Announcements

Dimitri Keriotis : a reading

Dimitri Keriotis For a reading

Dimitri Keriotis earned his MA in Literature and Environment at the University of Nevada Reno. While teaching part-time at Lake Tahoe Community College, he co-founded and co-directed the Tahoe Wilderness Institute. He earned an MFA in Creative Writing from CSU Chico and now teaches English at Modesto Junior College, where he co-founded and co-coordinates the High Sierra Institute.

His short fiction has been published in Beloit Fiction JournalGeorgetown ReviewFlyway, BorderSenses, and elsewhere, and he has written for Poets & Writers. In the fall of 2014, SFA Press released his debut collection of short stories, The Quiet Time.

Details:
Date: Thursday, February 12
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: MIKC 422 -- University of Nevada, Reno Campus

Sponsored by:

English Department's Public Occasions Committee

For further information:
Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

 

Posted February 05, 2015

June Saraceno For a reading generously supported by the Crowley Poetry Fund

June Saraceno For a reading generously supported by the Crowley Poetry Fund

June Saraceno is author of Altars of Ordinary Light, published by Plain View Press in 2007, and a chapbook of prose poems, Mean Girl Trips, published in 2006 by Pudding House Press. Her work, both poetry and fiction, has appeared widely in journals. Her second full-length collection of poetry, of Dirt and Tar, was recently released by Cherry Grove Collections.

She is currently English Program Chair at Sierra Nevada College, Lake Tahoe, where she is director of the popular Writers in the Woods literary speaker series and founding editor of the Sierra Nevada Review.

Details:
Date: February 26
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: MIKC 107 -- University of Nevada, Reno Campus

Sponsored by:

The English Department
Crowley Poetry Fund

For further information:
Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

Posted February 18, 2015

 

 

Talks by Vetran Journalist Paddy Woodworth on ecological restoration

Talks by Vetran Journalist Paddy Woodworth on ecological restoration

Veteran journalist from Ireland, Paddy Woodworth, will lecture on ecological restoration, based on his recent book, Our Once and Future Planet: Restoring the World in the Climate Change Century (University of Chicago Press, 2013).

Paddy Woodworth's lectures:

Tuesday, March 31, 1:00 PM, AB 102 “'Novel Ecosystems' -- new normal or red herring?"

The argument that 'novel ecosystems' are irreversibly degraded, and that we should abandon restoration efforts, embrace invasive aliens, and manage these systems to maximize ecosystem goods and services, has gained a lot of currency in recent years. But Woodworth argues that the real barrier to restoration is usually not an ecological one, but is in fact social, political and/or economic. If that is the case, 'novel ecosystems' science is in danger of handing spurious arguments to the enemies of conservation, conflating ecological theory and policy, and making difficult decisions in the field more difficult still. Woodworth will offer a global tour of restoration projects he visited while researching for the book, each of which illustrates particular challenges and responses.

Wednesday, April 1, 4:30 PM, MICK 124 Wells Fargo Auditorium "Ecological Restoration -- the flawed visions of the founders, the prospects for the future”

This presentation will look at the visions that informed the original midwestern restoration movement -- the balance of nature, pristine ('pre-human') landscapes, prelapsarian paradises. Woodworth suggests that these visions were more or less based on faulty assumptions, but he argues that restoration nonetheless has many merits as a means of engaging with the natural world and conserving biodiversity effectively.

Our Once and Future Planet

Paddy Woodworth

Our Once and Future Planet: Restoring the World in the Climate Change Century University of Chicago Press, 2013 (536 pp.)

Publisher's Description:

The environmental movement is plagued by pessimism. And that’s not unreasonable: with so many complicated, seemingly intractable problems facing the planet, coupled with a need to convince people of the dangers we face, it’s hard not to focus on the negative

But that paints an unbalanced—and overly disheartening—picture of what’s going on with environmental stewardship today. There are success stories, and Our Once and Future Planet delivers a fascinating account of one of the most impressive areas of current environmental experimentation and innovation: ecological restoration. Veteran investigative reporter Paddy Woodworth has spent years traveling the globe and talking with people—scientists, politicians, and ordinary citizens—who are working on the front lines of the battle against environmental degradation. At sites ranging from Mexico to New Zealand and Chicago to Cape Town, Woodworth shows us the striking successes (and a few humbling failures) of groups that are attempting to use cutting-edge science to restore blighted, polluted, and otherwise troubled landscapes to states of ecological health—and, in some of the most controversial cases, to particular moments in historical time, before widespread human intervention. His firsthand field reports and interviews with participants reveal the promise, power, and limitations of restoration.Woodworth flier

Ecological restoration alone won’t solve the myriad problems facing our environment. But Our Once and Future Planet demonstrates the role it can play, and the hope, inspiration, and new knowledge that can come from saving even one small patch of earth.

