to British, American, and World Literatures in English.
        • Ph.D. Rhetoric & Composition Emphasis
          • Write seminar papers that demonstrate broad knowledge of writing studies and methodologies.
        • Ph.D. Literature & Environment Emphasis
          • Write seminar papers demonstrating achievement of broad knowledge of several of the historical fields in, literary genres of, and major critical approaches to British, American, and World Literatures in English; write a seminar paper demonstrating broad knowledge of ecocriticism and theory.
        Assessment Method
        • Ph.D. Literature Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.
        • Ph.D. Rhetoric and Composition Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.
        • Ph.D. Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.

        2. Students will  be able to demonstrate specialized competence in the primary and secondary literature of an appropriate specialized sub-field of literature or composition and rhetoric.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Ph.D. Literature Emphasis
          • Write seminar papers demonstrating knowledge of literature and related fields.
        • Ph.D. Rhetoric and Composition Emphasis
          • Write seminar papers demonstrating knowledge of rhetoric and composition.
        • Ph.D. Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Write seminar papers demonstrating knowledge of Literature and Environment and literature.
        Assessment Method
        • Ph.D. Literature Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.
        • Ph.D. Rhetoric and Composition Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.
        • Ph.D. Literature and Environment Emphasis
          • Professor will assess seminar paper using rubric keyed to course learning objectives.

      World Languages and Literatures

      • French B.A.

        Mission Statement

        The faculty in French are committed to helping their majors attain a high degree of skill in the five areas of language usage: speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural understanding. With the increasing globalization of activity in all areas of public life, the importance for our students of entering the work force with a command of at least one foreign language cannot be doubted. French stands out among the available options by virtue of its importance in the fields of medicine, technology, diplomacy, and finance, among others, as well as by the interest which its distinctive cachet continues to inspire in beginning learners of the language. We may confidently expect--and statistical measures confirm this--that the demand for instruction in French will continue to grow at a healthy rate. By developing our students' skills in each of the five areas, we are preparing them to succeed in the greatest possible variety of situations where French may be required, without, however, neglecting our traditional mission of preparing the majority of them to pursue careers as secondary and college-level teachers of French. The members of the French section have opted to use the ACTFL (American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines as the main tool for assessing the performance of our incoming and exiting majors. Following their initial publication in 1986, the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines have gained widespread application as a metric against which to measure learners' functional competency; that is, their ability to accomplish linguistic tasks representing a variety of levels. The ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines offer a reliable and finely calibrated instrument for assessing what language learners can do with the language rather than what they cannot do.

        To measure speaking/listening in the foreign language, a special tool called the Modified Oral Proficiency Interview (MOPI) will be used. This nationalized assessment will show where majors are on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards for speaking/listening. The MOPI is an audio-mediated test of speaking proficiency. All MOPI items are based on the speaking proficiency guidelines developed by ACTFL. The test is presented to examinees via a test booklet and audio (either via a recording or in person). During testing, the examinee listens to directions for speaking tasks while following along in a test booklet. As the examinee responds to each task, his or her speaking performance is recorded. Each examinee's response is later evaluated by a trained rater (i.e. members of the assessment committee) who scores the performance according to the proficiency guidelines developed ACTFL. Each examinee receives a proficiency rating based on the ACTFL proficiency scale (http://actflproficiencyguidelines2012.org)

        To measure reading/writing in the foreign language, the French major will submit one of his/her research papers that was completed during the fourth year of study for a 400-level literature course in their major. The committee will then evaluate that paper using an established rubric.

        A rotating committee of faculty in French will serve on the assessment committee every Spring and Fall semester to evaluate speaking/listening and reading/writing.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students  will be able to read and comprehend literary and cultural texts written in French. Students are expected to have reached the Advanced range of reading proficiency (Advanced or Advanced-Plus, as specified in the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines for Reading).

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Majors, after finishing the required list of courses, choose a minimum of 2 courses numbered 407 or above. In any of those courses students will be expected to comprehend difficult literary and cultural texts written in French. They are called upon to discuss and analyze what they have read.
        Assessment Method
        • Students will be evaluated by traditional methods: successful completion of the class as demonstrated through exams, assignments, class presentations and discussions.

        2. Students will be able to speak French at the Intermediate Mid to Intermediate High range.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Students will take part in a Modified Oral Proficiency Interview with two trained faculty members in French.
        Assessment Method
        • When a student applies for graduation with a French major, he/she will be evaluated by two faculty members in French, who will agree upon an Oral Proficiency Rating, based on the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines for Speaking.

        3. Students will be able to write research papers in French that demonstrate writing proficiency in the Advanced range (Advanced Low, Mid or High, as specified in the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines for Writing).

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Students will submit a term paper that demonstrates their ability to present, develop and support an analytical argument. This paper would preferably be one written in a 400-level seminar on French literature.
        Assessment Method
        • Each student's paper will be evaluated by two faculty members who will agree upon a Writing Proficiency rating, based on the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines for Writing.
      • Spanish B.A.

        Mission Statement

        The Bachelor of Arts in Spanish program aims to educate students in reading and writing at advanced or higher proficiency levels, and in speaking and listening at intermediate mid or higher proficiency ranges, as well as to impart specialized knowledge of the diverse literatures and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world and to instill the ability to appreciate, analyze, and interpret Hispanic literary and cultural texts. The major is designed to provide students 1) a broad knowledge base from which to pursue an advanced degree, 2) the skills necessary to teach elementary levels of the language, 3) training for other careers that require linguistic and cultural competence in Spanish, and 4) personal fulfillment.


        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to write research papers in Spanish that reflect organized literary or cultural analysis, critical thinking, and writing proficiency in the Advanced (or higher) range.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Research papers at this level demonstrate familiarity with the subject matter, coherent introductory paragraphs with or without thesis statements, analytical development, critical thinking, logical conclusions, and citations that adhere to the MLA format. In accordance with the ACTFL Guidelines, writers at the Advanced level are characterized by the ability to write narratives, descriptions, and summaries of a factual nature. They can narrate and describe in the major time frames of past, present, and future, using paraphrasing and elaboration to provide clarity. Advanced-level writers produce connected discourse of paragraph length and structure. At this level, writers show good control of the most frequently used structures and generic vocabulary, allowing them to be understood by those unaccustomed to the writing of non-natives.
        Assessment Method
        • In an anonymous manner (see Implementation Plan, below), research papers completed by graduating seniors in a 400-level Hispanic literature or culture course will be submitted to the Spanish B.A. Literature and Culture Assessment Committee, which evaluates each paper using a rubric based on 1) the literary and cultural competencies exhibited in each paper, as expressed in the Performance Measures above, and 2) the ACTFL standards for writing at the Advanced level.

        2. Students will be able to converse in Spanish at the Intermediate Mid to Intermediate High (or higher) ranges.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • In accordance with the ACTFL Guidelines, speakers at the Intermediate High range are able to converse with ease and confidence when dealing with routine tasks and social situations. They can successfully handle uncomplicated tasks and social situations requiring an exchange of basic information related to their work, school, recreation, particular interests, and areas of competence. Speakers at the Intermediate Mid sublevel can successfully handle a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations.
        Assessment Method
        • On a voluntary basis (see Implementation Plan, below), graduating seniors will take part in a 20- to 30-minute Modified Oral Proficiency Interview with an ACTFL-trained tester of the Spanish B.A. Speaking and Listening Assessment Committee. The recorded interview is double-rated by the tester and by another ACTFL-trained member of the Committee against criteria outlined in the latest published ACTFL Speaking Guidelines by the interviewer and by another ACTFL-trained tester of the Committee.
      • World Languages and Literatures M.A.

        Mission Statement

        The mission of the graduate program in the Department of World Languages and Literatures, which offers a Master of Arts degree in World Languages and Literatures with a specialization in Spanish, is to educate students in Hispanic languages, literatures, and cultures at the highest possible level, as well as to provide students with both a broad knowledge base from which to pursue specialized studies and a depth of experience in scholarship and pedagogy that will advance their future research and professional activities. Among the practical objectives of the program is the formation of highly educated individuals who will be capable of one or more of the following, according to their abilities and interests:

        1. successfully completing a Ph.D. program or another advanced degree (M.D., J.D., etc.);
        2. securing a teaching position at an educational institution;
        3. improving their standing within the institutions in which they may already be employed;
        4. pursuing any career in which profound knowledge of Spanish and/or Hispanic cultures is a valuable asset.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Upon graduation, student will be prepared to achieve one of the following objectives: 1. Student pursues an advanced degree (e.g., Ph.D., M.D., J.D., etc.) in a program in which s/he has been accepted. 2. Student secures a teaching position at an educational institution. 3. Student improves standing within the institution where s/he was employed while pursuing coursework leading to the M.A. in WLL. 4. Student secures a professional position in which profound knowledge of Spanish and/or Hispanic cultures is a valuable asset.

        Assessment Method

        • Graduate student surveys, electronic communication, and telephone interviews conducted by the graduate director, the UNR Graduate School, and/or the UNR Office of University Assessment.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Student will be able to demonstrate familiarity with a variety of theoretical and research tools relevant to the field, including the use of MLA and APA Style (where appropriate), to engage in original research.

        Assessment Method
        • Student will complete multiple theoretically grounded research papers where either MLA or APA Style are used. Research papers are evaluated by graduate faculty during a student's participation in graduate coursework. Successful completion of an approved graduate Program of Study demonstrates successful completion of this Student Performance Indicator.

        2. Student will be able to demonstrate command of at least one world language other than English or Spanish.

        Assessment Method
        • Besides completing graduate coursework in English and Spanish, student completes coursework in an alternate world language (second-year level, minimum) or a translation exam in which the student translates from a target language (not Spanish) into English. Transcripts that demonstrate satisfactory completion of coursework in the alternate language or evaluation of a translation exam by a faculty member fluent in the target language are used to determine successful completion of this Student Performance Indicator.

