Past Announcements

Below, you will find a list of past announcements made on the English Department website.

Past Announcements

Fall 2014

Understanding Ferguson: A Conversation

A Roundtable discussion on race hosted by Professors Paul Mitchell and Justin Gifford

A Roundtable discussion on race hosted by Professors Paul Mitchell and Justin Gifford

This town hall meeting will look to frame historical events that have led to social unrest along racial lines (most recently Ferguson) and build alliances that will help confront ongoing injustices.

Details:
Date: Monday, 9/29
Time: 6:30-9:30PM
Location: RSJ Reading Room

Extra: Pizza/drinks will be provided

 

Posted September 21, 2014

Lars Engle Lectures on “Montaigne’s Shakespeare”

Lars Engle Lectures on “Montaigne’s Shakespeare”

In a brilliant and influential series of articles on Shakespeare and Montaigne, Professor Engle has argued for the intellectual modernity of these two thinkers, drawing attention to a significant number of previously overlooked associational links between Montaigne and Shakespeare, such as the critical correlation between sovereign power and cruelty. Montaigne’s Shakespeare is a lecture that will fascinate everyone with an interest in the important connections between these two central figures of the 16th century.

Lars Engle is the James G. Watson Professor of English at the University of Tulsa. Educated at Harvard, Cambridge, and Yale, he is the author of Studying Shakespeare’s Contemporaries and Shakespearean Pragmatism, and numerous articles on Renaissance drama and South African Literature. He is the founding editor of The Yale Journal of Criticism, one of the general editors of English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology, and a former trustee of the Shakespeare Association of America. He also holds the John M. Kirk Chair in Medieval Literature at Bread Loaf Oxford and the Lloyd David Memorial Professorship in Shakespeare Studies at the University of Queensland.

Sponsored by:
The Hilliard Endowment
The Nevada Early Modern Organization
The Department of English

Details:
Date: Monday, September 29,
Time:h, 4:00 PM
Location: Wells Fargo Auditorium of the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center

For more information contact Professor Steve Gehrke at sgherke@unr.edu

 

Posted September 18, 2014

Professor Ashley Marshall Receives Research Award

Professor Ashley Marshall Receives Research Award

This year's recipient of the Mousel-Feltner Award for Excellence in Research and/or Creative Activity is Assistant Professor of English Ashley Marshall. In 2013 alone, she published three substantial articles, two chapters in edited collections, and a review essay. Last year also saw the publication by Johns Hopkins University Press of her monograph,The Practice of Satire in England: 1658-1770. Quoting in part from English department chair Professor Eric Rasmussen's letter of support, awards committee member Professor Ann Keniston noted that Ashley's publications make major, and at times controversial, contributions to eighteenth-century British literary studies, offering readings of particular texts and their publication history which often unsettle common assumptions. Her book is even more impressive in its scope: based on a reading of some 3000 satires, Ashley identifies six different and period-specific modes. The Practice of Satire in England has already been called both the first study of "a subject...that has never been systematically dealt with" and "a major advance upon [earlier] scholarship." In fact, enthused one reader, "I do not see how any serious scholarship on satire will be able to proceed henceforth without reference to Marshall's book," and another added that "I have no doubt that Marshall's bracing, assertive study will cause much talk in the academy."

Posted June 11, 2014

James Mardock's New Edition of Henry V

James Mardock's New Edition of Henry V

Just released from Broadview Press is Associate Professor of English and Crowley Distinguished Professor of the Humanities James Mardock's new edition of William Shakespeare's Henry V , or, as it was first known in the 1623 First Folio, The Life of Henry Fift. In addition to annotations that Holger Syme of the University of Toronto calls "clear, straightforward, and rich," Professor Mardock includes in his edition a dozen accompanying documents to illuminate and explicate this most well-known of the history plays, as well as an introduction that Elizabeth Hodgson of the University of British Columbia characterizes as "extensive and detailed . . . particularly thorough on the play's performance history (stage and screen) from its earliest productions to the early 21st century." In fact, Syme calls Mardock's introduction a "gem . . . accessible enough for an undergraduate reader, it stands as a gracefully argued, learned, and remarkably acute major piece of criticism in its own right, a genuine contribution to the scholarly debates about Henry V."

Posted June 02, 2014

Elisabeth A. Linn named the College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Graduate in the Humanities

This year the College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Graduate in the Humanities was English Literature major Elisabeth A. Linn (pictured raising a toast with proud father Brad).

This year the College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Graduate in the Humanities was English Literature major Elisabeth A. Linn (pictured raising a toast with proud father Brad).

