College of Education assessment plans

Undergraduate

  • Human Development & Family Studies (B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the HDFS academic degree programs is to produce graduates who have appropriate information and skills for understanding and working with diverse individuals and families in today's environments, as well as provide a background in theory and research methodologies essential for pursuit of additional graduate education. Courses, practicum, and internship experiences provide students with knowledge and skills to 1) work in positions that improve the lives of individuals, families, and their communities; 2) critically evaluate and contribute to the improvement of theory, research and practice in the field; 3) utilize an accurate understanding of the interaction of the bio-psycho-social elements of human development, to educate and promote growth and acceptance of individuals across the lifespan within the varied contexts of their lived experiences, and with in-depth expertise in at least one developmental stage; and 4) integrate information on the processes of diverse family systems with current issues and conditions affecting families. The program emphasizes an understanding of the mutual influences of individuals, families, and their environments, as well as the application of ecological, systemic, and social constructionist approaches to dealing with problems or change. Students are expected to develop skills in recognizing strengths of all individuals and families, as well as an appreciation of diversity in age, race, and ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, learning styles, and abilities. The program recognizes that the distinction between prevention and intervention is not always clear, and encourages students to develop skills that bridge these areas.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will identify and describe the bio-psycho-social elements of the human lifespan, with emerging expertise in one developmental stage.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the bio-psycho-social elements of the human lifespan in HDFS 201 (Lifespan Human Development) by completing a cumulative final exam.
    • Students will demonstrate emerging expertise in one developmental stage of the lifespan through observation assignments in HDFS 431a, b, and/or c.

    Assessment Method

    • Descriptive statistics on student grades on cumulative final exam in HDFS 201.
    • Descriptive statistics on student grades on observation assignments in HDFS 431a, b, or c.
    • Student reflection in facilitated exit survey during HDFS 470 (internship course).
    • Field supervisor ratings of student knowledge during HDFS 470 (internship).

    2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the common elements of all families as well as the diversity of family life and structure in the United States.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students will demonstrate knowledge of families and application of that knowledge through completion of exams and a family interview assignment in HDFS 202 (Introduction to the Family).
    • Students will demonstrate in depth knowledge of generational family issues, family processes, and family diversity through assignments in HDFS 436 (Family Interaction) and in HDFS 438 (Children & Families in a Multicultural Society).

    Assessment Method

    • Student grades on family interview assignment in HDFS 202.
    • Students' grades on genogram assignment in HDFS 436.
    • Students' grades on the in-depth family study assignment in HDFS 438.
    • Field supervisor ratings of student knowledge during HDFS 470 (internship).
    • Student reflection in facilitated exit survey during HDFS 470.
    • Students' average exam grades in HDFS 202.

    3. Students will have multiple opportunities to demonstrate skills in oral and written communication in topics related to Human Development and Family Studies.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students will be given multiple opportunities to develop oral and written communication skills throughout the entire program.

    Assessment Method

    • Number of assignments required across all required HDFS courses that involve opportunities to hone oral and/or written communication skills.
    • Student reflection in facilitated exit survey during HDSF 470.
    • Field supervisor rating of oral and written communication.

    4. Students will be inchoate consumers of HDFS-relevant research and will demonstrate an understanding of prominent HDFS theories.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students will complete a survey capturing the experience and knowledge gained in HDFS 391 (Research Methods).
    • Students will demonstrate ability to apply knowledge gained regarding research and theory.

    Assessment Method

    • Results from survey given in HDFS 391.
    • Student reflection in facilitated exit survey during HDFS 470.
    • Field supervisor rating in HDFS 470

    5. Students will apply field-related knowledge, theory, and practices in professional settings.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students will accurately apply knowledge gained in professional settings in HDFS 231 (Practicum) and HDFS 470 (Internship).
    • Students demonstrate advanced skill in the application of field-related knowledge in a professional setting by working effectively with clients in a community agency or institution as part of their internship experience (HDFS 470).