        3. Student will be able to demonstrate an advanced command of the Spanish language in all four skill areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

        Assessment Method
        • Besides completing an approved Program of Study where use of the Spanish language in multiple forms is essential, student takes a comprehensive written exam over multiple areas concerning Spanish linguistics and pedagogy, as well as Hispanic literatures and cultures. Student also completes an oral defense where this Student Performance Indicator is evaluated. Graduate faculty assess the degree to which a student has achieved the knowledge base and communication skills necessary to satisfy this Student Performance Indicator.

        4. Student will be able to demonstrate a profound knowledge of Hispanic literatures and cultures.

        Assessment Method
        • Besides completing an approved Program of Study that explores various aspects of Hispanic literatures and cultures, student takes a comprehensive written exam over multiple areas of Hispanic literatures and cultures based on a corresponding reading list. Student also completes an oral defense where this Student Performance Indicator is evaluated. Graduate faculty assess the degree to which a student has achieved the knowledge base and critical skills necessary to impart relevant information to others in various forms.

        5. Student will be able to demonstrate an ability to critically analyze cultural texts and deliver a professional academic presentation in Spanish.

        Assessment Method
        • Student completes a written comprehensive exam and an oral defense in Spanish where multiple cultural texts are critically analyzed. Additionally, students may opt to complete an M.A. thesis. All graduate faculty evaluate the written comprehensive exam, while the student's Advisory-Examining Committee assesses student performance on the oral defense. Overall, the Advisory-Examining Committee determines if a student has satisfactorily completed this Student Performance Indicator.

      Gender, Race and Identity Studies

      • Gender, Race and Identity (Certificate)

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the intersections of gender, race, and identity.
        2. Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to apply theoretical perspectives in their analyses of gender, race, and identity.
      • Women's Studies B.A.

        Mission Statement

        Women's Studies provides an opportunity and frameworks for examining women and gender in relations to race, class, sexuality, multiculturalism, and globalization. The program emphasizes the interdisciplinary development of critical thinking, inquiry and analysis, ethical reasoning and practice, and local and global learning.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to define and describe issues concerning women and gender in relation to race, class, sexuality, colonialism, multiculturalism, and/or globalization.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Students completing introductory coursework will be able to: identify issues concerning women and gender (benchmark); describe issues concerning women and gender and/or make critical connection(s) between a women's or gender issue and race, class, sexuality, colonialism, multiculturalism, and/or globalization (low level milestone)
        Assessment Method
        • Students in all WMST 101 courses will have a number of shared exam questions

        2. Students will be able to critically compare and appraise theories, methods, and representations of women, gender, and feminism.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • To be determined Spring 2014: mid-level milestone; capstone
        Assessment Method
        • To be determined and enacted Spring 2014; assessment to take place in 400 level course

        3. Students will be able to compare and distinguish among historical understandings of gender in relation to structural inequality, social movements, and labor struggles.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • To be determined Spring 2014; mid-level milestone
        Assessment Method
        • To be determined and enacted Spring 2014; assessment to take place in GRI 257

        4. Students will be able to integrate and demonstrate comprehension of course content through oral presentations and critical, creative, and expository writing appropriate to audience.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • To be determined Spring 2014: mid-level milestones in one or more categories; capstone achievements in one or more categories
        Assessment Method
        • To be determined Spring 2014; enacted Fall 2014

        5. Students will be able to analyze gender and feminism from an interdisciplinary perspective, using a range of appropriate methodological tools.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Critical discussion of appropriate feminist theory and application of it to a cultural issue or production pertaining to women or gender. (mid-level milestone.)
        Assessment Method
        • Analysis of assignment in WMST 250, Introduction to Feminist Theory. Students will be asked to critically discuss appropriate feminist theory and apply it to a cultural issue or production pertaining to women or gender. Women's Studies faculty will develop rubric to assess component factors appropriate to mid-level milestone.

        6. Students will be able to integrate academic studies in Women's Studies into personal and professional goals and be able to formulate and implement theoretically informed political, cultural, and community action.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • To be determined Spring 2014
        Assessment Method
        • To be determined Spring 2014; enacted Spring 2015

      History

      • History B.A.

        Mission Statement

        Upon completion of the requirements for the major, the undergraduate student in the Department of History will demonstrate competency in discipline-based content as well as research, analytical, writing & presentation skills in preparation for advanced degrees in graduate and professional schools or other history-related careers.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Students with one or more History courses in their senior thesis topic/area prior to completing will be able to demonstrate broader competency in the historical subject than students without such related background courses.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Students will complete culminating tasks (senior thesis) in History 499:
          - Write and submit a senior thesis under the supervision of their faculty advisor;
          - Present/defend their senior thesis during the Senior Thesis/Project Colloquium.

        Assessment Method

        • The Undergraduate Advisor ensures that all students fulfill the requirements for the major:
          - Students' advisors will assess each senior thesis of student advisees using the departmentally approved rubric;
          - Faculty attending the thesis defense will rate student skills and presentations using a departmentally approved rubric.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. In the completion of the senior thesis, students will be able to:

        • Demonstrate research skills related to historical subject matter using bibliographic tools
        • Critically assess and question primary and secondary sources
        • Analyze within the cultural context
        • Write historical analyses
        Student Performance Indicators
        • Students will complete culminating tasks (senior thesis) in History 499:
          - Write and submit a senior thesis under the supervision of their faculty advisor;
          - Present/defend their senior thesis during the Senior Thesis/Project Colloquium.
        Assessment Method
        • The Undergraduate Advisor ensures that all students fulfill the requirements for the major:
          - Students' advisors will assess each senior thesis of student advisees using the departmentally approved rubric;
          - Faculty attending the thesis defense will rate student skills and presentations using a departmentally approved rubric.

        2. Students willbe able todemonstrate skill in oral participation and presentation of research analyses.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Students will present/defend their senior thesis/project research during the Senior Thesis/Project Colloquium.
        Assessment Method
        • Faculty attending the thesis defense will rate student presentations using a departmentally approved rubric.
      • History M.A.

        Mission Statement

        The Master of Arts in History offers the student understanding in the scholarly discipline of history through the expansion of historical knowledge, the comprehension of historiography, and the practice of critical inquiry. Framing the questions that define particular scholarly debates underlies critical analysis of primary and secondary sources. Students gain exposure to these questions in course work and demonstrate their familiarity with them in comprehensive examinations. In the thesis, they display awareness of the scope and challenges of historical research: They define what questions can and cannot be addressed with a limited body of sources. They situate their research and analysis in the historiography of a field. Ultimately they discuss their work at a final thesis colloquium.

        Master of Arts students in History pursue the degree for diverse reasons. Some anticipate applying to Ph.D. programs, either at UNR or nationally. More hope to use the degree for other sorts of professional work: teaching at the community college or high school level; work in cultural resource management or state or federal agencies; employment in public history (museums, historic preservation); research in the private sector. Still others pursue the M.A. degree for the love of history, without specific career objectives. The Department of History welcomes all of these reasons, while expecting all M.A. students to achieve the outcomes described below.

        The Department of History reviewed and revised its Master of Arts program requirements substantially in 1993-1994 and again in 1999-2000. The former revision led to creation of the introductory Pro-seminar (History 600), which introduces new students to professional expectations and requirements for the degree, as well as to the fields offered in the Department. The latter revision honed the descriptions of comprehensive examinations and the thesis, to clarify what students are expected to demonstrate.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Students will be prepared with the knowledge and skills required for future productive research, effective teaching, and independent reading and scholarship.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Student success rate finding professional employment, as reported by students; or student success rate applying to Ph.D. programs, as reported by students; or student satisfaction with the outcomes of the degree.

        Assessment Method

        • Tracking of alumni (approx. every two years) through surveys about use of the M.A. degree. Number of graduates who applied to Ph.D. programs who were admitted.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge and understanding of particular periods, geographical regions, and topics in history.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Every M.A. student writes a thesis, generally focused in one of the comprehensive examination fields. The thesis is expected to demonstrate proficiency in its topic, and familiarity with the larger scholarly field of that topic.
        • Every M.A. student takes at least 25 credits of course work, most in courses focused on a historical period, place/region, or subject of inquiry.
        • Every M.A. student chooses three fields of concentration (comprehensive examination fields), and takes at least six credits in each of these fields.
        Assessment Method
        • The Thesis
          1. Every M.A. student prepares a prospectus of his/her thesis, which is presented in writing and at a thesis prospectus colloquium attended by his/her advisory-examining committee. The committee must approve the proposal for the thesis to proceed.
          2. Every M.A. thesis is read by all members of the student's advisory-examining committee, who must approve the thesis in order for the student to graduate.
          3. Every M.A. student has a final oral exam (thesis defense), evaluated by the advisory-examining committee.
        • Individual faculty members grade each student's performance in course work. At least once a year, the Graduate Advisor evaluates every student's overall progress.
        • Fields of Concentration:
          1. In selecting the fields, the student meets with his/her entire Advisory-Examining Committee (the faculty supervising the fields) to approve the Program of Study, no later than the completion of nine credits.
          2. Written comprehensive examinations (four hours each), taken after completion of at least 24 credits, test proficiency in the fields; each exam is evaluated by at least two members of the faculty. Each reader writes an evaluation of the exam; students receive copies of these evaluations.

