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ENGR 630 Wind Energy

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Return to the Graduate Certificate in Renewable Energy program description.

Introduction to wind energy and the development of the wind power industry.

About the Course

This course begins with an introduction to the history and development of the wind power industry. Students will learn where wind energy is used today and the technology employed. Important issues that will be discussed are the impacts as well as the benefits of this form of environmentally sustainable energy. The course ends with an analysis of where wind energy is headed. The course will focus on the use of case studies to illustrate principles of wind energy.

Learning Objectives

Course Objectives

  1. Students will gain an understanding of why we consider the use of wind energy to be a sustainable future energy.
  2. Students will gain knowledge of how wind turbines have been improved.
  3. Students will learn the historical and societal perspectives regarding the use of wind turbines for mechanical and electrical power generation for renewable energy.
  4. Students will learn about the meteorological aspects of wind energy.
  5. Students will develop an awareness of the significance of the environmental, political, and economics issues associated with wind power.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:

  1. Defend the use of wind energy as a sustainable future energy.
  2. Describe how wind turbines have been improved in reliability and performance.
  3. Describe the historical and societal perspectives regarding the use of wind turbines for mechanical and electrical power generation for renewable energy.
  4. Discuss the meteorological aspects of wind energy.
  5. Discuss the significance of the environmental, political, and economics issues associated with wind power.

Instructors

Guadalupe Paredes-Miranda, Ph.D., gpepami@yahoo.com

Lupita Paredes-Miranda received her M.S. and Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Nevada, Reno and a bachelor's degree in physics from the University National Autonomous of Mexico (UNAM).

She has taught Introduction to Atmospheric Meteorology at the University, and made extensive use of WebCampus for delivering portions of her course. Her research is associated with the role of atmospheric aerosol in air pollution, atmospheric radiation transfer, and cloud properties.

Patrick Arnott, Ph.D., patarnott@gmail.com

Dr. Arnott holds a B.S. in physics from the University of Southern Colorado, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from Washington State University. His current research involves development and use of novel instruments for particulate air pollution measurements in the atmosphere, and he holds two patents associated with various instrument designs. These patents have been licensed by Droplet Measurement Technology.

Dr Arnott has 23 years of experience teaching physics and atmospheric science courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level, and he is currently the director of the undergraduate Atmospheric Science Program at the University. He is also a member of the graduate faculty in both physics and atmospheric science.

Dr. Arnott's postdoctoral research involved numerical simulation and experiments for novel thermoacoustic refrigerators that use simple climate-benign gases like Helium and Helium/Xenon mixtures. These gases do not destroy the ozone layer or contribute to global warming as do common refrigerants like chlorofluorocarbons.

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