Born and raised in Carson City, Elisabeth started out as a vocal performance major, but changed to Secondary Education so her singing, as she puts it, "could remain a crazy, powerful passion, not a career." She switched again, this time to English Literature. "I love literature," she says, "pretty much all genres and periods, because it reflects history, music, and the human condition so well." Her faculty mentor Dr. Ashley Marshall adds that "Elisabeth is completely unlike any other student I've ever encountered, in her un-self-conscious enthusiasm for life and learning. She reads voraciously, from Bill Bryson to Chaucer, and finds meaning in just about anything she reads, from the ancients to the moderns, American to Europeans, youthful enthusiasts to jaded curmudgeons."

Next fall Elisabeth starts on an MA in Medieval Literature with the goal of earning a PhD and, along the way, interning at the Library of Congress and in her free time pursuing a love of mountain climbing and open-water swimming.

And the music? Well, as the May commencement exercises ended with the traditional singing of "The Mackay Song," who do you think was out in front of the assembled graduates in her cap and gown, leading her fellow students in song? "Maybe," she says, "they'll invite us alumni to return and sing!"

Posted June 02, 2014

Spring 2014

Professor Pahmeier publishes
The Rural Lives of Nice Girls

Professor Pahmeier publishes The Rural Lives of Nice Girls

“Gailmarie Pahmeier’s The Rural Lives of Nice Girls creates a world of longing and loss across the barrooms and front porches of Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Nevada, revealing a ‘geography of magic and shame,’ where the narrator unapologetically delivers ‘something/ real good and real strong.’”
—Suzanne Roberts Author of Plotting Temporality

“Gailmarie Pahmeier’s poems are lush, cinematic narratives from a singular American female voice -- mesmerizing in their grace, masterful in their craft. As much as these poems are pure heart and soul, they are gems: pieces of art by a gorgeous spirit and a talent any poet should envy. These are the poems I wish I could write---fortunately I get to read them, again and again, a pure joy every time.”
—Lee Herrick Author of Gardening Secrets of the Dead

“Gailmarie’s supple poems are tales of family and home—finding it, making it, cooking it, calling it, leaving it. They open the door, invite you in to sit a spell, maybe have a drink and listen to lyric stories of small town lives off the side of the highway. Listen she says, it’s important for these folks, as well as the rest of us, to tell the stories that need to be told, to witness and testify whilst we can.”
—Kirk Robertson Poet, essayist, publisher, editor, and artist

 

 

Posted May 07, 2014

Professor Cheryll Glotfelty Receives Regents' Academic Advisor Award

Professor Cheryll Glotfelty

At the Board of Regents' meeting last week, Professor Cheryll Glotfelty was selected to receive the 2014 Regents' Academic Advisor Award. This system-wide award is not only a great honor, but a fitting acknowledgement of the exceptional work that Cheryll has done as Director of Graduate Studies in our department.

Please join with me in congratulating Cheryll on this wonderful accomplishment -- and please plan to attend the University's "Honor the Best" Ceremony in early May when the award will be conferred upon her!

 

 

 

Posted March 27, 2014

Three English Graduate Students win Russell J. and Dorothy S. Bilinski Fellowship

Russell J. and Dorothy S. Bilinski Fellowship

Three English PhD students have been selected to receive Russell J. and Dorothy S. Bilinski Fellowships for the next academic year:

Kyle Bladow, "Organizing Fictions: Material Ecocriticism, Environmental Justice, and American Indian Literature"

Katrina Miller, "The Rhetoricality of Writing Assessment: Constraints and Contingent Possibilities"

Meghan Sweeney, "Identifying Threshold Concepts for College-Level Reading"

The University of Nevada, Reno College of Liberal Arts recently received a gift from the Bilinski Educational Foundation to fund dissertation-year fellowships for doctoral students in the humanities and social sciences. The $500,000 gift created the Russell J. and Dorothy S. Bilinski Fellowship Fund for Land-Grant Liberal Arts Scholarship. The 20 annual Bilinski fellowships each include a stipend and a modest travel allowance.

Posted March 14, 2014

a Reading by Dora Malech 

Patricia Smith Gives a reading

In Celebration of National Poetry Month The UNR English Department and the Crowley Poetry Fund present a reading by Dora Malech.

Dora Malech earned her MFA in Poetry from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop in 2005. The Waywiser Press published her first full-length collection of poems, Shore Ordered Ocean, in 2009 and the Cleveland State University Poetry Center published her second collection, Say So, in 2011. 

Her poems have appeared in numerous publications, including The New Yorker, Poetry, Best New Poets, American Letters & Commentary, Poetry London, and The Yale Review.  She lives in Iowa City, where she writes, draws, teaches, and coordinates the Iowa Youth Writing Project, an arts outreach program for children and teens.