        2. Students will be able to define historiography (the history of historical scholarship and debate), and demonstrate familiarity with the particular historiography of their chosen examination and thesis fields.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • All M.A. students take comprehensive examinations in three fields. Examinations are based on essay questions, primarily dealing with historical scholarship in those fields.
        • All M.A. students must take at least one core seminar in historiography or historical methods (History 700, 701, 780, 781, 782, 783).
        • All M.A. students write a master's thesis, which must demonstrate familiarity with the relevant existing scholarship on its topic.
        Assessment Method
        • Every comprehensive examination is read and evaluated by at least two members of the faculty. Each reader writes an evaluation of the exam; students receive copies of these evaluations.
        • Individual faculty grade each student's performance in core seminars. At least once a year, the Graduate Advisor evaluates every student's overall progress.
        • The thesis prospectus (see above) must include a bibliography of relevant scholarship. In reading the student's thesis and in the final oral exam, members of his/her advisory-examining committee evaluate its effective use of existing scholarly literature.

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in critical inquiry and historical research methods.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • On comprehensive examinations, the student should demonstrate the ability to make reasoned observations about the relevant historiography and/or about specific works, and to craft an argument in response to each question.
        • In most courses, students are required to perform research in primary source materials and/or in historical scholarship.
        • The thesis must be a work of original scholarship, based on research in primary sources and current methods of historical analysis.
        Assessment Method
        • Every comprehensive examination is read and evaluated by at least two members of the faculty. Each reader writes an evaluation of the exam; students receive copies of these evaluations.
        • Individual faculty grade each student's performance in course work.
        • The thesis prospectus (see above) explains the primary sources to be used and the methodology to be applied. In reading the student's thesis and in the final oral exam, members of his/her advisory/examining committee evaluate its methodology for currency and appropriate use.

      • Teaching History (M.A.T.)

        Mission Statement

        The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program in History is designed primarily for practicing elementary and secondary teachers of history and social studies. The program offers the opportunity for K-12 teachers to work toward a content-based master's degree in History, tailored to their specific needs. The program is aligned with the Washoe County history standards; course and comprehensive exam requirements have a teaching-based component; required and recommended courses offer the opportunity to complete the degree while working full-time.

        The M.A.T. program is part of our Department's broader partnership with K-12 education in northern Nevada, which also includes institutes and seminars funded by the U.S. Department of Education, collaboration with the College of Education to provide in-service programs for K-12 teachers, and other activities.

        This degree program was approved by the Board of Regents in April 2002, and the first cohort of M.A.T. students began the program in January 2003. The material below is taken from the program proposal, as approved by the Board of Regents.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate deepened understanding of historical content, particularly in current interpretations and scholarly methods.

        Performance Indicators

        • Every M.A.T. student takes at least 31 credits of course work, most in courses focused on a historical period, place/region, or subject of inquiry.
        • Every M.A.T. student takes two courses in historiography: the study of interpretations of historical events. (These courses include History 781, 782, 783.)

        Assessment Method

        • Individual faculty members grade each student's performance in course work. At least once a year, the Graduate Advisor evaluates every student's overall progress.
          1. In selecting the fields, the student meets with his/her entire Advisory-Examining Committee (the faculty supervising the fields) to approve the Program of Study, no later than the completion of 24 credits.
          2. Comprehensive work consists of an examination in one field, and a curriculum teaching unit in the other. The examination, taken after completion of at least 31 credits, tests proficiency in the fields; each exam is evaluated by at least two members of the faculty. Each reader writes an evaluation of the exam; students receive copies of these evaluations. The curriculum unit requirement tests the ability to incorporate current scholarly interpretations and methods into classroom preparation. All members of the student's committee review the curriculum unit, which must include a substantial annotated bibliography of scholarly sources as well as teaching materials.
          3. Use in their own K-12 classrooms of content knowledge gained through the M.A.T. program, as self-reported by current and former M.A.T. students.

        2.  Students will be able to demonstrate familiarity with the most recent pedagogy in social-studies education.

        Performance Indicators

        • All M.A.T. students must take at least six credits in College of Education courses, including courses in social-studies education.
        • M.A.T. comprehensive work includes a curriculum unit plan, which must demonstrate facility with current pedagogical scholarship (as well as current historical scholarship).

        Assessment Method

        • Individual faculty in the College of Education grade each student's performance in these courses.
          1. The student's committee, usually including a curriculum specialist from the College of Education, evaluates the curriculum unit plan for its use and citation (in the annotated bibliography) of relevant research in social-studies pedagogy.
          2. Use in their own K-12 classrooms of pedagogical approaches learned within the M.A.T. program, as self-reported by current and former M.A.T. students.
          3. Conference presentation and professional-journal publication of curriculum materials developed from study in the M.A.T. program.
      • History Ph.D.

        Mission Statement

        The Ph.D. in History offers the student mastery of the scholarly discipline of history through the expansion of historical knowledge, the comprehension of historiography, and the practice of critical inquiry. Ph.D. students are expected to make original contributions to a field of historical knowledge, through the dissertation. Areas of major study (dissertation) for the Ph.D. include Nevada and the West, U.S. history, American Studies, cultural history, history of science, history of medicine, and selected fields in European history.

        Ph.D. students in History pursue the degree for diverse reasons. While some anticipate applying for positions at four-year colleges and universities, others wish to teach in community colleges, to work in cultural resource management, in state or federal agencies, or in public history (museums, historic preservation), and to pursue independent scholarship. The Department of History welcomes all of these reasons, while expecting all Ph.D. students to achieve the outcomes described below.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Students will be prepared with the knowledge and skills required for future productive research, effective teaching, and independent reading and scholarship.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Student success rate finding professional employment in their chosen fields, as reported by students; or student satisfaction with the outcomes of the degree.

        Assessment Method

        • Tracking of alumni (approx. every two years) through surveys about use of the Ph.D. degree.
          Number of graduates who are pursuing careers related to their Ph.D. work, and who obtained employment in their chosen fields (including but not limited to academic employment in four-year colleges and universities).

        2. All PhD students will complete their degree in a timely manner.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • The Assessment will track students' time to degree with student's major advisor.

        Assessment Method

        • Faculty will review appropriateness of student's time to degree completion.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge and mastery of particular periods, geographical regions, and topics in history.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Every Ph.D. student chooses three fields of concentration (comprehensive examination fields), and takes at least six credits in each of these fields.
        • Every Ph.D. student writes a doctoral dissertation, generally focused in one of the comprehensive examination fields. The dissertation is a work of significant original scholarly research and analysis. It should contribute to historical knowledge, exhibit a mastery of the sources and secondary literature of the subject and the techniques of exploiting them, and display a fair degree of literary skill.
        • Every Ph.D. student takes at least 25 credits of course work beyond the master's degree, most in courses focused on a historical period, place/region, or subject of inquiry.
        Assessment Method
        1. Every Ph.D. student is evaluated by the Department during his/her first six weeks of enrollment, in the form of an entrance interview to assess background, strengths, and possible deficiencies in order to assist the faculty in recommending a program of study.
        2. In selecting the fields, the student meets with his/her entire Advisory-Examining Committee (the faculty supervising the fields) to approve the Program of Study, no later than the completion of nine credits.
        3. Another committee meeting takes place the semester before the student anticipates taking comprehensive examinations, to assess progress.
        4. Written comprehensive examinations (six hours each), taken after completion of at least 24 credits, test proficiency in the fields; each exam is evaluated by at least two members of the faculty. Each reader writes an evaluation of the exam; students receive copies of these evaluations.
        1. Every Ph.D. student prepares a prospectus of his/her dissertation, which is presented in writing and at a prospectus colloquium attended by his/her advisory-examining committee. The committee must approve the proposal for the dissertation to proceed.
        2. Every Ph.D. dissertation is read by all members of the student's advisory-examining committee, who must approve the dissertation in order for the student to graduate.
        3. Every Ph.D. student has a final oral exam (dissertation defense), evaluated by the advisory-examining committee.
        4. Individual faculty members grade each student's performance in course work. At least once a year, the Graduate Advisor evaluates every student's overall progress.

        2. Students will be able to define historiography (the history of historical scholarship and debate), and demonstrate familiarity with the particular historiography of their chosen examination and thesis fields.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • All Ph.D. students must take at least two core seminars: one in historiography (History 781, 782, or 783) and one in historical methods and theory (History 700, 701, or 780).
        • All Ph.D. students take comprehensive examinations in three fields. Examinations are based on essay questions, primarily dealing with historical scholarship in those fields.
        • All Ph.D. students write a doctoral dissertation, which must demonstrate mastery of the relevant existing scholarship on its topic.
        Assessment Method
        • Individual faculty grade each student's performance in core seminars. At least once a year, the Graduate Advisor evaluates every student's overall progress.
        • Every comprehensive examination is read and evaluated by at least two members of the faculty. Each reader writes an evaluation of the exam; students receive copies of these evaluations.
        • The dissertation prospectus (see above) must include a bibliography of relevant scholarship. In reading the student's dissertation and in the final oral exam, members of his/her advisory-examining committee evaluate its effective use of existing scholarly literature.

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in critical inquiry and historical research methods.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • In most courses, students are required to perform research in primary source materials and/or in historical scholarship.
        • On comprehensive examinations, the student should demonstrate the ability to make reasoned observations about the relevant historiography and/or about specific works, and to craft an argument in response to each question.
        • The dissertation must be a work of original scholarship, based on research in primary sources and current methods of historical analysis.
        Assessment Method
        • Individual faculty grade each student's performance in course work.
        • Every comprehensive examination is read and evaluated by at least two members of the faculty. Each reader writes an evaluation of the exam; students receive copies of these evaluations.
        • The dissertation prospectus (see above) explains the primary sources to be used and the methodology to be applied. In reading the student's thesis and in the final oral exam, members of his/her advisory/ examining committee evaluate its methodology for currency and appropriate use.