    Assessment Method

    • Practicum teacher ratings in HDFS 231.
    • Field supervisor ratings in HDFS 470.
  • Secondary Education (B.A. and B.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning is to prepare beginning teachers who have a strong fund of knowledge, who engage in reflective practices, who love learning, and who value democracy and multiculturalism. All teacher education programs are accredited by the National Council for

    Accreditation of

    Teacher Education (NCATE). Outcomes are based on standards for beginning teachers from the Interstate New Teacher Assessment And Support Consortium (INTASC).

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1.

    Professionalism. The teacher candidate is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others and who actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally.

    The teacher candidate fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents/guardians, and agencies in the larger community to support students' learning and well-being. (INTASC Standards 9 & 10).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Student performance in practica
    • Student performance on critical events or activities that are contained in courses and practica throughout the program
    • Portfolio that contains program artifacts and reflection for each of the five standards. Portfolio is submitted as part of the application process for admission to internship
    • Student performance in internship
    • Professional Portfolio. This builds on previous portfolio by adding artifacts and reflection from internship including student learning sample. The student learning sample contains a unit lesson, performance data from participating children, and analysis and reflection on the lesson.

    Assessment Method

    • Faculty and lead teacher assessments on practica rubrics. See field experience manuals from secondary practica on the department web page under downloads
    • Rubrics have been developed for each of the critical events or activities included in different courses throughout the program (i.e., application to program in elementary and secondary undergraduate handbooks; portfolio one manuals, student learning sample manuals, advanced assessment in M.A./M.S. manual and in first time licensure manuals. See manuals on download page of the CTL website
    • Portfolio is reviewed by faculty members using rubrics for each of the standards. Rubrics are included as part of the elementary and secondary portfolio manuals located on the download section of the CTL website
    • University supervisor and cooperating teacher assessment on the internship evaluation form. The evaluation has specific rubrics for each skill. See supervisor manuals on the Office of Field Experience website
    • The university supervisor and the lead teacher review and evaluate the internship experience as part of the portfolio. Faculty from the department guide and evaluated the student learning sample (SLS) that is part of the internship portfolio. Rubrics and manuals are available on the Department of CTL webpage under downloads.

    2.

    Knowledge of Students. The teacher candidate understands how children learn and develop, as well as how they differ in their approaches to learning, and actively supports student learning (INTASC Standards 2, 3, & 10).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • The performance indicators are the same as for Outcome 1.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessments are the same as for Outcome 1.

    3.

    Knowledge of Subject Matter and Planning for Instruction. The teacher candidate demonstrates their knowledge of the discipline(s) and their ability to design and develop a curriculum for which students learn in meaningful ways (INTASC Standard 1, 3, & 7).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • The performance indicators are the same as for Outcome 1.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessments are the same as for Outcome 1.

    4.

    Delivery and Management of Instruction. The teacher candidate plans and uses a variety of instructional materials, demonstrates knowledge of group and individual motivation, as well as effective verbal and nonverbal communication to create a positive and effective learning environment (INTASC Standards 4,5, 6, & 7).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • The performance indicators are the same as for Outcome 1.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessments are the same as for Outcome 1.

    5.

    Assessment. Teacher candidates know, understand, and use formal and informal assessment strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that promotes continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of each student (INTASC Standard 2, 8, & 9).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • The performance indicators are the same as for Outcome 1.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessments are the same as for Outcome 1.

Graduate

  • Counseling & Educational Psychology (M.A. and M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology is a component of Nevada's Land Grant University located in the College of Education. Master's, educational specialist, and doctoral degrees are offered in counseling and educational psychology. Master's degrees include emphases in college student development/counseling in higher education, community counseling, marital, couple, & family counseling/therapy, school counseling, educational psychology, and information technology in education. The educational specialist degree consists of an emphasis in community counseling, marital, couple, & family counseling/therapy, school counseling, and school psychology. Individual elective courses also are offered that provide knowledge and skills in research and statistics and in most other areas of counseling and educational psychology. In performing its mission, the Counseling and Educational Psychology Department:

    1. Offers quality graduate programs in counseling and in educational psychology, with emphases in college student development/counseling in higher education, community counseling, marital, couple, & family counseling/therapy, school counseling, educational psychology, and information technology in education. to meet the needs of the citizens of Nevada.
    2. Emphasizes research and scholarly activities that contribute to the advancement and dissemination of knowledge.
    3. Offers course work that supports undergraduate education.
    4. Offers community and public service programs.
    5. Strives to reflect the ethnic and cultural diversity of the citizens of Nevada.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Counseling students will have an understanding of essential counseling skills.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students enrolled in CEP 795 will demonstrate counseling competency on a 60 minute counseling session DVD

    Assessment Method

    • Students will select a five minute running portion from the first twenty minutes, second twenty minutes, and third twenty minutes of the 60 minutes session and edit it into a 15 minute DVD. The CEP faculty members will review the tape and evaluate it across a 6 dimension Likert-type scale, and faculty scores will be evaluated to determine inter-rater reliability.

    2. Students will understand and use theories of human growth and development for facilitating client problem solving and growth.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students will be able to describe theories of human growth and development
    • Students will be able to assess and address client problems through using a human growth and development theory

    Assessment Method

    • A human growth and development essay that describes how to apply a theory will be evaluated by a faculty member with regard to its accuracy
    • Student will submit a case study that accurately assesses a client's problems using a human growth and development theory. This case study will be evaluated by a faculty member who teaches CEP 705 for determining its effectiveness

    3. Counseling students will have a fund of knowledge based upon the standards for competency set forth by the Council for Accrediting Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students will demonstrate competency of the CACREP core areas:
      1. Professional Identity
      2. Social and Cultural Diversity
      3. Human Growth and Development
      4. Career Development
      5. Helping Relationships
      6. Group Work
      7. Assessment
      8. Research and Program Evaluation

    Assessment Method

    • Students will take and pass the 136-item national CPCE examination, administered by the National Board of Certified Counselors. The passing score is set by national norming standards.

    4. Students will be reflective in their understanding and practice of counseling.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students will demonstrate an incisive and personal understanding of various counseling theories.

    Assessment Method

    • As part of each student's Comprehensive Examination, students will write a 7-9 page paper (minimum) that:
      1. outlines a particular theory deemed meaningful to their practice; and
      2. describe and discuss the relevancy of the theoretical constructs to the student's practice of counseling as well as in relation to the tape.
  • Educational Leadership (M.A. and M.Ed.)

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Educational Leadership Program is to develop and enhance skills, attitudes, and values critical in administrative leadership. Our students will be well prepared to be educational leaders in public schools or higher education institutions.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Educational Leadership graduates are expected to be able promote the success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Completion of projects, activities, reports and papers in EL graduate courses related to collaborative and community leadership (700 & 715).
    • Completion of one significant project under this learning outcome during the internship experience (EL 798).
    • National professional examination.
    • Graduate feedback.

    Assessment Method

    • Internship supervisor and faculty supervisor will rate all aspects of the student's experience in collaborative and community leadership to determine if awarding the degree is appropriate or any need for remediation.
    • Exceeding the established "cut" score for Nevada on the ETS Praxis exam: Administration and Supervision.
    • Conducting follow-up interviews/surveys with program completers and their supervisors using the critical incident technique to determine the graduate's readiness in collaborative and community leadership.

    2. Educational Leadership graduates are expected promote the success of all students by advocating , nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Completion of projects, activities, papers, reports and other learning activities in EL instructional leadership courses (700, 703, 715, & 746).
    • Completion of one significant project under this learning outcome during the internship experience (EL 798).
    • National professional examination.
    • Graduate feedback.

    Assessment Method

    • Internship supervisor and faculty supervisor will rate all aspects of the student's experience as an instructional leader to determine if awarding the degree is appropriate or make any decisions regarding remediation.
    • Exceeding the established "cut" score for Nevada on the ETS Praxis exam: Administration and Supervision.
    • Conducting follow-up interviews/surveys with program completers and their supervisors using the critical incident technique to determine the graduate's readiness in collaborative and community leadership.

    3. Educational Leadership graduates are expected to be able promote the success of all students by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Completion of projects, activities, reports, and other learning activities in EL management courses (701,735, and 726).
    • Completion of one significant project under this learning outcome during the internship experience (EL 798).
    • National professional examination.
    • Graduate feedback.

