Entrepreneurship


Overview


"Developing entrepreneurial talent by developing real businesses"

Sontag winners

Undergraduate Minor

The entrepreneurship minor is open to all students at the university, purposefully designed without pre-requisites so any student can complement their major with entrepreneurial training.  A tailored version of the minor is available for management majors.

Learn more about the entrepreneurship minor.

MBA Area of Emphasis

Graduate students enrolled in the Masters of Business Administration program have the option to pursue an emphasis in entrepreneurship. Students can choose 9 credits from the five classes currently offered.

More information on the emphasis is available on the MBA degree listing.


Participating
Faculty

Faculty from throughout Nevada's College of Business participate in the various entrepreneurship programs. Learn more about the entrepreneurship instructors.


Academic
Advising

Students seeking to declare a minor in entrepreneurship or help with academic advising should contact Dr. Mark Pingle.


Curriculum


(Skip to minor tailored to management majors or MBA emphasis)

The entrepreneurship minor is open to all students at the university, purposefully designed without pre-requisites so any student can  complement their major with entrepreneurial training. The  program seeks to provide the student with fundamental  entrepreneurial skills, enhancing the student's ability to one day  open and operate a business.

Entrepreneurship Minor Advisor: Professor Mark Pingle; AB 319C; pingle@unr.edu; 784-6634.

Credits: The minor includes 18 total credits. There are three required courses, comprising 9 credits. The remaining 9 credits are electives.

Suggestions

Based upon past student experiences, the following suggestions may help you get more out of your Entrepreneurship Minor:

  • Participate in entrepreneurship competitions, including the Sontag Competition and the Nevada Governor's Cup.
  • Entrepreneurship is best learned by doing, and these competitions involve doing.
  • Join the Entrepreneurship Club and participate, starting your freshman year. This will give you much background, which will help you when you take the entrepreneurship courses. It will also allow you to develop a business idea and compete in entrepreneurship competitions prior to taking entrepreneurship courses.
  • Think about what courses will best complement the required entrepreneurship courses, given your business interests, and contact the Entrepreneurship Minor Advisor to choose electives for the minor that best suit you.
  • Plan to take ENT 401 and ENT 402 in the fall semester, and then take ENT 403 in spring semester, for ENT 401 and ENT 402 are pre-requisites for ENT 403. This will also allow you to best prepare for entrepreneurship competitions.

Required Courses (9 credits)

  • ENT 401 New Venture Creation: Explores the process of new venture creation, including opportunity recognition, determining feasibility, planning, securing capital, and team building. Assesses and develops entrepreneurial capacities.\ENT 402 Entrepreneurial Finance: Explores financial issues facing entrepreneurs, including stages of financing, cash flow, sources of funds, valuation, legal issues, strategic positioning, and exit strategies.
  • ENT 403 Applied Entrepreneurship: A new business venture is planned, including identifying the opportunity and market potentials, analyzing feasibility, articulating business functions, delineating risks and rewards. (Prerequisites: ENT 401 and ENT 402)

Elective Courses (9 credits)

There are pre-approved elective courses for the Entrepreneurship Minor, but students are also encouraged to speak to the Entrepreneurship Minor Advisor about the possibility of obtaining approval for other courses, for it is desirable to tailor your Entrepreneurship Minor to your business startup interests. Here is the list of courses currently preapproved for the Entrepreneurship Minor:

  • ENT 489 Entrepreneurship Internship: Internship with a business firm or organization providing practical experience and exposure to applied entrepreneurship problems.
  • ENT 493/693 Special Topics in Entrepreneurship: Study of selected topics in entrepreneurship.
  • ACC 201 Financial Accounting: In this course, you will learn the basic accounting practices, useful for tracking business performance.
  • MKT 210 Marketing Principles: In this course, you will learn basic marketing techniques and principles, useful for selling business products.
  • MGT 491 Decision Making and Negotiations: How to make good decisions, how to avoid decision errors associated with common decision biases, bargaining and negotiation skills, how to create and claim value.
  • MGT 491 Social Business: Integrates social media tools and operating principles across all levels of business. Develop a good personal brand in preparation for becoming a good digital citizen and a valuable asset to any business seeking to leverage the power of social business.
  • MGT 491 Applied Business Ethics:

Minor in Entrepreneurship Tailored for Management Majors

Students seeking to start their own business one day often select management as their major. The entrepreneurship minor can complement the management major by providing courses focused on business start up.