      Music

      • Music (B.A. and B.M. in Applied Music)

        Mission Statement

        The University of Nevada, Reno Department of Music provides education in the history, performance, theory, and pedagogy of music. Its mission is to help students acquire the skills and knowledge to enable them to successfully contribute as performers, scholars, and educators. At the same time, the Department stands committed to supporting the creative endeavors of its faculty, and to fostering a close relationship with the greater Northern Nevada community.
        To this end, and following the mission of the University as a whole, the Department of Music resolves to:

        • provide high quality, accredited, undergraduate and graduate degree programs in music performance, education, and research.
        • offer music courses, ensembles, and concerts that reflect the diversity and richness of the world's cultures.
        • maintain a learning environment where student performers and scholars may regularly interact with professional teacher/mentors.
        • encourage faculty to produce outstanding creative work in performance, composition, and scholarship.
        • serve the University's College of Arts and Sciences by providing Core Curriculum courses and contributing to College committees.
        • promote the musical life of the Northern Nevada community at large by participating in or sponsoring a broad array of concerts, workshops,course offerings, and performance institutions.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1.  Students will be able to to perform on an instrument or voice at a minimum semi-professional level.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Junior Recital
        • Jury exam performances every semester
        • Upper Division Performance Barriers
        • Senior Recital
        Assessment Method
        • All Bachelor of Music Majors must satisfactorily complete a junior recital performance juried by a music faculty committee of three.
        • Faculty committees grade and advise all music majors in performance at the end of each semester
        • All Bachelor of Music majors must pass a barrier exam in performance in order to gain upper division standing in applied lessons
        • All Bachelor of Music Majors must satisfactorily complete a senior recital performance juried by a music faculty committee of three.

        2.  Students will be able to master basic musicianship skills (piano, rhythm, pitch discrimination).

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Pitch recognition, melodic, and harmonic aural skills
        • Rhythmic acuity
        • Upper division vocal barrier. Vocal performance and education majors only
        • Piano Proficiency
        • Upper division continuation examinations.
        Assessment Method
        • All music majors must pass a series of "Music Lab" tests that measure a student's ability to hear melodies and chords as part of our Sight-Singing and Dictation course sequence. They must also pass a 30 minute rhythmic, singing and listening final examination with one of the sight-singing faculty upon completion of Music 212.
        • All Bachelor of Music majors must pass a series of "Tap" rhythm tests as part of our Sight-Singing and Dictation course sequence. They must also read and count various examples from the Robert Starer "Rhythmic Training" textbook.
        • The vocal upper division barrier exam includes the performance of works in English, French, German and Italian. Additional requirements include preparation of an assigned work over a 24 hour period with no faculty coaching and singing/reading various intervals, scales, chords and melodies.
        • All Bachelor of Music majors must pass a comprehensive piano proficiency exam before they are allowed to graduate.
        • All Bachelor of Music students must pass an extensive written theory examination and a 30 minute sight-singing examination. Both must be passed as a prerequisite for most 300 level music courses. These examinations are routinely scheduled after completion of Music 302 Music Theory IV and Music 312 Sight-singing and Dictation. All transfer students must take the examinations.

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of basic musical arranging/composing concepts.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Orchestration and/or Jazz Arranging
        • Counterpoint
        Assessment Method
        • All Bachelor of Music majors are evaluated on their ability to write for various musical instruments as part of the requirements for either Orchestration or Jazz Arranging. These courses both include a barrier exam involving a "live" performance of their own arrangement.
        • All Bachelor of Music majors are evaluated on their ability to write multiple musical lines in counterpoint as part of the 4-semester Music Theory sequence.
      • Music Education (B.A.)

        Mission Statement

        The University of Nevada, Reno Department of Music provides education in the history, performance, theory, and pedagogy of music. Its mission is to help students acquire the skills and knowledge to enable them to successfully contribute as performers, scholars, and educators. At the same time, the Department stands committed to supporting the creative endeavors of its faculty, and to fostering a close relationship with the greater Northern Nevada community.

        To this end, and following the mission of the University as a whole, the Department of Music resolves to:

        • provide high quality, accredited, undergraduate and graduate degree programs in music performance, education, and research.
        • offer music courses, ensembles, and concerts that reflect the diversity and richness of the world's cultures.
        • maintain a learning environment where student performers and scholars may regularly interact with professional teacher/mentors.
        • encourage faculty to produce outstanding creative work in performance, composition, and scholarship.
        • serve the University's College of Arts and Sciences by providing Core Curriculum courses and contributing to College committees.
        • promote the musical life of the Northern Nevada community at large by participating in or sponsoring a broad array of concerts, workshops, course offerings, and performance institutions.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to perform on an instrument or voice at a semi-professional level.

        Performance Indicators

        • Be able to perform a variety of Western Classical repertoire on their respective instrument. Demonstrate an excellent technical command of their instrument and the ability to interpret, phrase and play musically.

        Assessment Method

        • Jury exam performances every semester where faculty committees grade and advise all majors in performance at the end of each semester.
        • Upper division performance barriers where all Music Education majors must pass a barrier exam in performance in order to gain upper division standing in applied lessons.
        • Senior Recital where all Music Education majors must satisfactorily complete a recital performance juried by a music faculty committee of three.

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate mastery of basic musicianship skills (piano, rhythm, pitch discrimination).

        Performance Indicators

        • Pitch recognition, melodic and harmonic aural skills
        • Rhythmic acuity
        • Music Instruction/Methods

        Assessment Method

        • All Bachelor of Music Education majors must pass a series of "Music Lab" tests that measure a student's ability to hear melodies and chords as part of our Sight-Singing and Dictation course sequence. They must also pass a 30 minute rhythmic, singing and listening final examination with one of the sight-singing faculty upon completion of Music 212.
        • All Bachelor of Music Education majors must pass a comprehensive piano proficiency exam before they are allowed in the student internship program.
        • All Bachelor of Music Education majors must pass a series of "Tap" rhythm tests as part of our Sight-Singing and Dictation course sequence. They must also read and count various examples from the Robert Starer "Rhythmic Training" textbook.
        • Upper division vocal Music Education barrier exam includes the performance of works in English, French, German and Italian. Additional requirements include preparation of an assigned work over a 24 hour period with no faculty coaching and singing/reading various intervals, scales, chords and melodies. All students must pass this exam to gain upper division standing in applied lessons.
        • All Bachelor of Music Education students are required to take 10 credits of Methods course work in their chosen track of study: instrumental, vocal or general elementary.
        • Upper division continuation exam where all Bachelor of Music Education majors must pass an extensive written theory examination and a 30 minute sight-singing examination. Both must be passed as a prerequisite for most 300 level music courses. These examinations are routinely scheduled after completion of Music 302 Music Theory IV and Music 312 Sight-singing and Dictation. All transfer students must take the examinations.

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of basic musical arranging/composing concepts.

        Performance Indicators

        • Counterpoint
        • Orchestration

        Assessment Method

        • All music education majors are evaluated on their ability to write multiple musical lines in counterpoint as part of the 4 semester Music Theory sequence.
        • All music education majors are evaluated on their ability to write for various musical instruments as part of the requirements of their Orchestration class. The class includes an arranging barrier exam: a "live" performance of their own arrangement.

        4. Students will be able to demonstrate the necessary professional/teaching skills in order to be successful in the classroom.

        Performance Indicators

        • Instrumental, vocal and general music pedagogy
        • Classroom management
        • Planning and delivery of instruction
        • Diversity among students and learning environments
        • Student assessment
        • Commitment to the profession

        Assessment Method

        • All music education majors are evaluated on their ability to perform at a basic level on brass, woodwind, string and percussion instruments and voice as part of their music methods courses.
        • All music education majors are evaluated on their ability to teach in real classroom situations during their required 14-week student internship in public schools. Evaluators include an assigned master teacher and members of the music education faculty.
        • All Music Education majors are evaluated on their ability to create and execute lesson plans for the instrumental, vocal and general music settings, K-12.
        • All Music Education students are evaluated on their ability to differentiate instruction in various learning environments with differing student populations through observations, simulated and real classroom teaching and lesson plans in their music education and education coursework.
        • All Music Education students are evaluated in five domains as defined by the College of Education (Students and learning environments; Planning; Delivery and management; Assessment; Professionalism) through a portfolio completed as part of the student intern application. This portfolio contains "artifacts" such as lesson plans, observation reflections, recorded teaching examples, position papers and workshop notes.
      • Music (M.A. and M.M.)

        Mission Statement

        The University of Nevada, Reno Department of Music provides education in the history, performance, theory, and pedagogy of music. Its mission is to help students acquire the skills and knowledge to enable them to successfully contribute as performers, scholars, and educators. At the same time, the Department stands committed to supporting the creative endeavors of its faculty, and to fostering a close relationship with the greater Northern Nevada community.

        To this end, and following the mission of the University as a whole, the Department of Music resolves to:

        • provide high quality, accredited, undergraduate and graduate degree programs in music performance, education, and research.
        • offer music courses, ensembles, and concerts that reflect the diversity and richness of the world's cultures.
        • maintain a learning environment where student performers and scholars may regularly interact with professional teacher/mentors.
        • encourage faculty to produce outstanding creative work in performance, composition, and scholarship.
        • serve the University's College of Arts and Sciences by providing Core Curriculum courses and contributing to College committees.
        • promote the musical life of the Northern Nevada community at large by participating in or sponsoring a broad array of concerts, workshops, course offerings, and performance institutions.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to write and conduct research at a professional level.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Wide-ranging knowledge of music history, covering both aspects of classical and popular musics
        • Knowledge of the research methods from the fields of musicology, history, and other related fields
        • Ability to research and write at a professional level
        • (MA-Music only) must demonstrate an advanced knowledge of a specific area of music history
        • Final project (Music Education only)
        Assessment Method
        • Completion of course work both within and outside of the musicology area
        • Comprehensive exams
        • Master's Thesis
        • All Master of Music in Music Education students are required to complete final projects based upon their coursework. Past final projects have included lecture/recitals, research studies and curriculums. All projects are overseen by the music education advisor and the students' graduate committees.

