Geography Department's Douglas Boyle appointed new Nevada State Climatologist

Heads State Climate Office in College of Science public service department

7/17/2012 - By: Mike Wolterbeek
state climatologist doug boyle New Nevada State Climatologist Doug Boyle is a faculty member in the geography department. Photo by Jean Dixon.

Douglas Boyle is Nevada's new state climatologist. He will oversee operations of the Nevada State Climate Office, a public-service department in the College of Science at the University of Nevada, Reno.

The state climatologist and the Nevada Climate Office collect, maintain and interpret Nevada's climate and weather data information, publish a quarterly report and provide leadership on climatic hazards and drought planning in the state through work and consultation with the governor's office and state agencies. The University of Nevada, Reno has strong ties with the Western Regional Climate Center and the Reno office of the National Weather Service.

"I look forward to working with decision makers, the agencies, the public and students of all ages, bringing the climatology to the community through all of our efforts," Boyle said. "We can look at the distant past, recent past, present and the future to keep Nevada informed about climate and weather using the most current science."

As a member in the state's Drought Response Committee, along with the Division of Water Resources and Division of Emergency Management, Boyle will be instrumental in providing climate and weather data and advice to the governor's office during times of drought.

The State Climate Office has a strong outreach program throughout the state with many opportunities for community interaction. They conduct presentations to service groups and K-12 classrooms around the state, help observers set up and maintain weather sites as well as service the statewide network of weather stations. Boyle said he will be exploring new ways to approach what the Nevada Climate Office does for the community, making it more open and efficient.

"Doug has a strong research record in the dynamics of climate, especially in the Great Basin," Jeff Thompson, dean of the College of Science, said. "I'm sure he'll be very engaging and collaborative with our partners and publics throughout the state."

Boyle is also a paleoclimate modeler and a Department of Geography associate professor in the Mackay School of Earth Sciences and Engineering. He is a watershed hydrologist with more than 20 years of experience in the development, implementation and evaluation of complex computer-based models of surface and groundwater hydrologic systems in arid and semi-arid environments, including the Great Basin, the Tibetan Plateau and areas of South America


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