SuSanne Martin, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Areas of interest: comparative politics and international relations; terrorism, political violence, and party politics

Education
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, Government
M.A., University of Texas at Austin, Government
M.A., St. Mary's University of San Antonio, International Relations
B.B.A., University of Texas at Austin, International Business

Research

Susanne Martin's work is situated within the fields of comparative politics and international relations. In her dissertation, Martin investigates cases in which terrorist groups transition to party politics, as well as the more numerous, though less studied, cases in which political parties turn to violence. Martin uses a multi-method research design, combining large-n statistical analyses of factors related to linkages between political parties and terrorist groups and in-depth case studies in order to explore the conditions under which political groups change their tactics and the types of groups that are most likely to change their tactics.

In her work, Martin challenges existing theories related to regime type and organizational features and develops a theoretical foundation for understanding variations in shifts to and from terrorism across space and time.  Martin's research draws on theories of political party adaptation, organization, and the causes, logic, and end of terrorism. Martin’s research offers insights into the causes, conditions, and catalysts associated with political group adaptation; political development and change; and the end of terrorism.  Martin’s findings have implications for domestic and international security and foreign policy.

Publications

Dissertation: "Political Group Adaptation: From Parliamentarianism to Terrorism and Back Again" Dissertation Committee: Ami Pedahzur and Robert Moser (co-chairs), Zoltan Barany, Patrick McDonald, Leonard Weinberg

"Violence, Elections and Party Politics" (co-edited with Leonard Weinberg and Mary Beth Altier).  Special issue of Terrorism and Political Violence with introductory and concluding chapters by the co-editors, January 2013. 

Working Papers and Projects

“Timing of Terrorism” (with Leonard Weinberg).  In this project we investigate the timing of terrorist events within larger-scale episodes of political violence.
“A Bullets to Ballots Strategy:  Does Participating in Party Politics Pay Off.”  In this paper I investigate the ways in which participating in party politics has paid off for formerly and currently violent groups.
“How Participating in Party Politics Pays Off.”  This paper offers a typology of the ways in which participating in party politics may pay off for political groups facing the options of engaging in elections or using other tactics.
"Turning to and from Terror: The conditions under which political groups choose violent and nonviolent tactics" (with Arie Perliger). Earlier version of this paper presented in 2008.
"Weak Democracies and Reactions to Extremism" (with Ami Pedahzur, Arie Perliger, and Eran Zaidise). Paper presented in 2009.
"Regional Variations in the Strategic Use of Violence." Paper presented in 2009. "Does the transition to party politics pay off?" (with Ami Pedahzur). This paper explores whether the violent political groups that turn to party politics benefit from this transition and, if so, in what ways.
"Endogenous Formation of Terrorist Groups" (with a research team including scholars from across the United States). Research initiated during a conference sponsored by the National Science Foundation at the University of Texas at Dallas. This project is an interdisciplinary effort bringing together behavioral economists, experimental economists, and political scientists.
“In the Shadow of the Gunman:  The Assassination of World Leaders, 1946-2000” (with Bob Ostergard).  In this paper we offer new insights into institutional reactions to assassinations.
"Suboptimal Bargaining" (with a research team at the University of Texas at Austin). This paper examines suboptimal bargaining and outcomes in the context of hostage situations. Conference

Presentations

“The Endogenous Formation of Terrorist Groups” (with Michael McBride, Natalia Londono, and Sherry Forbes). Paper to be presented at the annual conference of the International Studies Association, San Francisco, April 2012.
“Veil and the Voice” (with Bozena Welborne, Aubrey Westfall, Sarah Tobin, and Ozge Celik).  Paper prepared for presentation at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association in New Orleans, LA, September 2012 (conference cancelled).
“In the Shadow of the Gunman:  The Assassination of World Leaders, 1946-2000” (with Bob Ostergard).  Paper presented at the meeting of the British International Studies Association/International Studies Association, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, June 18-21, 2012.
"The Impact of Organizational Characteristics on Strategy Choice and Change." Paper to be presented at the Midwest Political Science Association National Conference in Chicago, April 2010. Dissertation, Chapter 6.
"When Terrorists Reject Violence: Conditions Conducive to the Strategic Use of Nonviolence." Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association in Toronto, September 2009. Dissertation, Chapter 5.
"Weak Democracies and Reactions to Extremism" (with Ami Pedahzur, Arie Perliger, and Eran Zaidise). Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association in Toronto, September 2009. Working paper.
"Regional Variations in the Strategic Use of Violence." Paper presented at the Midwest Political Science Association National Conference in Chicago, April 2009. Dissertation, Chapter 4.
"Nation-Building and the Politics of Language: Considering the Croatian Case." Paper presented at the International Studies Association Annual Convention in New York City, February 2009. Research for Master's Report.
"Language Reform and the Politicization of Language—The Croatian Case." Paper presented at the National Convention of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies in Philadelphia, November 2008. Research for Master's Report.
"Choosing Violence or Nonviolence—Attractiveness and Unattractiveness in Strategic Decision—Making" (with Ami Pedahzur, Arie Perliger, and Leonard Weinberg). Paper presented at the Midwest Political Science Association National Conference in Chicago, April 2008, and at the International Studies Association Annual Convention in San Francisco, March 2008. Working paper.
"Choosing Violence or Nonviolence—How Political Groups Select their Strategies" (with Ami Pedahzur, Arie Perliger, and Leonard Weinberg). Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Western Political Science Association in San Diego, February 2008. Working paper.

 

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Susanne Martin, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
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