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of music theory and music history.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Music Theory and History Proficiency Exam
        • History and theory course requirements
        Assessment Method
        • All entering Master of Music candidates must pass a Music Theory and Music History proficiency exam in order to attain graduate status during their first year.
        • All Master's students are required to complete at least one graduate level theory course and one graduate level history course.

        3. Students in the Master of Music in Performance program will be able to perform at a professional level.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Jury exam performances as deemed necessary by the students' major teacher
        • Comprehensive examinations
        • Two Master's Recitals
        Assessment Method
        • Faculty committees grade and advise any Master of Music majors in performance at the end of any semester that a grade of C or lower is given on their major instrument.
        • All performance majors are required to complete comprehensive examinations covering materials chosen by the applied teacher.
        • All performance majors must satisfactorily complete two full public recitals juried by their graduate committee.

      Philosophy

      • Ethics, Law, & Politics (Certificate)

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to state a thesis about an ethical, legal or political problem or text, explain the thesis, and provide evidence and argument (including replies to counter-arguments) in its defense.
        2. Students will be able to explain and interpret the ideas associated with major figures and movements in ethical, legal, and political philosophy.
        3. Students will be able to distinguish better and worse reasoning, and recognize relevant logical relationships and patterns of inference.
        4. Students will be able to show what is at stake in an abstract debate in ethics, law, or politics and indicate how different positions in these debates might have concrete or theoretical implications.
      • Philosophy (B.A.)

        Mission Statement

        Since philosophical virtues lie at the core of a general, liberal education, our teaching mission is to help students develop into mature, rational, morally sensitive, independent thinkers. This means fostering their ability to think and to communicate their ideas clearly, cogently, and respectfully about the complex philosophical issues concerning ethics, knowledge and justification, human nature, and world conceptions that arise in all fields of study as well as in life. This includes the ability to appreciate and evaluate alternative points of view. In this role we serve all students who take our courses. In addition, we aim to produce majors cognizant of the main lines of historical and contemporary Western philosophical thought in such a way as to prepare them for a variety of positions in the work world as well as to enjoy an enriched life. Further, we aim to provide a route to graduate study or professional schooling, e.g., in philosophy or law, for students with those career goals.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to state a thesis about a philosophical problem or text, explain the thesis, and provide evidence and argument (including replies to counter-arguments) in its defense. 

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Can read, interpret, and communicate complex material with (no, some, a great deal of) help from the instructor (depending upon the difficulty of the material).
        • Can recognize and communicate orally and in writing what is at stake in a passage--the central issues, problems, and outcomes--in such a way as to bring out the underlying tensions and perplexities; can get beyond superficial interpretations. Can discern relevant similarities and differences among issues and positions.
        • Can discern relevant similarities and differences among issues and positions.
        • Can discriminate arguments and evidence from other forms of discourse; can distinguish premises from conclusions and determine the kind of reasoning involved (deductive, inductive, a priori, a posteriori, etc.).
        • Can recognize assumptions, see their more straightforward consequences, and challenge them where appropriate, in the context of evaluating the cogency of a position or argument.
        • Can think independently; able to commit pro or contra a position and defend or attack it, whether or not it is endorsed by the text or the instructor.
        Assessment Method
        • Specific example: experienced majors should be able to read the early dialogues of Plato, Descartes's Discourse on Method, and the Declaration of Independence on their own with a fair understanding of the problems and solutions offered and should be able to read and understand Kant's Prolegomena to any Future Metaphysics with help from the instructor. [The following general Methods of Assessment (MAs) apply to all of the Learning Outcomes and their Performance Indicators, collectively.] a. The usual methods of class performance evaluation, as summarized by grades, including improvement (or the reverse) over time, and student evaluations. Grades in all philosophy courses except logic depend heavily upon the evaluation of student papers as well as exams. The exams are typically essay exams. Usually, oral performance in discussion is also a factor. b. Additional evaluation by all Philosophy Department instructors in the form of informal, personal notes on the performance of each major in their classes, with respect to our mission and goals (as a memory aid for c). Such multidimensional information is often more informative than grades. c. Annual review of all majors, with attention to their performance in the above dimensions and also to their choice of courses. d. Instructor reports to the department chair of names of students whose interest and aptitude identify them as possible majors or minors. e. Voluntary exit interviews of graduating majors by the department chair, structured to elicit information relevant to the department mission statement and learning outcome goals. f. Every two years conduct a curriculum review in which we compare the curricula and course schedules of a sample of about five comparable or better departments for comparison with our own and also determine how well our curriculum satisfies diversity, interdisciplinary, and other goals of the university's strategic plan. g. Occasional surveys of alumni, with the assistance of the Office of University Assessment. h. Occasional peer visitation of classes to evaluate instructors, especially in the case of TAs, LOAs, and postdocs.
        • E.g., can distinguish mere verbal disagreements from substantive disputes, can recognize major fallacies and attempts to evade the issue. (Please see also the general AMs listed above.)
        • E.g., depending on courses taken, should be able to distinguish Aristotle from Plato, empiricism from rationalism, late from early Wittgenstein, soft from hard determinism, pragmatism from positivism, being ready-to-hand from being ready-at-hand. (Please see also the above list of general AMs.)
        • (See the above list of general AMs.)
        • (Please see the above list of AMs.)
        • (Please see the above list of general AMs.)

        2. Students will be able to explain and interpret the ideas associated with major figures and movements in philosophy, and analyze issues and problems in the different main branches of philosophical inquiry.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Is responsive to arguments and evidence, i.e., can think and communicate rationally.
        • Can invent appropriate examples, counterexamples, arguments, alternative positions, and reframings of the question.
        • Can make insightful observations (e.g., comparisons or contrasts) that go beyond what the instructor or teacher has said.
        Assessment Method
        • (Please see AMs listed above.)
        • (Please see the above list of general AMs.)
        • (Please see the above list of general AMs.)

        3. Students will be able to distinguish better and worse reasoning, and recognize relevant logical relationships and patterns of inference.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Possesses broad knowledge of the history of philosophy.
        • Displays familiarity with several prominent philosophical problems and positions, including some from each of the major areas of philosophy: epistemology, metaphysics, value theory, and logic or theory of rationality.
        • Is familiar with some important contemporary developments.
        Assessment Method
        • (Please see the AMs listed above.)
        • (Please see the above list of general AMs.)
        • (Please see the above list of general AMs.)

        4. Students will be able to show what is at stake in an abstract debate, historical or contemporary, and indicate how a philosophical view might have concrete implications or make a difference in theory or practice.  

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Is sensitive to value considerations (especially moral but also political and aesthetic) and can discern value-laden discourse from other discourse.
        • Can appreciate other points of view and the concerns and situations of other individuals and groups.
        Assessment Method
        • (Please see the above list of general AMs.)
        • (Please see the above list of general MAs.)

      • Philosophy (M.A.)

        Mission Statement

        The M.A. program in Philosophy seeks to aid our students in becoming philosophic by helping them to acquire a knowledge of the intellectual tradition of philosophy and to develop their critical and creative intellectual capacities through reading, writing and discussion.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. THESIS PLAN: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of intellectual traditions of philosophy; ability to argue and interpret; development of critical and creative intellectual capacities.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Completion of 30 credits of graduate coursework (6 to 9 of which may be outside the department in an approved subject area.
        • Completion of 18 credits in 700-level classes.
        • Where desired, preparation for further graduate study.
        • Completion of the comprehensive examination.
        • Completion of a thesis; showing proficiency on thesis topic and knowledge of the broader field.
        • recommended study of a foreign language (especially for students intending to go on to further graduate study.
        Assessment Method
        • Completion of coursework (with timely movement to completion.
        • Completion of required 700-level classes.
        • Placement in graduate program (where appropriate).
        • Exit interviews.
        • Alumni surveys at three-year intervals for twelve years with attention to jobs attained, publications, achievement of tenure and promotion or other suitable job advancement (in both academic and non academic careers) or other favorable outcome of the degree.
        • Committee of the whole meets once a year to discuss each student's overall performance and achievement of the SPIs (materials attesting to the SPIs to be solicited or collected by the graduate coordinator for the meeting).
        • Passing comprehensive exams; showing proficiency in argument and interpretation on the selected topics as well as more general critical and creative abilities in the field (student's advisor to discuss exam with student after completion).
        • Completion and defense of thesis (with timely movement to completion); thesis shows strong knowledge in the topics selected as well as argumentative and interpretive proficiency and more general critical and creative abilities.
        • Study of a foreign language.

        2. NON THESIS PLAN: Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of intellectual traditions of philosophy; ability to argue and interpret; development of critical and creative intellectual capacities.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Completion of 33 credits of graduate coursework (9 to 12 of which may be outside the department in an approved subject area).
        • Completion of 18 credits in 700-level classes.
        • Completion of the comprehensive examination.
        • Recommended study of a foreign language (especially for students intending to go on to further graduate study).
        Assessment Method
        • Completion of coursework (with timely movement to completion).
        • Completion of required 700-level classes.
        • Passing comprehensive exams; showing proficiency in argument and interpretation on the selected topics as well as more general critical and creative proficiency in the field (student's advisor to discuss exam with student after completion).
        • Study of a foreign language.
        • placement in graduate program (where appropriate).
        • Exit interviews.
        • Alumni surveys at three-year intervals for twelve years with attention to jobs attained, publications, achievement of tenure and promotion or other suitable job advancement (in both academic and non academic careers) or other favorable outcome of the degree.
        • Committee of the whole meets once a year to discuss each student's overall performance and achievement of the SPIs (materials attesting to the SPIs solicited and collected by the graduate coordinator for the meeting).

      Political Science

      • International Affairs (B.A.)