The generic Entrepreneurship Minor includes 18 total credits, consisting of 9 credits associated with three required courses and 9 credits of electives. For the management major, the 9 required credits presented below for the Entrepreneurship Minor will represent general electives for the management major, while the management courses listed below are courses that will be accepted as electives for the Entrepreneurship Minor. By choosing from the list of management courses listed below in the process of completing the management major, a Minor in Entrepreneurship is therefore obtained by completing ENT 401, ENT 402, and ENT 403.

Entrepreneurship Minor Advisor: Professor Mark Pingle; AB 319C; pingle@unr.edu; 784-6634.

Required Courses (9 credits) for Entrepreneurship Minor
(Electives for Management Major)

Suggestion

The student should take ENT 401 and ENT 402 in the fall semester and ENT 403 in spring semester, for ENT 401 and ENT 402 are pre-requisites for ENT 403.

  • ENT 401 New Venture Creation: Explores the process of new venture creation, including opportunity recognition, determining feasibility, planning, securing capital, and team building. Assesses and develops entrepreneurial capacities.
  • ENT 402 Entrepreneurial Finance: Explores financial issues facing entrepreneurs, including stages of financing, cash flow, sources of funds, valuation, legal issues, strategic positioning, and exit strategies.
  • ENT 403 Applied Entrepreneurship: A new business venture is planned, including identifying the opportunity and market potentials, analyzing feasibility, articulating business functions, delineating risks and rewards.

Elective Courses (9 credits)

Management majors seeking an Entrepreneurship Minor should select any three courses from the following:

  • MGT 367 Human Resource Management: Theoretical concepts and practical approaches relevant to management systems and processes; recruitment, training, appraisal, compensation and labor relations. Emphasis on legal constraints and international management.
  • MGT 423 Advanced Topics in Organizational and Personal Behavior: Selected behavioral influences affecting decision making, organizational structure, including organizational power and politics, change and development, and/or creativity.
  • MGT 467 Advanced Topics in Human Resource Management: This course is designed for advanced management students. Labor Relations, Compensation Management, Employee Selection, Training and Development, Cultural Diversity, or International HRM may be covered.
  • MGT 491 Decision Making and Negotiations: How to make good decisions, how to avoid decision errors associated with common decision biases, bargaining and negotiation skills, how to create and claim value.
  • MGT 491 Social Business: Integrates social media tools and operating principles across all levels of business. Develop a good personal brand in  preparation for becoming a good digital citizen and a valuable asset to any business seeking to leverage the power of social business.
  • MGT 491 Applied Business Ethics:

Courses


The following list of courses are available in entrepreneurship. For the latest class schedules, visit MyNEVADA.

  • ENT 401/601: New Venture Creation
    Exploring the process of new venture creation, including opportunity recognition, determining feasibility, planning, securing capital, and team building. Assesses and develops entrepreneurial capacities.
  • ENT 402/602: Entrepreneurial Finance
    Exploring financial issues facing entrepreneurs, including stages of financing, cash flow, sources of funds, valuation, legal issues, strategic positioning, and exit strategies.
  • ENT 403/603: Applied Entrepreneurship
    Planning a business venture, including identifying the opportunity and market potentials, analyzing feasibility, articulating business functions, delineating risks and rewards.
  • ENT 489/689: Entrepreneurship Internship
    Internship with a business firm or organization providing practical experience and exposure to applied entrepreneurship problems.
  • ENT 493/693: Special Topics in Entrepreneurship
    Study of selected topics in entrepreneurship.