    Assessment Method

    • Internship supervisor and faculty supervisor will rate all aspects of the student's experience as an instructional leader to determine if awarding the degree is appropriate or make any decisions regarding remediation.
    • Exceeding the established "cut" score for Nevada on the ETS Praxis exam: Administration and Supervision.
    • Conducting follow-up interviews/surveys with program completers and their supervisors using the critical incident technique to determine the graduate's readiness in collaborative and community leadership.

    4. Educational Leadership graduates are expected to promote the success of every student by collaborating with faculty and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Completion of one significant project under this learning outcome during the internship experience (EL 798).
    • Completion of projects, activities, papers, reports and other learning activities in EL instructional leadership courses (700, 703, 743, & 746).
    • National professional examination.
    • Graduate feedback.

    Assessment Method

    • Internship supervisor and faculty supervisor will rate all aspects of the student's experience as an instructional leader to determine if awarding the degree is appropriate or make any decisions regarding remediation.
    • Exceeding the established "cut" score for Nevada on the ETS Praxis exam: Administration and Supervision.
    • Conducting follow-up interviews/surveys with program completers and their supervisors using the critical incident technique to determine the graduate's readiness in collaborative and community leadership.

    5. Educational Leadership graduates are expected to promote the success of every student by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Completion of projects, activities, papers, reports and other learning activities in EL instructional leadership courses (734 & 735).
    • Completion of one significant project under this learning outcome during the internship experience (EL 798).
    • National professional examination.
    • Graduate feedback.

    Assessment Method

    • Internship supervisor and faculty supervisor will rate all aspects of the student's experience as an instructional leader to determine if awarding the degree is appropriate or make any decisions regarding remediation.
    • Exceeding the established "cut" score for Nevada on the ETS Praxis exam: Administration and Supervision.
    • Conducting follow-up interviews/surveys with program completers and their supervisors using the critical incident technique to determine the graduate's readiness in collaborative and community leadership.

    6. Educational Leadership graduates are expected to promote the success of every student by understanding, responding to, and influencing the political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Graduate feedback.
    • Completion of projects, activities, papers, reports and other learning activities in EL instructional leadership courses (726, 734, & 735).
    • Completion of one significant project under this learning outcome during the internship experience (EL 798).
    • National professional examination.

    Assessment Method

    • Conducting follow-up interviews/surveys with program completers and their supervisors using the critical incident technique to determine the graduate's readiness in collaborative and community leadership.
    • Internship supervisor and faculty supervisor will rate all aspects of the student's experience as an instructional leader to determine if awarding the degree is appropriate or make any decisions regarding remediation.
    • Exceeding the established "cut" score for Nevada on the ETS Praxis exam: Administration and Supervision.
  • Equity & Diversity in Educational Settings (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The master's program in Equity and Diversity in Education (EDE) is designed to offer advanced study on use of inclusive methods to serve diverse learners in the classroom and beyond. This program allows educators and those in related fields to enhance their knowledge, skills, and dispositions to work more effectively with individuals from diverse backgrounds. Multiple dimensions of human diversity are addressed through the program's course work, with special attention to gender, race/ethnicity, national origin, language, social class, and exceptionality.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Outcome 1 (Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions): Graduates will demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions appropriate to equity and diversity in education.

    Performance Indicators

    • Graduates will present ideas and perspectives that are appropriate to equity and diversity in education.
    • Graduates will display accurate and substantial understanding of major concepts in the field.
    • Graduates will support their work with citations, explanation, and examples.
    • Graduates will frame their work within inclusive perspectives.

    Assessment Method

    The two main faculty members who oversee this program will collaboratively determine each student's score on the scoring rubric found at the bottom of this document. The assessment will be based on a literature-review paper completed during EDS 795, the course guiding the comprehensive project, which is completed near the end of each student's program.

    Outcome 2 (Research-Based Practice): Graduates will show an ability to apply research and theory to practice.