 

 

Details:
Date: Tuesday, April 29
Time: 6:00PM
Location: Great Room, Joe Crowley Student Union
University of Nevada, Reno Campus

For further information:
Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

Posted April 21, 2014

 

Poetry Reading:
Ann Keniston, Steven Nightingale, Joe Crowley

Join us Wednesday, April 23 at 6:30 p.m., for an evening of poetry with Ann Keniston, Steven Nightingale, and Joe Crowley. This evening is part of Sundance Books and Music's month long celebration of National Poetry Month.

This program is made possible through a partnership with Nevada Humanities and with support from the Nightingale Family Foundation.

 

Ann Keniston

Ann Keniston

Ann Keniston is the author of the poetry collection The Caution of Human Gestures (Wordtech, 2005) and a new chapbook, November Wasps: Elegies (Finishing Line, 2013); she is also coeditor of The New American Poetry of Engagement: A 21st Century Anthology (2012). Her poems have recently appeared in Literary Imagination, Southwest Review, Tampa Review, and elsewhere, and she has received grants from the Somerville (MA) Arts Council, the Sierra Arts Foundation (NV), and the Nevada Arts Council. Also a scholar of contemporary American poetry, she is the author of the critical study Overheard Voices: Address and Subjectivity in Postmodern American Poetry. She is currently finishing a new full-length poetry collection, entitled “Lament/Praise” and a scholarly study of memory in postwar American poetry. An associate professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno, she lives in Reno with her husband and teenaged sons

 

 

Steven Nightingale

Steven Nightingale

Steven Nightingale is the author of two novels, The Lost Coast and The Thirteenth Daughter of the Moon; Cartwheels, a limited edition book of sonnets; and four collections of sonnets published by the Black Rock Press. A native Nevadan, he received a B.A. at Stanford University where he studied computer science and literature. He lives in the Santa Cruz mountains near Woodside, California, with his wife Lucy and daughter Gabriella.

 

 

 

Joe Crowley

Joe Crowley

Joe Crowley is a former professor and administrator at the University of Nevada, Reno, who writes poetry in retirement. His publications include books about the college presidency and related subjects, the centennial history of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and lately, various poems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, please go to Sundance Book's Webpage.

Details:

Date: Wednesday, April 23th

Time: 6:30 - 7:30 PM

Location: Sundance Books and Music
121 California Ave Reno, NV 89509
(775) 786-1188

Posted April 11, 2014

Katherine Fusco Discusses Lon Chaney and Ethics & Affects in The Phantom of the Opera

Katherine Fusco Discusses Lon Chaney and Ethics & Affects in <em>The Phantom of the Opera

Lon Chaney, "The Man of a Thousand Faces" as he was known, made films that can be seen as meditations on the promises and limits of sympathy. As ethics and affects increasingly interest film scholars and narrative theorists, Chaney's horror films are an important site for ethical thinking. Chaney's star persona and his filmography explore the relationship between identification and empathy, revealing the ethical problems of basing the latter on the former. To do so, he experimented with non-normative faces, repeatedly transforming through makeup so that the stability of the face comes into question. Using The Phantom of the Opera (1925) as a test case, this paper considers both philosophical and psychological studies of disgust - the affective state elicited by the non-normative face and which Chaney asks his audiences to reconsider. Finally, this paper considers the role editing and cinematography can play in making audiences think differently.

Details:
Date: Friday, April 18
Time: 3:00-4:00PM
Location: Frandsen Humanities 107

 

Posted April 11, 2014

The English Department’s Blood, Love, and Rhetoric School presents a reading of Middleton’s A Mad World, My Masters.

The English Department’s Blood, Love, and Rhetoric School presents a reading of Middleton’s A Mad World, My Masters.

At 7:00 pm, April 17, we will gather at 1080 Mount Rose, divvy up parts, and muddle through this hilarious and meticulously-plotted comedy greed and lust in seventeenth-century London. Masks, daggers, codpieces, and talent are not required; only enthusiasm is compulsory.

RSVP, request a PDF of the script, ask for directions, and/or call dibs on a part to James Mardock at jmardock@unr.edu.

 

Details:
Date: Thursday, April 17
Time: 7:00PM
Location: 1080 Mount Rose
Reno, NV

Posted March 31, 2014

The English Department Public Occasions Committee presents a reading by Patricia Smith

Patricia Smith Gives a reading

Patricia Smith is the author of six books of poetry, including Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah, winner of the 2013 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize from the Academy of American Poets and the Phillis Wheatley Award and finalist for the

William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America and the Balcones Prize. Blood Dazzler was a finalist for the National Book Award and Teahouse of the Almighty was a National Poetry Series selection.