Information on the Entrepreneurship Courses for Wintermester and Spring 2014 Semester


GENERAL INFORMATION

For the undergraduate Entrepreneurship Minor, Applied Entrepreneurship, ENT 403, is required and offered in the Spring Semester.  ENT 401 and ENT 402 are pre-requisites for ENT 403.  If you do not have both of these pre-requisites, you may be able to get a waiver by contacting the advisor, Professor Mark Pingle, at pingle@unr.edu

Undergraduate students who are working on a business should consider taking the Entrepreneurship Jumpstart Course, ENT 493, during the Wintermester.    Another good course offered during Wintermester is the Economics of Patent Law, ECON 493, and this course will be accepted for the Entrepreneurship Minor. 

Graduate students who are working on a business should also consider taking the Entrepreneurship Jumpstart Course, ENT 693, during the Wintermester.  Also, the Economics of Patent Law, ECON 493, will be available during the Wintermester and is suitable for the MBA Area of Emphasis.  MBA students seeking an Area of Emphasis in Entrepreneurship can also take Value Creation and Measurement, BADM 794, during the Spring Semester, or take ENT 603, Applied Entrepreneurship. 

If you cannot sign up online for the course you want, go to   www.business.unr.edu/addslip and fill out the form.  The form will be forwarded to the appropriate person and you may well be able to get enrolled into the course you desire.   

WINTERMESTER 2014

ENT 493/693  Special Topics in Entrepreneurship:  Entrepreneurial Jumpstart
Description:  Students with business ideas participate in a process designed to iteratively evaluate and develop the idea, while developing the entrepreneurial capacities of the student in the process.
Instructors:  Rod Hosilyk and Matt Westfield
Location: Redfield Campus:  Room TBA
Friday, Jan 10           5:30-10:00PM
Saturday, July 11     9:00AM-6:00PM
Sunday, July 12       9:00AM-6:00PM
Friday, July 17          5:30-10:00PM
Saturday, July 18     9:00AM-6:00PM
Sunday, July 19       9:00AM-6:00PM

ECON 493/693  Special Topics in Economics: The Economics of Patent Law
Description:  This is a law and economics course which will examine how firms use patent law as a form of competition.  The course will begin with the basics of patent law and the economic purpose of the patent statute. The course will then examine how firms compete using patent infringement actions and proceedings before the International Trade Commission, and the interface of these enforcement actions with antitrust law. The course will derive examples from the current "smartphone wars" and will examine recent cases such as Apple v. Samsung.
Instructor:  Lila Glaser
Location: FH 219
Dates:  December 31-January 17
Time(s):  Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 1:00PM-5:00PM 

SPRING 2014

ENT 403/603 Applied Entrepreneurship
Description:  Planning a business venture, including identifying the opportunity and market potentials, analyzing feasibility, articulating business functions, delineating risks and rewards
Instructor:  Gary Valiere
Location: WRB 2024
Time(s):  Wednesday 7:00PM-9:45

ENT 493/693 Special Topics in Entrepreneurship:  Entrepreneurial Marketing
Description:  Learn and apply marketing concepts and strategies especially useful for startups.  Emphasis is placed upon the distinctions between marketing in an entrepreneurial environment versus the classic marketing approaches in a larger corporate environment.  In particular, there will be a focus on how to achieve maximum market development results with very limited marketing resources
Instructor:  Chris Howard
Location: WRB 2025
Time(s):  Tuesday 7:00PM-9:4

BADM 794 Value Creation and Measurement
Description:  Identifying and measuring value in the corporate environment and the study of strategies useful in the development of enterprise value.
Instructor:  Chris Howard
Location: AB 107
Time(s):  Thursday 7:00PM-9:45

Advising


Advising for the entrepreneurship program is offered at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Advisors are located in the Ansari Business Building.