    Performance Indicators

    • Graduates will demonstrate an ability to apply appropriate equity and diversity knowledge and skills to education or related practice.
    • Graduates will prepare a useful, research-based product for an appropriate audience.

    Assessment Method

    The two main faculty members who oversee this program will collaboratively determine each student's score on the scoring rubric found at the bottom of this document. The assessment will be based on a research-based practical product completed during EDS 795, the course guiding the comprehensive project, which is completed near the end of each student's program.

    Outcome 3 (Scholarly Writing): Graduates will display scholarly writing skills that are culturally sensitive and mechanically correct.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Graduates will locate, critically analyze, and accurately report recent, high-quality professional literature from varied authors and sources.
    • Graduates will synthesize sources within subheadings appropriate to the topic.
    • Graduates will present language and ideas that are sensitive to and respectful of human diversity.
    • Graduates will produce visually neat written products that are clear, cohesive, well sequenced, mechanically correct, formatted properly, and prepared according to task guidelines.

    Assessment Method

    The two main faculty members who oversee this program will collaboratively determine each student's score on the scoring rubric found at the bottom of this document. The assessment will be based on a combined literature-review paper and research-based practical product completed during EDS 795, the course guiding the comprehensive project, which is completed near the end of each student's program.

  • Gifted & Talented Education (Certificate)

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. As a collaborative team, students will be able to use the backward lesson design paired with project-based learning to scaffold a curriculum guided by essential questions, meaningful content and assessment that meets the unique intellectual, academic, and social-emotional needs of gifted learners.
    2. Students will be able to collaborate with a partner or a triad to design and present an overview of a workshop and at least one structured activity that would be appropriate to share with pre-service teachers on a specific area related to helping the participants understand the needs and characteristics of gifted and talented students.
    3. Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of data and how it relates to gifted students by structuring a data resource packet that helps parents, teachers, key stakeholders and where appropriate students understand and engage in a discussion on data findings and next steps.
    4. Students will be able to create a resource guide for parents that provides resources for meeting the unique intellectual, academic, and social-emotional needs of gifted learners in their content area.
  • Human Development & Family Studies (M.S.)

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the HDFS academic degree programs is to produce graduates who have appropriate information and skills for understanding and working with diverse individuals and families in today's environments, as well as provide a background in theory and research methodologies essential for pursuit of additional graduate education. Courses, practicum, and internship experiences provide students with knowledge and skills to:

    1. work in positions that improve the lives of individuals, families, and their communities;
    2. critically evaluate and contribute to the improvement of theory, research and practice in the field;
    3. utilize an accurate understanding of the interaction of the bio-psycho-social elements of human development, to educate and promote growth and acceptance of individuals across the lifespan within the varied contexts of their lived experiences, and with in-depth expertise in at least one developmental stage; and
    4. integrate information on the processes of diverse family systems with current issues and conditions affecting families.

    The program emphasizes an understanding of the mutual influences of individuals, families, and their environments, as well as the application of ecological, systemic, and social constructionist approaches to dealing with problems or change. Students are expected to develop skills in recognizing strengths of all individuals and families, as well as an appreciation of diversity in age, race, and ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, learning styles, and abilities. The program recognizes that the distinction between prevention and intervention is not always clear, and encourages students to develop skills that bridge these areas.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1.; Demonstrate professional-level competency in either human development or family studies, with in-depth knowledge in both areas of expertise.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students are able to effectively use their expertise to serve the community, solve problems, consult, teach, and/or conduct research

    Assessment Method

    • Faculty evaluation of this specific competency as part of the grade for papers and/or projects completed in HDFS 720 or 730; 745; and 771.
    • Thesis: Successful defense of the thesis or professional paper.