        Mission Statement

        Since Aristotle linked traditional inquiry into the political good with empirical comparison of governance, the systematic study of politics has been an integral part of the Western intellectual tradition. The study of politics is recognized as an essential component of a liberal arts preparation for citizenship and leadership in a democratic society. Indeed, the controversies that plague our society' and the world make the study of politics more important now than ever before.

        The International Affairs Program recognizes and embraces its distinctive roles, as defined by not only the liberal arts tradition of the College of Arts and Science in which it is located but by the land grant origins of the University of Nevada, Reno. At the heart of the department's mission is the pursuit of excellence in teaching, research and service.

        A core component of the Department's teaching mission is the education of informed, competent, and efficacious citizens. The Department fulfills this role through our International Affairs major and Latin America/Asian Studies minor programs; and through the participation of our faculty and graduate assistants in the delivery of the University's core curriculum. The Department encourages the pursuit of excellence in teaching in a number of ways. Excellence in teaching is recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. New faculty are mentored by more senior faculty. All faculty are urged to attend teaching improvement programs and seminars, both on and off campus.

        A core component of the Department's service mission is to provide service to the community. The Department recognizes the assumption of service arising from a land grant institution like UNR. The Department fulfills its service mission in multiple ways. Our faculty sit on numerous departmental, college, university and community boards and committees. Our faculty routinely give interviews to the media on current political issues; offer seminars and public speaking events to the public; and provide advanced training for public managers through our graduate programs. Our faculty engage in applied research designed to identify and cope with various public policy problems at all levels of government. Service efforts are recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. Faculty are encouraged to remain engaged in service activities. Opportunities to serve in Congressional, legislative and public service internships are provided to students. Many of our courses are offered at non-traditional times (evenings, weekends), as a convenience to non-traditional and non-degree-seeking students and the community at large.

        In pursuing our mission, the International Affairs Program resolves to:

        1. Offer high-quality undergraduate degree programs designed to provide students with the critical thinking and communication skills that will allow them to succeed after graduation;
        2. Conduct research that keeps faculty at the forefront of knowledge in the discipline, and contributes significantly to the needs of the state and the nation for theoretical and applied research.
        3. Provide a curriculum that gives students at all levels and in all programs an understanding of international and cross-cultural issues, as well as the creative skills to be lifelong learners who adapt and contribute to a world of continuous change.
        4. Promote opportunities for interdisciplinary curricula and research, cooperating with University research centers, other departments, and other universities.

        Program Outcomes

        1. International majors are expected to become informed and efficacious citizens.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • International student responses to relevant questions on UNR Alumni Survey.

        Assessment Method

        • Alumni survey variables: d22b@a,b,d,e,f

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking, writing and communication skills.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • International student responses to relevant questions on UNR Alumni Survey.
        Assessment Method
        • Alumni Survey variables: d22c@a,c,h

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of international systems, and issues.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • International Affairs student performance in introductory level classes.
        Assessment Method
        • Recurring student survey of grades in introductory level classes.
      • Political Science (B.A.)

        Mission Statement

        Since Aristotle linked traditional inquiry into the political good with empirical comparison of governance, the systematic study of politics has been an integral part of the Western intellectual tradition. The study of politics is recognized as an essential component of a liberal arts preparation for citizenship and leadership in a democratic society. Indeed, the controversies that plague our society' and the world make the study of politics more important now than ever before.

        The Political Science Department recognizes and embraces its distinctive roles, as defined by not only the liberal arts tradition of the College of Arts and Science in which it is located?but by the land grant origins of the University of Nevada, Reno. At the heart of the department?s mission is the pursuit of excellence in teaching, research and service.

        A core component of the Department's teaching mission is the education of informed, competent, and efficacious citizens. The Department fulfills this role through our Political Science major and minor programs; our three graduate programs; our participation in an interdisciplinary major in International Affairs; and through the participation of our faculty and graduate assistants in the delivery of the University's core curriculum. The Department encourages the pursuit of excellence in teaching in a number of ways. Excellence in teaching is recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. New faculty are mentored by more senior faculty. All faculty are urged to attend teaching improvement programs and seminars, both on and off campus.

        A core component of the Department's research mission is to conduct and disseminate research on timely, relevant and important topics across the discipline of political science.

        The research component of our mission recognizes the role that active research plays in supporting the overall curricular efforts of the Department, the College, and the University. The Department fulfills this role through a faculty engaged in individual and collaborative research efforts, the results of which have been widely published by academic presses and in political science journals across the spectrum. Faculty research is recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. Faculty are encouraged and supported in their research projects. Faculty attendance at national and international conferences is encouraged as well.

        A core component of the Department's service mission is to provide service to the community. The Department recognizes the assumption of service arising from a land grant institution like UNR. The Department fulfills its service mission in multiple ways. Our faculty sit on numerous departmental, college, university and community boards and committees. Our faculty routinely give interviews to the media on current political issues; offer seminars and public speaking events to the public; and provide advanced training for public managers through our graduate programs. Our faculty engage in applied research designed to identify and cope with various public policy problems at all levels of government. Service efforts are recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. Faculty are encouraged to remain engaged in service activities. Opportunities to serve in Congressional, legislative and public service internships are provided to students. Many of our courses are offered at non-traditional times (evenings, weekends), as a convenience to non-traditional and non-degree-seeking students and the community at large.

        In pursuing our mission, the Department of Political Science resolves to:

        1. Offer high-quality undergraduate degree programs designed to provide students with the critical thinking and communication skills that will allow them to succeed after graduation;
        2. Offer high-quality graduate degree programs through the Ph.D. level. These programs are designed to serve the need for highly trained specialists in the general area of policy analysis in both the public and private sectors, and to prepare graduate students for careers in higher education.
        3. Conduct research that keeps faculty at the forefront of knowledge in the discipline, and contributes significantly to the needs of the state and the nation for theoretical and applied research.
        4. Provide specific training for public administrators through curricular offerings, short-courses, and the Master?s of Public Administration and Ph.D. programs.
        5. Provide a curriculum that gives students at all levels and in all programs an understanding of international and cross-cultural issues, as well as the creative skills to be lifelong learners who adapt and contribute to a world of continuous change.
        6. Promote opportunities for interdisciplinary curricula and research, cooperating with University research centers, other departments, and other universities.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Political Science majors are expected to become informed and efficacious citizens.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • PSC student responses to relevant questions on UNR Alumni Survey.

        Assessment Method

        • Alumni survey variables: d22b@a,b,d,e,f

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking, writing and communication skills.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • PSC student responses to relevant questions on UNR Alumni Survey.
        Assessment Method
        • Alumni Survey variables:d22c@a,c,h

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of government systems, electoral processes, and public policy processes and outcomes.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • PSC student performance in introductory level classes.
        Assessment Method
        • Recurring student survey of class grades in introductory level courses in Political Science

        3. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of international systems, diversity and cross-cultural issues.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • PSC student responses to relevant questions on UNR's Alumni Survey.
        Assessment Method
        • Alumni Survey variables: d22b@a,c,d,e
      • Political Science (M.A.)

        Mission Statement

        Since Aristotle linked traditional inquiry into the political good with empirical comparison of governance, the systematic study of politics has been an integral part of the Western intellectual tradition. The study of politics is recognized as an essential component of a liberal arts preparation for citizenship and leadership in a democratic society. Indeed, the controversies that plague our society' and the world? make the study of politics more important now than ever before.

        The Political Science Department recognizes and embraces its distinctive roles, as defined by not only the liberal arts tradition of the College of Arts and Science in which it is located but by the land grant origins of the University of Nevada, Reno. At the heart of the department's mission is the pursuit of excellence in teaching, research and service.

        A core component of the Department's teaching mission is the education of informed, competent, and efficacious citizens. The Department fulfills this role through our Political Science major and minor programs; our three graduate programs; our participation in an interdisciplinary major in International Affairs; and through the participation of our faculty and graduate assistants in the delivery of the University's core curriculum. The Department encourages the pursuit of excellence in teaching in a number of ways. Excellence in teaching is recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. New faculty are mentored by more senior faculty. All faculty are urged to attend teaching improvement programs and seminars, both on and off campus.

        A core component of the Department's research mission is to conduct and disseminate research on timely, relevant and important topics across the discipline of political science.

        The research component of our mission recognizes the role that active research plays in supporting the overall curricular efforts of the Department, the College, and the University. The Department fulfills this role through a faculty engaged in individual and collaborative research efforts, the results of which have been widely published by academic presses and in political science journals across the spectrum. Faculty research is recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. Faculty are encouraged and supported in their research projects. Faculty attendance at national and international conferences is encouraged as well.

        A core component of the Department's service mission is to provide service to the community. The Department recognizes the assumption of service arising from a land grant institution like UNR. The Department fulfills its service mission in multiple ways. Our faculty sit on numerous departmental, college, university and community boards and committees. Our faculty routinely give interviews to the media on current political issues; offer seminars and public speaking events to the public; and provide advanced training for public managers through our graduate programs. Our faculty engage in applied research designed to identify and cope with various public policy problems at all levels of government. Service efforts are recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. Faculty are encouraged to remain engaged in service activities. Opportunities to serve in Congressional, legislative and public service internships are provided to students. Many of our courses are offered at non-traditional times (evenings, weekends), as a convenience to non-traditional and non-degree-seeking students and the community at large.

        In pursuing our mission, the Department of Political Science resolves to:

        1. Offer high-quality undergraduate degree programs designed to provide students with the critical thinking and communication skills that will allow them to succeed after graduation;
        2. Offer high-quality graduate degree programs through the Ph.D. level. These programs are designed to serve the need for highly trained specialists in the general area of policy analysis in both the public and private sectors, and to prepare graduate students for careers in higher education.
        3. Conduct research that keeps faculty at the forefront of knowledge in the discipline, and contributes significantly to the needs of the state and the nation for theoretical and applied research.
        4. Provide specific training for public administrators through curricular offerings, short-courses, and the Master's of Public Administration and Ph.D. programs.
        5. Provide a curriculum that gives students at all levels and in all programs an understanding of international and cross-cultural issues, as well as the creative skills to be lifelong learners who adapt and contribute to a world of continuous change.
        6. Promote opportunities for interdisciplinary curricula and research, cooperating with University research centers, other departments, and other universities.