Her work has appeared in Poetry, The Paris Review, The New York Times, TriQuarterlyTin House, The Washington Post, and in both Best American Poetry and Best American Essays.  A 2012 fellow at MacDowell and Yaddo, she is a two-time Pushcart Prize winner, recipient of a Lannan fellowship and a four-time individual champion of the National Poetry Slam, the most successful poet in its history.

She is currently working on a biography of Harriet Tubman, a poetry volume combining text and 19th century African-American photos, and a libretto for City Steam, a celebration of the re-opening of Philadelphia’s Dilworth Plaza. Patricia is a professor at the College of Staten Island and an instructor in the MFA program at Sierra Nevada College, where she is currently a Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Humanities.

Details:
Date: Wednesday, April 9
Time: 5:30PM
Location: MIKC 422
University of Nevada, Reno Campus

For further information:
Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

Posted March 31, 2014

Teacheras-Teaching-Teachers: The Burkean Parlor & Service Learning

Professor Rasmussen wins Falstaff Award for William Shakespeare and Others: Collaborative Plays

We are having another Teachers-Teaching-Teachers next Friday (April 4th) from 12-1 in the DCS (FH 037). This time we will be discussing English 102: Dr. Walsh and English 102 Coordinator Matt Zytkoskee will be giving an update on their Burkean Parlor research collaboration with the library; and Laurel Griffiths will be talking about an innovative service learning approach to 102. Please come and join us.

Details:
Date: Friday, April 4
Time: 12:00 - 1:00PM
Location: FH 037,
University of Nevada, Reno

 

 

Posted March 27, 2014

Public Talk on Digital Rhetoric with Dr. Casey Boyle

Javier Arbona--Military Abstractions: The Hidden Architecture of State Secrecy

Rhetoric@Reno has sponsored a public talk by Dr. Casey Boyle from the University of Utah. Dr. Boyle will discuss his current research involving interactions between humans and new media and technologies. Please join us for Dr. Boyle’s lecture, question and answer session, and reception on Friday April 4th at 4pm in LLC 142. A promotional flyer with further details is attached to this email.
This event is funded in part by a grant from the Nevada Humanities with additional financial support provided by the University of Nevada College of Liberal Arts and the Hilliard Endowment.


You can learn more about Rhetoric@Reno by visiting our website: http://groups.unr.edu/rhetoric/

 

Details:
Date: Friday, April 4
Time: 4:00PM
Location: LLC 142,
University of Nevada, Reno

 

Posted March 27, 2014

Professor Marshall Discusses her Book Project "Jonathan Swift and History: Politics and the English Past"

Professor Marshall Discusses her Book Project "Jonathan Swift and History: Politics and the English Past"

In the first event of the department's Spring Faculty Colloquium Series, Professor Ashley Marshall will discuss her second monograph. "Jonathan Swift and History: Politics and the English Past" takes the controversial stance that political history mattered to Swift: despite his disappointment in the Historiographer post and his not having “done history,” an understanding of his relationship to the historical mode, Marshall argues, is crucial to understanding his career.

A departmental happy hour will follow at Old Granite Street Eatery.

Details:
Date: Friday, March 28th
Time: 3:00-4:30PM
Location: Frandsen Hall 107
University of Nevada, Reno

 

Public Screening of Documentary Short Films by Robert Sickels

Public Screening of Documentary Short Films by Robert Sickels

An alumnus of the English Department's PhD program, Robert Sickels is now Chair of Film and Media Studies at Whitman College. A specialist in western American literature and film, he is the author of a number of books, including American Film in the Digital Age. He is also an award winning documentary filmmaker. At the event, we will screen three of Robert's recent short documentary films (about 10 minutes each), followed by Q&A. Among these short docs is his new film, American Lawn, which examines (from a number of perspectives) how Americans think about and relate to their lawns. This fascinating film has already enjoyed wide festival screenings around the country.

Details:
Date: Thursday, March 27
Time: 4:30PM
Location: KC 124
University of Nevada, Reno

Posted March 03, 2014

Military Abstractions: The Hidden Architecture of State Secrecy

Javier Arbona--Military Abstractions: The Hidden Architecture of State Secrecy

Geographer and urban theorist Javier Arbona will give a public talk entitled “Military Abstractions: The Hidden Architecture of State Secrecy” at 6:30 pm on Tuesday, March 25, in room 101 of the Reynolds School of Journalism, University of Nevada, Reno. This event is sponsored by the Gender, Race, and Identity Program and the Departments of English, Geography, and History.