    2.; Demonstrate ability to find and use various sources of information available to professionals in order to stay current with new practices and knowledge in the field.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students are able to find and use HDFS-related sources of information on current knowledge and practice.
    • Students are able to use theory to:
      1. integrate, organize, and interpret information and knowledge;
      2. guide current practice in the field

    Assessment Method

    • Students provide an annotated bibliography for papers completed in HDFS 720 or 730, 745, and 771.
    • Faculty evaluation of student performance in written papers and oral presentations required in HDFS 720 or 730; 740; and 771.
    • Thesis: Successful defense of thesis or professional paper

    3.; Demonstrate extensive knowledge and application of research processes and related ethical issues, in both qualitative and quantitative research.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of qualitative and/or quantitative research designs
    • Students demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate their scholarship to the scientific community
    • Students demonstrate the ability to conduct rigorous and ethical research

    Assessment Method

    • Faculty evaluation of students' performance as research assistants and/or as students in HDFS 771.
    • Thesis: Successful defense of thesis or professional paper
    • Refereed publications and presentations of scholarship by students.
  • Literacy Studies (M.Ed.)

    Mission Statement

    The Online Master's Program at the University of Nevada, Reno offers licensed teachers the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge in the area of Literacy Studies. The online Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree is a rigorous academic curriculum intended for the practicing educator. The degree focuses on research-based literacy instruction from the perspective of Multiple Literacies. Literacy in contemporary society is undergoing change as a result of social, cultural, economic, and technological practices and advances.

    As a result of these changes, literacy encompasses many new ways of reading and writing; literate practices are not limited to print decoding or cognitive strategies used for comprehension or composition.

    Educators in modern society must attend to the myriad and complex ways that social groups construct and disseminate meanings through new and evolving literate practices.

    The online master's program places special emphasis on the many literacies used in modern society and assumes a critical perspective about relationships between literacies and empowerment in a multicultural and pluralistic world.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Demonstrate foundational knowledge of literacy, literacy development, and multiple literacies.

    Performance Indicators

    During the final grading period for each course, instructors will complete the SLO rubric to evaluate whether students have fully, partially, or failed to meet the SLO supported by the summative assessment for that course. For the comprehensive exam, which includes an oral and written component, the exam committee will complete the exam rubric.

    Assessment Methods

    Three courses, in particular, include assessments that match Outcome 1: EDRL 600: Foundations of Literacy (midterm exam and final paper), EDRL 771e: Multiple Literacies (midterm exam and final paper), EDS 795: Comprehensive Exam (final professional paper and oral presentation). In addition, selected elective courses will provide opportunities for students to deepen their foundational knowledge of literacy.

    2. Demonstrate use of assessment, curricular, and instructional knowledge to determine and meet the literacy needs of socioeconomically, linguistically, and culturally diverse students.

    Performance Indicators

    During the final grading period for each course, instructors will complete the SLO rubric* to evaluate whether students have fully, partially, or failed to meet the SLO supported by the summative assessment for that course.

    Assessment Methods

    Two courses, in particular, include assessments that match Outcome 2: EDRL 700: Literacy Assessment (final case study report from assessment practicum and final exam) and EDRL 701: Field Work and Clinical Practice in Reading (final case study report from tutoring practicum and final exam). In addition, understanding and supporting diverse students is a common thread in many courses. Students will have multiple opportunities to demonstrate their learning in this area, and they will be assessed with a common question during the oral presentation of the comprehensive exam.

    3. Demonstrate scholarly abilities, specifically the abilities to: understand leading research articles on a wide variety of literacy topics, synthesize literacy research and write well-crafted academic papers, and apply literacy research to classroom practice.

    Performance Indicators

    During the final grading period for each course, instructors will complete the SLO rubric* to evaluate whether students have fully, partially, or failed to meet the SLO supported by the summative assessment for that course. For the comprehensive exam, which includes an oral and written component, the exam committee will complete the exam rubric.*

    Assessment Methods

    Three courses, in particular, include assessments that match Outcome 3: EDUC 770: Masters Seminar (midterm exam and final paper), EDRL 771h: Critical Literacy (midterm exam and final paper), and EDS 795: Comprehensive Exam (final professional paper and oral presentation). In addition, the required educational research course (EDRS 700) and selected elective courses will provide opportunities for students to deepen their scholarly abilities with literacy research.

  • Secondary Education (M.Ed.)

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning is to prepare beginning teachers who have a strong fund of knowledge, who engage in reflective practices, who love learning, and who value democracy and multiculturalism. All teacher education programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation ofTeacher Education (NCATE). Outcomes are based on standards for beginning teachers from the Interstate New Teacher Assessment And Support Consortium (INTASC).