Undergraduate Advising


Mark Pingle

Mark Pingle

Charles N. Mathewson Professor of Entrepreneurship

College of Business/0030
University of Nevada, Reno
Reno, Nevada 89557
Telephone: (775) 784-6634
Fax: (775) 784-4728
pingle@unr.edu

Graduate Advising


Chris Howard

Chris Howard

Lecturer of Entrepreneurship

College of Business/0048
University of Nevada, Reno
Reno, Nevada 89557
Telephone: (775) 784-4912
Fax: (775) 784-1773
chris@nbsstar.com 

Faculty


Mark Pingle, Charles N. Mathewson Professor of Entrepreneurship

Mark Pingle

Roles
  • Program Coordination
  • Student Advisement
  • Internships (ENT 489/689)

Mark Pingle has a joint appointment as a professor of entrepreneurship and professor of economics. He received his B.S. degree in economics from Southern Oregon State College in 1983. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Southern California, in 1984 and 1988 respectively. Professor Pingle has scores of publications in macroeconomics, behavioral economics, and experimental economics. He has served as Chair of the University of Nevada Department of Economics and President of the International Society for the Advancement of Behavioral Economics. Desiring to more personally facilitate economic development in Northern Nevada, he shifted a large portion of his efforts toward the development of entrepreneurial talent. He spearheaded the effort to create the entrepreneurship program at the University of Nevada, subsequently spearheaded the creation of the community Entrepreneurship Nevada effort, and remains devoted to seeing entrepreneurial capacities developed at the university and in the community.


David Croasdell, Hopping Professor of Entrepreneurship

David Croasdell

Roles
  • Program Communications
  • Sontag Competition Coordinator

David Croasdell has a joint appointment as a professor of entrepreneurship and associate professor of Information Systems. He received his B.S. degree in Zoology from University of Idaho in 1986. He received his M.S. in Business Computing Science from Texas A&M University in 1990 and his Ph.D. in Business Administration from Texas A&M University in 2000. Professor Croasdell has served as Chair of the University of Nevada Department of Information Systems.


Rod Hosilyk, Entrepreneurship Letter of Appointment

Rod Hosilyk

Roles
  • Entrepreneurial Finance Instructor
  • Community Liason

Mr. Hosilyk is a seasoned results-oriented marketing-driven executive with international experience in both large corporations and entrepreneurial ventures specializing in strategic & niche marketing of manufactured products with a unique specialty in small mechanism design and consumer products. He has held corporate positions in engineering, manufacturing, operations and senior management and is highly effective in starting and growing entrepreneurial ventures quickly and with a minimum investment. After serving in the military at an early age, Mr. Hosilyk start his business career in a high volume manufacturing division of Rheem Manufacturing where he started as a design engineer and was promoted up through the management ranks to Director of Operations. From there he left to take a position with BASF as senior Vice President charged with building a large manufacturing facility in southern California. Mr. Hosilyk has designed products for production in the US, Europe, Japan, Taiwan, China & South America, and successfully brought hundreds of products to market, created "sales channels" from scratch and has done product licensing deals in Europe, Asia, Sweden and South America. Mr. Hosilyk left corporate life in 1980 and became what some call a serial entrepreneur, successfully growing and selling a number of companies. After spending 35 years in Orange County in Southern California, he moved to Reno NV when he sold his company, Road Warrior International, to a Reno based high-tech company in 2000. Mr. Hosilyk is currently Chairman of the Board of four companies, an adjunct professor teaching an Entrepreneurial Finance minor at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), a guest lecturer on entrepreneurial marketing & finance at both Pepperdine University in the Graziadio School of Business Executive MBA Program and at the University of San Diego in their Executive MBA program.



Related Degrees and Programs

Contact College of Business

Phone (775) 784-4912
Fax (775) 784-1773
Location Ansari Business Building

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