        Program Outcomes

        1. All MA students are expected to become informed, effective and efficacious citizen.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Involvement in civic activities after graduation
        • Placement in civil service or related careers

        Assessment Method

        • Recurring student surveys
        • # students in civil service or related careers (of those who seek such careers)

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking, writing and communication skills that will enable them to succeed after graduation.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Job placement
        • Successful career paths as measured by Standard Occupational Industrial Code (SOIC)
        • Career advancement over time
        • Ph.D. program and professional schools admissions
        Assessment Method
        • Job placement statistics
        • SOIC Data Over Time
        • Career positions, salary ranges (over time)
        • Number of graduates who applied to Ph.D. or professional programs who were admitted.

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the field of the discipline in which they specialize.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Successful completion of comprehensive exam in speciality field.
        • Successful completion and defense of MA thesis or professional paper.
        Assessment Method
        • Percentage of students who pass exam on the first try.
        • Program of study committee evaluations of the quality of both the thesis or professional paper and its defense.
      • Political Science (Ph.D.)

        Mission Statement

        Since Aristotle linked traditional inquiry into the political good with empirical comparison of governance, the systematic study of politics has been an integral part of the Western intellectual tradition. The study of politics is recognized as an essential component of a liberal arts preparation for citizenship and leadership in a democratic society. Indeed, the controversies that plague our society' and the world make the study of politics more important now than ever before.
        The Political Science Department recognizes and embraces its distinctive roles, as defined by not only the liberal arts tradition of the College of Arts and Science in which it is located but by the land grant origins of the University of Nevada, Reno. At the heart of the department's mission is the pursuit of excellence in teaching, research and service.
        A core component of the Department?s teaching mission is the education of informed, competent, and efficacious citizens. The Department fulfills this role through our Political Science major and minor programs; our three graduate programs; our participation in an interdisciplinary major in International Affairs; and through the participation of our faculty and graduate assistants in the delivery of the University?s core curriculum. The Department encourages the pursuit of excellence in teaching in a number of ways. Excellence in teaching is recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. New faculty are mentored by more senior faculty. All faculty are urged to attend teaching improvement programs and seminars, both on and off campus.
        A core component of the Department's research mission is to conduct and disseminate research on timely, relevant and important topics across the discipline of political science.
        The research component of our mission recognizes the role that active research plays in supporting the overall curricular efforts of the Department, the College, and the University. The Department fulfills this role through a faculty engaged in individual and collaborative research efforts, the results of which have been widely published by academic presses and in political science journals across the spectrum. Faculty research is recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. Faculty are encouraged and supported in their research projects. Faculty attendance at national and international conferences is encouraged as well.
        A core component of the Department's service mission is to provide service to the community. The Department recognizes the assumption of service arising from a land grant institution like UNR. The Department fulfills its service mission in multiple ways. Our faculty sit on numerous departmental, college, university and community boards and committees. Our faculty routinely give interviews to the media on current political issues; offer seminars and public speaking events to the public; and provide advanced training for public managers through our graduate programs. Our faculty engage in applied research designed to identify and cope with various public policy problems at all levels of government. Service efforts are recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. Faculty are encouraged to remain engaged in service activities. Opportunities to serve in Congressional, legislative and public service internships are provided to students. Many of our courses are offered at non-traditional times (evenings, weekends), as a convenience to non-traditional and non-degree-seeking students and the community at large.
        In pursuing our mission, the Department of Political Science resolves to:
        1. Offer high-quality undergraduate degree programs designed to provide students with the critical thinking and communication skills that will allow them to succeed after graduation;
        2. Offer high-quality graduate degree programs through the Ph.D. level. These programs are designed to serve the need for highly trained specialists in the general area of policy analysis in both the public and private sectors, and to prepare graduate students for careers in higher education.
        3. Conduct research that keeps faculty at the forefront of knowledge in the discipline, and contributes significantly to the needs of the state and the nation for theoretical and applied research.
        4. Provide specific training for public administrators through curricular offerings, short-courses, and the Master's of Public Administration and Ph.D. programs.
        5. Provide a curriculum that gives students at all levels and in all programs an understanding of international and cross-cultural issues, as well as the creative skills to be lifelong learners who adapt and contribute to a world of continuous change.
        6. Promote opportunities for interdisciplinary curricula and research, cooperating with University research centers, other departments, and other universities.

        Program Outcomes

        1. All Ph.D. students are expected to become informed, effective and efficacious citizens.

        Performance Indicators

        • Involvement in civic activities after graduation
        • Placement in civil service

        Assessment Method

        • Recurring student surveys
        • # students in civil service or related careers (of those who seek such careers)

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1.  Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking, writing and communication skills that will enable them to succeed after graduation.

        Performance Indicators

        • Job placement
        • Successful career paths as measured by Standard Occupational Industrial Code (SOIC)
        • Career positions, salary ranges (over time)

        Assessment Method

        • Job placement statistics
        • SOIC Data Over Time
        • Recurring student surveys

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate an advanced understanding of the two fields of the discipline in which they specialize.

        Performance Indicators

        • Successful completion of comprehensive exams in speciality fields
        • Successful completion and defense of Ph.D. dissertation

        Assessment Method

        • Percentage of students who pass exam on the first try.
        • Program of study committee evaluations of the quality of both the dissertation and its defense
      • Public Administration & Policy (M.P.A.)

        Mission Statement

        Since Aristotle linked traditional inquiry into the political good with empirical comparison of governance, the systematic study of politics has been an integral part of the Western intellectual tradition. The study of politics is recognized as an essential component of a liberal arts preparation for citizenship and leadership in a democratic society. Indeed, the controversies that plague our society' and the world make the study of politics more important now than ever before.

        The Political Science Department recognizes and embraces its distinctive roles, as defined by not only the liberal arts tradition of the College of Arts and Science in which it is located but by the land grant origins of the University of Nevada, Reno. At the heart of the department's mission is the pursuit of excellence in teaching, research and service.

        A core component of the Department's teaching mission is the education of informed, competent, and efficacious citizens. The Department fulfills this role through our Political Science major and minor programs; our three graduate programs; our participation in an interdisciplinary major in International Affairs; and through the participation of our faculty and graduate assistants in the delivery of the University's core curriculum.

        The Department encourages the pursuit of excellence in teaching in a number of ways. Excellence in teaching is recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. New faculty are mentored by more senior faculty. All faculty are urged to attend teaching improvement programs and seminars, both on and off campus.

        A core component of the Department's research mission is to conduct and disseminate research on timely, relevant and important topics across the discipline of political science.

        The research component of our mission recognizes the role that active research plays in supporting the overall curricular efforts of the Department, the College, and the University. The Department fulfills this role through a faculty engaged in individual and collaborative research efforts, the results of which have been widely published by academic presses and in political science journals across the spectrum. Faculty research is recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. Faculty are encouraged and supported in their research projects. Faculty attendance at national and international conferences is encouraged as well.

        A core component of the Department's service mission is to provide service to the community. The Department recognizes the assumption of service arising from a land grant institution like UNR. The Department fulfills its service mission in multiple ways. Our faculty sit on numerous departmental, college, university and community boards and committees. Our faculty routinely give interviews to the media on current political issues; offer seminars and public speaking events to the public; and provide advanced training for public managers through our graduate programs. Our faculty engage in applied research designed to identify and cope with various public policy problems at all levels of government. Service efforts are recognized and rewarded in the annual evaluation and merit process. Faculty are encouraged to remain engaged in service activities. Opportunities to serve in Congressional, legislative and public service internships are provided to students. Many of our courses are offered at non-traditional times (evenings, weekends), as a convenience to non-traditional and non-degree-seeking students and the community at large.

        In pursuing our mission, the Department of Political Science resolves to:

        1. Offer high-quality undergraduate degree programs designed to provide students with the critical thinking and communication skills that will allow them to succeed after graduation;
        2. Offer high-quality graduate degree programs through the Ph.D. level. These programs are designed to serve the need for highly trained specialists in the general area of policy analysis in both the public and private sectors, and to prepare graduate students for careers in higher education.
        3. Conduct research that keeps faculty at the forefront of knowledge in the discipline, and contributes significantly to the needs of the state and the nation for theoretical and applied research.
        4. Provide specific training for public administrators through curricular offerings, short-courses, and the Master's of Public Administration and Ph.D. programs.
        5. Provide a curriculum that gives students at all levels and in all programs an understanding of international and cross-cultural issues, as well as the creative skills to be lifelong learners who adapt and contribute to a world of continuous change.
        6. Promote opportunities for interdisciplinary curricula and research, cooperating with University research centers, other departments, and other universities.

        Program Outcomes

        1. All MPA students are expected to become informed, effective and efficacious citizens.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Involvement in civic activities after graduation
        • Placement in civil service or related careers

        Assessment Method

        • Recurring student surveys
        • # students in civil service or related careers (of those who seek such careers)

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking, writing and communication skills that will enable them to succeed after graduation.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Job placement
        • Successful career paths as measured by Standard Occupational Industrial Code (SOIC)
        • Ph.D. Program and Professional School Admissions
        Assessment Method
        • Job placement statistics
        • SOIC Data Over Time
        • Number of graduates who applied to Ph.D. or professional programs who were admitted.