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Professionalism. The teacher candidate is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others and who actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally. The teacher candidate fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents/guardians, and agencies in the larger community to support students' learning and well-being. (INTASC Standards 9 & 10).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Student performance in practica
    • Student performance on critical events or activities that are contained in courses and practica throughout the program
    • Portfolio that contains program artifacts and reflection for each of the five standards. Portfolio is submitted as part of the application process for admission to internship
    • Student performance in internship
    • Professional Portfolio. This builds on previous portfolio by adding artifacts and reflection from internship including student learning sample. The student learning sample contains a unit lesson, performance data from participating children, and analysis and reflection on the lesson.

    Assessment Method

    • Faculty and lead teacher assessments on practica rubrics. See field experience manuals from secondary practica on the department web page under downloads
    • Rubrics have been developed for each of the critical events or activities included in different courses throughout the program (i.e., application to program in elementary and secondary undergraduate handbooks; portfolio one manuals, student learning sample manuals, advanced assessment in M.A./M.S. manual and in first time licensure manuals. See manuals on download page of the CTL website
    • Portfolio is reviewed by faculty members using rubrics for each of the standards. Rubrics are included as part of the elementary and secondary portfolio manuals located on the download section of the CTL website
    • University supervisor and cooperating teacher assessment on the internship evaluation form. The evaluation has specific rubrics for each skill. See supervisor manuals on the Office of Field Experience website
    • The university supervisor and the lead teacher review and evaluate the internship experience as part of the portfolio. Faculty from the department guide and evaluated the student learning sample (SLS) that is part of the internship portfolio. Rubrics and manuals are available on the Department of CTL webpage under downloads.

    2. Knowledge of Students. The teacher candidate understands how children learn and develop, as well as how they differ in their approaches to learning, and actively supports student learning (INTASC Standards 2, 3, & 10).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • The performance indicators are the same as for Outcome 1.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessments are the same as for Outcome 1.

    3. Knowledge of Subject Matter and Planning for Instruction. The teacher candidate demonstrates their knowledge of the discipline(s) and their ability to design and develop a curriculum for which students learn in meaningful ways (INTASC Standard 1, 3, & 7).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • The performance indicators are the same as for Outcome 1.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessments are the same as for Outcome 1.

    4. Delivery and Management of Instruction. The teacher candidate plans and uses a variety of instructional materials, demonstrates knowledge of group and individual motivation, as well as effective verbal and nonverbal communication to create a positive and effective learning environment (INTASC Standards 4,5, 6, & 7).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • The performance indicators are the same as for Outcome 1.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessments are the same as for Outcome 1.

    5. Assessment. Teacher candidates know, understand, and use formal and informal assessment strategies to plan, evaluate and strengthen instruction that promotes continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of each student (INTASC Standard 2, 8, & 9).

    Student Performance Indicators

    • The performance indicators are the same as for Outcome 1.

    Assessment Method

    • The assessments are the same as for Outcome 1.
  • Special Education (M.Ed.)

    Mission Statement

    The mission of the Special Education Masters Program in the College of Education is to prepare master teachers and service providers who have a strong fund of knowledge, who engage in reflective practices, who love learning, and who value democracy and multiculturalism. All teacher education programs are accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Outcomes at the master's level are based on standards developed by the program and reflect those of the Council for Exceptional Children.

    Student Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will acquire the skills and knowledge to be a master teachers in their discipline.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Following an approved program of study, students will complete all of their courses with a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

    Assessment Method

    • Regular review of student GPA by advisor and graduate school

    2. Students will be able to critically think and write about major issues in their discipline.

    Student Performance Indicators

    • Successful completion of written comprehensive examination, an applied project, an advanced portfolio, or a thesis, evaluated in five domains.

    Assessment Method

    • Advisory/Examining Committee members evaluate the student's project, based on a rubric covering the 5 Advanced Domains. More information about the culminating experience requirements can be found at: http://www.unr.edu/educ/eds/programs/culminating_masters.html