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'Wolf Pack Welcome' weekend: 'The best is yet to come'

8/24/2009 - By: Natalie Savidge
welcome Melissa Castaldy, a freshman from Reno, takes a break outside Nye Hall from moving in her room on Friday, Aug. 21. Photo by Jean Dixon

The residence hall complex was a beehive of activity Friday as hundreds of the newest University of Nevada, Reno students, along with their parents, siblings, grandparents and friends, unloaded carloads of belongings and packed them into their new living quarters.

More than 1,700 students moved into the University’s residence halls over the weekend in preparation for Monday’s first day of classes for the 2009 fall semester.

“I’m in the same dorm and on the same floor my dad was on when he went to school here,” beamed accelerated medical program freshman Jake Sorensen of Boulder City. “That is so cool.”

Dozens of returning students active in Greek Life and other clubs and organization were on-hand to help with the task of lugging in the necessities of residence hall life, including pillows, blankets, microwaves and mini-refrigerators.

Sentiments of thanks and enthusiasm were heard from many.

“You guys are awesome, thank you,” said one busy, new resident.

“My daughter is patiently waiting in line to check into her dorm room,” said Drew Betts, father of freshman Devin Betts from Livermore, Calif. “We’ve had many family members attend the University of Nevada and she is excited to be going here.”

“Excited” was the expression of the day. University President Milton Glick walked through and greeted parents and students moving into Canada, Nye and Argenta Halls Friday morning, asking those he met if they were excited. Each responded they were.

In remarks made as part of Saturday morning’s traditional Opening Ceremony program at Lawlor Events Center, ASUN President Eli Reilly recalled his own sense of excitement as he moved into the residence halls four years ago. Yet, he reminded incoming freshmen that no matter how exciting move-in weekend, “The best is yet to come.”

“One minute you are moving into the residence halls and it seems the next you are filing for graduation,” Reilly said.

“Live and experience like never before,” Reilly said of the opportunities ahead. “When you walk across the stage for graduation, have no regrets.”

Both Reilly and keynote speaker David Ake, associate professor of music and dance and past winner of the F. Donald Tibbitts University Distinguished Teacher Award, encouraged new students to take full advantage of the university experience: attend lectures, exhibits, plays and performances; get involved in clubs and organizations; spend time and study on campus; utilize the resources of the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center; and attend athletic events and cheer on the Wolf Pack teams.

“You now have a job,” Ake said. “Starting Monday you will be a college student, hopefully a full-time college student.”

Ake encouraged the students to fully participate in the classroom experience.

“You wouldn’t have made it this far if you brought nothing to the table,” he said.

Reminding the audience that there is a difference between listening and hearing, Ake urged the new students to enhance their learning experience by listening.

“Listen critically, which does not mean to criticize, but rather to measure what’s being said to you against what you knew from before,” he said. “Weigh, honestly and fairly, the arguments presented to you in all of your classes, and reconsider your own position in light of those arguments.  That’s real learning. And, I might add, it’s also the foundation of being a responsible citizen.”

Throughout the Opening Ceremony program, the series of presenters welcomed students as the Class of 2013. “It’s not casual that we describe you as the Class of 2013,” Glick said during his remarks.

Glick encouraged the incoming class to set their sights on graduating in four or possibly five years, reminding them that careful planning and taking a full-load of courses are keys to a timely graduation. He also noted that the University offers considerable academic support systems and resources to help.

Back at the residence halls, incoming students began to see a glimpse at the support and resources available. Various University departments set up informational booths, some with free food and giveaways, others with important campus-life information like Parking and Transportation Services, the ASUN Bookstore, Wolf Card services, Food Services and more.

Residential Life Associate Director Jerome Maese was pleased with the weekend’s first move-in day.

“We are checking students in by floor, we have tremendous staff and student volunteers, and everyone is willing to chip in and help,” Maese said. “It couldn’t be going smoother.”

More than 3,000 incoming freshman will attend the University this fall as part of the anticipated total enrollment of nearly 17,000 students.


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