        2.  Students will be able to demonstrate thorough understanding of public administration and public policy processes and outcomes.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Successful completion of MPA comprehensive exam
        • Successful completion and defense of MPA thesis or professional paper.
        Assessment Method
        • Percentage of students who pass field exam on the first try.
        • Program of study committee evaluations of the quality of both the thesis or professional paper and its defense.

      School of Social Research and Justice Studies

      • Justice Management (M.J.M.)

        Mission Statement

        The Justice Management program provides an academic foundation for those seeking education or advancement in the varied fields associated with the administration of justice. The program offers three areas of concentration (Juvenile Justice Management, Adult Justice Management, and Executive Court and Agency Administration) and provides a large selection of courses allowing students to create a program of study unique to their interests and professional needs Educational opportunities greatly affect the continued improvement of the system. The Justice Management program is designed to provide an academic degree program that is national in scope and impact.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in the diagnosis and analysis of problems through techniques developed by the social, behavioral and natural sciences.

        Performance Indicators

        • Learn basics of theory and research relevant to the justice system.

        Assessment Method

        • Faculty assessment of course work performance and grades submitted for respective courses.

        2. Students will be able to conduct research and demonstrate problem solving skills.

        Performance Indicators

        • Working knowledge of research design, methodology, and communication skills necessary to independently conduct a research project related to policy development, program evaluation, or other justice-related issue. Develop skills to present research in a concise and professional written form.

        Assessment Method

        • Successful completion of course work in research, theory, management and law, as applied to the justice system. Successful completion of the professional paper or thesis.
      • Judicial Studies (M.J.S.)

        Mission Statement

        The Judicial Studies Program provides formal graduate level training for trial judges, juvenile and family court judges, and administrative judges. The graduate training is intended to integrate technical studies of the judiciary with academic studies in an effort to provide an intellectual assessment of the role of the American judiciary in today's society. The graduate course work examines elements of the judiciary through a multi-disciplinary approach that includes perspectives from the humanities, social, behavioral and natural sciences, as well as communication. The course work is intended to prepare sitting judges for the challenges facing the court system both today and in the future. The thesis requirement prepares judges to conduct and publish research applicable to the judiciary system.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in the diagnosis and analysis of problems through techniques developed by the social, behavioral and natural sciences.

        Performance Indicators

        • Apply theory and research techniques to legal setting.
        • Learn basics of theory and research.

        Assessment Method

        • Self-reporting solicited by department.
        • Faculty assessment of course work performance and grades submitted for respective courses.

        2. Students will be able to conduct research and demonstrate problem solving skills.

        Performance Indicators

        • Working knowledge of research design, methodology, & communications.
        • Develop skills to present research in a concise and professional written form.

        Assessment Method

        • Successful completion and defense of the master thesis.
        • Successful presentation of master's thesis.
      • Judicial Studies (Ph.D.)

        Mission Statement

        The Judicial Studies Program provides formal graduate level training for trial judges, juvenile and family court judges, and administrative judges. The graduate training is intended to integrate technical studies of the judiciary with academic studies in an effort to provide an intellectual assessment of the role of the American judiciary in today's society. The graduate course work examines elements of the judiciary through a multi-disciplinary approach that includes perspectives from the humanities, social, behavioral and natural sciences, as well as communication. The course work is intended to prepare sitting judges for the challenges facing the court system both today and in the future. The dissertation requirement prepares judges to conduct and publish research applicable to the judiciary system.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in the diagnosis and analysis of problems through techniques developed by the social, behavioral and natural sciences.

        Performance Indicators

        • Learn basics of theory and research.
        • Apply research results to the courtroom.

        Assessment Method

        • Faculty assessment of course work performance and grades submitted for respective courses.
        • Self-reporting solicited by department.

        2. Students will be able to conduct research and demonstrate problem solving skills.

        Performance Indicators

        • Apply research to legal setting.
        • Working knowledge of research design, methodology, communications and the skills necessary to independently conduct a research project.
        • Develop skills to present research in a concise and professional written form.

        Assessment Method

        • Self-reporting solicited by department.
        • Successful completion and defense of the dissertation.
        • Successful presentation of the dissertation.
      • Social Justice (Certificate)

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills to allow for the analysis of social justice issues.

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of both the complexity of  causes and the solutions to social justice issues.

        3.  Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of theoretical frameworks and methodologies that allow for a critical analysis of research in the area of social justice.

        4.  Students will be able to demonstrate competence in written and verbal communication skills that convey social justice issues to specific audiences in a variety of contexts.

        5.  Students will be able to demonstrate an ability to develop programs and policies for addressing injustice at the national, state and local levels.

      Sociology

      • Sociology B.A.

        Mission Statement

        The Department of Sociology is committed to excellence in teaching, research and service in the best tradition of a liberal arts education. The Department prides itself in providing a quality education to its majors, minors, and graduate students. It is also committed to serving the larger university community by participation in such programs as the Core Curriculum. Consistent with this mission are the following objectives:

        • Development of critical/analytical thinking
        • Rigorous training in quantitative and qualitative research methods
        • Analysis of social problems using a variety of sociological perspectives
        • Professional socialization toward social responsibility and service to the community
        • Fostering a critical awareness of diversity issues
        • Enhancement of written and verbal communication skills.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to make a connection between their personal experiences and public issues and are able to analyze social behavior or specific social events in their societal context.

        Assessment Method
        • Term papers
        • Student responses to evaluation survey
        • Senior thesis
        • Student evaluations
        • Examinations

        2. Students will be able to apply various sociological perspectives to understand social issues and are able to contrast and compare different sociological perspectives.

        Assessment Method
        • Term papers
        • Senior thesis
        • Student responses to evaluation survey
        • Examinations
      • Sociology M.A.

        Mission Statement

        The mission of the Sociology Master's program is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to master the discipline of sociology and its various subfields. The program is intended to develop students' critical thinking on matters that are key to the study of society and societal institutions through rigorous theoretical and methodological training. This includes exposure to classical and contemporary sociological theory, quantitative and qualitative methods of social research, and various substantive areas of social inquiry within sociology. Students who successfully complete this training are prepared to pursue further graduate-level training leading to a Ph.D. in the social sciences, or to enter professional careers that require knowledge of human relations and societal institutions.

        Program Outcomes

        1. Provide an intellectually stimulating learning environment that is characterized by effective instruction and a focus on student learning.

        Student Performance Indicators

        • Student evaluations

        Assessment Method

        • Survey of majors

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students will be able to demonstrate a critical understanding of society and social relations through various competing sociological perspectives.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Some students write an M.A. thesis (under Plan A) and do so under the supervision of a thesis chair and other committee members.
        • Student performance in team-taught core theory courses, as well as substantive courses in various sub-fields of sociology.
        • Some students take a series of comprehensive examinations (under Plan B), including theory , research methods, and a substantive area in sociology that the student has been studying with a faculty member in the department.
        Assessment Method
        • Writing of a thesis proposal and an M.A. thesis. Evaluation by a thesis committee led by its chair. Faculty feedback on the proposal and the thesis.
        • Examinations, research papers, and in class presentations provide feedback on the students' understanding of social phenomena.
        • Comprehensive examinations are read by department faculty members supplying the questions and are graded on the basis of the level of knowledge obtained on each question.

        2. Students will be able to demonstrate skills in the critical interpretation of research findings and their theoretical and practical applications.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Conduct research in conjunction with faculty, or for thesis
        • Students succeeding in finding professional employment in their chosen field of study in the public or private sector.
        Assessment Method
        • Survey of majors
        • Tracking students through alumni surveys regarding the relevance of sociology to the practical realities of professional employment.

      Theatre

      • Theatre B.A.

        Mission Statement

        The mission of the Bachelor of Arts Theatre Program is to expose undergraduate students to all aspects of theatre and help them to develop an understanding and appreciation of the arts and crafts of theatre and related fields. Students in the bachelor's degree program who are planning a career in theatre arts, theatre education, or related areas are expected to develop an aptitude for the discipline. Through academic and experiential training, advanced students will acquire the knowledge and skills essential to enter their chosen theatrical field in order to achieve their career objectives.

        Student Learning Outcomes

        1. Students emphasizing a technical theatre track will show marked improvement in the area of emphasis.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Student will have held at least 9 technical positions in the theatre shops and/or for Nevada Repertory Company and student productions by the time they reach graduation. Assignments will generally increase in level of responsibility as the student nears graduation.
        Assessment Method
        • Student progress is assessed at semi-annual meetings of the department faculty during which technical positions for each semester's productions are assigned.

        2. Students emphasizing a performance track will show marked improvement in the area of emphasis.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Students will have been cast in at least 9 Nevada Repertory Company productions. Roles will generally increase in size and/or difficulty and be varied in type as the student nears graduation.
        Assessment Method
        • Student progress is assessed at semi-annual auditions for each semester's productions.

        3. Students will be able to work effectively in teams to create theatrical productions and will have developed a demonstrable theatre work ethic.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Student will regularly participate in Nevada Repertory Company mainstage productions and demonstrate a high degree of commitment, dependability, and cooperation. The student will demonstrate the ability to be a responsible and effective team player when working on theatrical productions.
        Assessment Method
        • Ongoing student progress is assessed at semi-annual meetings of the department faculty for the purpose of assigning technical positions for each semester's productions. Semi-annual auditions similarly allow for the assessment of student progress in the performance arena. In addition, the faculty assesses student learning during the annual scholarship meeting.

        4. Students emphasizing a performance track will have a thorough knowledge of acting theory and competency in application of acting skills in audition and performance settings.

        Student Performance Indicators
        • Students will participate in at least one of two Nevada Repertory Company auditions per year and show marked improvement in preparation for and quality of auditions.
        Assessment Method
        • Theatre directing faculty will audit auditions and analyze the development of student performers. The assessment coordinator in conjunction with the faculty will generate a report outlining the strengths and weaknesses of audition techniques, character development, vocal work, movement, and the ability to work within particular genre and style.