 

Presented by:

The UNR English Department

The UNR Geography Department

The UNR History Department

The UNR Center for Basque Studies

The Hilliard Foundation

 

Posted March 26, 2015

 

Manuel Gonzales: Fiction Reading

Manuel Gonzales: Fiction Reading

Manuel Gonzales is the author of THE MINIATURE WIFE AND OTHER STORIES (Riverhead) and the forthcoming novel, THE REGIONAL OFFICE IS UNDER ATTACK! (Riverhead). He graduated with a BA in English from the University of Texas in 1996 and then with an MFA in Creative Writing (Fiction) from Columbia University's School of the Arts in 2003. His fiction and nonfiction have been published in McSweeney's, Fence, Tin House, Open City, One Story, The Believer, i09.com, and various other publications. He is the recipient of the Academy of Arts and Letters Sue Kaufman Price for First Fiction and the Binghamton University John Gardner Prize for Fiction. For four years he ran the nonprofit writing and tutoring center for kids, Austin Bat Cave, and in times past he co-owned The Clarksville Pie Company in Austin, TX, where he baked pies for a living.

“Delightful freakishness.”
—Susannah Meadows, The New York Times

“The stories are written so believably, they handle the strange and surreal so carefully, that you want to believe the impossible is possible.” —Roxane Gay, Tin House

Details:
Date: February 18th
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Location: Graduate Reading Room, Fourth Floor, Knowledge Center

Sponsored by:

The Black Mountain Institute of UNLV

The UNR English Department

Nevada Humanities


 

Posted February 18, 2015

Fifth Annual UNR College of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Symposium (CLAGS)

Fifth Annual UNR College of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Symposium (CLAGS)

Reno, Nevada – February 18, 2015 – The fifth Annual UNR College of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Symposium (CLAGS) offers a window into the cutting edge of academic research regarding what is means to be human. This year’s theme is Constructing Humanity.

CLAGS is an interdisciplinary conference designed to increase dialogue and knowledge across, but not limited to, the liberal arts and between institutions, offering participants an opportunity to broaden academic research and develop professional relationships.
This year’s event includes 115 presenters in 35 disciplines from 40 universities. There are 37 panels, 2 visual artists, 2 musical performances, a poet, and a documentary film.

CLAGS will be held on February 26-28, 2015 at the University of Nevada, Reno in the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center’s at 1664 N. Virginia Street. CLAGS begins at 1pm on Thursday, February 26 and runs until 6pm on Saturday, February 28.

CLAGS is proud to announce a keynote talk and public lecture by Dr. Eric Lott on Saturday, February 28 at 5PM in the Wells Fargo Arena MIKC 124. Dr. Lott is a cultural historian and Professor of English at the Graduate Center – CUNY. He is also a committee member in the American Studies Association, co-director of the Future of American Studies Institute, and an editorial board member of Criticism. He is the author of Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class (1993), The Disappearing Liberal Intellectual (2006), and the forthcoming Black Mirror: the Cultural Contradictions of American Racism. Dr. Lott will also attend a brown bag talk on Friday, February 27 at 12:30PM in the Leonard Reading Room MIKC 422. Lunch will be provided.

CLAGS is free and open to the public thanks to the generous support of the College of Liberal Arts Hilliard Endowment, the English Department’s Public Occasions Committee, the Graduate Student Association, and several departments including the Gender, Race and Identity Program, Political Science, the Center for Basque Studies, Philosophy and History.

Additional information can be found here: <https://clags2015.wordpress.com>


Schedule:
Date: February 26 @1pm - February 28 @ 6pm
Location: University of Nevada, Reno in the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center’s
at 1664 N. Virginia Street.

 

Posted February 18, 2015

Brian Teare deliver's a series of Talks

Gailmarie Pahmeier Appointed Reno Poet Laureate

Former Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, Brian Teare has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the MacDowell Colony, the Marin Headlands Center for the Arts and the American Antiquarian Society. He’s written five full-length books: The Empty Form, The Room Where I Was Born, Sight Map, the Lambda Award-winning Pleasure, and Companion Grasses, one of Slate’s best 2013 poetry books and finalist for the Kingsley Tufts Award. He’s published seven chapbooks: Pilgrim, Transcendental Grammar Crown, , Paradise Was Typeset, Helplessness, [black sun crown], and SORE EROS. He’s an Assistant Professor at Temple University, where he makes books by hand for his micropress, Albion Books.

For more information and a sample of Teare’s poems, please contact Ann Keniston, keniston@unr.edu

Schedule:

“Nature Poetry after Whitman"

Date: Thursday, April 23rd, 2015 from 11:00-12:15pm
Location: Frandsen Hall 129.

“Queering Ecopoetics"

Date: Thursday, April 23rd, 2015 from 2:30-3:45pm
Location: Frandsen Hall 109.

“Poetry Reading"

Date: Thursday, April 24th, 2015 from 2:30-3:45pm
Location: MIKC 422 from noon-1:00pm.

 

Sponsored by:

The UNR English Department Public Occasions Committee

Thie Hilliard Endowment

 

Posted March 30, 2015

Event Calendar

Additional Items of Interest

English Department Clubs

UNR Linguistics Club

The English Department helps to support several clubs for UNR's students. Please click on the images above to learn more about each club.

Internships Available

Student Studying

Internships for credit available to qualified junior and senior undergraduate English majors and minors. See a list of available positions here. Contact English Department Internship Coordinator Gailmarie Pahmeier for more information.

University Writing Center

Student Studying

Funded by student fees under the ASUN-initiated and student-approved Joint Vision 2017

Plan, the University Writing Center provides free one-on-one tutoring for undergraduate and graduate students. UWC staff is also available to give presentations to classes, faculty, and other groups.

Past Announcements

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