Faculty Biography

Katherine Fusco

Katherine Fusco

Assistant Professor

Degrees:

BA (English – State University of New York at Geneseo); MA (English—Vanderbilt University); PhD (English—Vanderbilt University)

Contact Information:

Email: kfusco@unr.edu

Personal Webpage / Blog: www.katherinefusco.com

Academic Specializations:

Nineteenth- and twentieth century American fiction, Literary Naturalism and Realism, Modernism, Film Studies, Literary and cultural theory

Recent Publications:

"Better Travel through Brand Names: The Couture Grand Tour in Paris is a Woman’s Town and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" (Forthcoming at MFS: Modern Fiction Studies)

"Squashing the Bookworm: Manly Attention and Representations of Male Reading in Silent Film" (Forthcoming in Modernism/Modernity)

“The Actress Experience: Cruel Knowing and the Death of the Picture Personality in Black Swan and The Girlfriend ExperienceCamera Obscura 28.1 (2013): 1-35. <http://cameraobscura.
dukejournals .org/content/28/1_82/1
>

“Love and Citation in Midnight in Paris: Remembering Modernism, Remembering Woody.” Forthcoming in The Blackwell Companion to Woody Allen. Eds. Peter Bailey and Sam Girgus.

“Love and Citation in Midnight in Paris: Remembering Modernism, Remembering Woody.” Forthcoming in The Blackwell Companion to Woody Allen. Eds. Peter Bailey and Sam Girgus.

“Taking Naturalism to the Moving Picture Show: Frank Norris’s Influence on D.W. Griffith’s Narrative Development from A Corner in Wheat to The Birth of a Nation.” Adaptation. 3.2 (September 2010): 132-154.

“Systems Not Men: Producing People in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland.” Studies in the Novel. 41.4 (Winter 2009): 418-434.

Works in Progress:

Progress Without People: Time, Narrative, and Naturalism in Silent Film and U.S. Literature, 1895-1915.

This project reconsiders representations of time in modernity. I argue that narrative innovations in naturalist novels and early films respond to cultural anxieties about time in industrial modernity.  I position naturalism as the worldview engaged by a variety of turn-of-the-century time management techniques, and I argue that the cinema developed its narrative norms in response to the naturalist conception of temporal progress as a limit on human freedom.

Kelly Reichardt: Emergency and the Everyday
(Under Contract at University of Illinois Press)

Co-written with Nicole Seymour, this project argues that Reichardt’s cinema is animated by two seemingly-opposed concepts, emergency and the everyday. Indeed, the content of her films can be alternately described as either disasters or non-events, depending on one’s viewpoint. Through our readings, we reframe the concept of emergency, to consider its shared root with emergence: the slowly unfolding, or the barely perceptible. Following from the sense that emergencies are both accumulative and slow to unfold, we argue that living through emergency may in fact be an “everyday” experience.