Arbona’s talk will address the visual appearance of the state in everyday life, focusing on the visual signatures of state secrecy. The architecture of state secrecy, he argues, often hides in plain sight. He will discuss techniques for capturing the movement of the state in a historical moment marked both by the ubiquity of imaging technologies and increasing disquiet and skepticism about their reach.

Arbona’s talk draws upon his work as a member of the Demilit collective, which he founded in 2010 with Bryan Finoki and Nick Sowers. Demilit is a playful collaboration focused on walking, exploring, listening, and experimenting—all aimed at deciphering and exploring the entanglements of militarization with everyday life. The group produces work that encompasses audio pieces, visuals, events, texts, web memes, and more, drawing from architecture, sound art, creative writing, geography, and other fields. Their work has been featured at the Marin Headlands Center for the Arts, the Istanbul Design Biennial, the San José Biennial, the UC San Diego University Art Gallery, Other Cinema, and Deutschlandradio.

After his talk Arbona will participate in a seminar discussion with members of Gautam Premnath’s graduate seminar English 786, “The Postcolonial Street.” This discussion will be open to interested members of the university community, with prior approval from Professor Premnath. Please contact him at gpremnath@unr.edu if you would like to participate, or if you would like further information about Arbona’s visit.

A lecturer at the California College for the Arts, Javier Arbona holds a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of California, Berkeley. He researches and writes widely on architecture, landscape, space, and culture.

 

View Event Flyer

 

Details:
Date: Tuesday, March 25
Time: 6:30PM
Location: Reynolds School of Journalism, room 101,
University of Nevada, Reno

 

Posted March 03, 2014

The Great Urban Shift: From Metropolitan to Regional Urbanization -- An Open Lecture by Dr. Edward Soja

Dr. Edward Soja

Dr. Edward Soja is a leader in the fields of critical theory, political economy, and cultural geography and is the author of Postmetropolis: Critical Studies of Cities and Regions (2000), Third-space: Journeys to Los Angeles and Other Real-and-Imagined Place (1996), and Postmodern Geographies (1989). His ideas about the relationship between power, politics, and space have drawn the interest of urban planners, environmental- ists, architects, designers, and policy-mak- ers all over the world.

Details:
Date: Saturday, March 8
Time: 4:00-5:00PM
Location: Wells Fargo Auditorium of the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center
University of Nevada, Reno

Special Thanks to:

  • Department of English Public Occassions Committee at the University of Nevada, Reno
  • Gender Race and Identity Program at the University of Nevada, Reno
  • Graduate Student Association at the Unvierstiy of Nevada, Reno
  • The Hilliard Foundation

 

Posted March 03, 2014

An Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference on the Cultural, Social, and Material Implications of Risk

An Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference on the Cultural, Social, and Material Implications of Risk

On the brink of economic, environmental, and political crises, humanity is collectively making decisions in terms of necessary risks for theoretical rewards. As late capitalism balances precariously between explosive growth and crippling depression, people everywhere have adapted themselves to what Foucault called liberalism’s “culture of danger.” The stakes of communication and cultural production have never been higher.

The University of Nevada-Reno English department invites the community to join us as we examine the implications, sources, and functions of risk. Our approach is interdisciplinary, and we will feature papers from scholars of all fields, including literature, cultural studies, history, and the social sciences. Dr. Edward Soja, the renowned cultural geographer, will join us as keynote speaker while we explore this topic.

Conference schedule

Special Thanks to:

  • Department of English Public Occassions Committee at the University of Nevada, Reno
  • Gender Race and Identity Program at the University of Nevada, Reno
  • Graduate Student Association at the Unvierstiy of Nevada, Reno
  • The Hilliard Foundation

 

Posted March 03, 2014

Brain Awareness Week 2014 -- March 11-13

Brain Awareness Week 2014

Brain Awareness Week is the global campaign to increase public awareness of the progress and benefits of brain research. The Integrative Neuroscience Center of Biomedical Research Excellence and the Sierra Nevada Society for Neuroscience present a host of student oriented activities at UNR to celebrate and explore the wonders of the brain.

About Global Brain Awareness Week
Every March, BAW unites the efforts of partner organizations worldwide in a celebration of the brain for people of all ages. Activities are limited only by the organizers' imaginations and include open days at neuroscience labs; exhibitions about the brain; lectures on brain-related topics; social media campaigns; displays at libraries and community centers; classroom workshops; and more.
http://www.sfn.org/baw/
http://www.dana.org/baw/

Posted March 03, 2014

Professor Rasmussen wins Falstaff Award for William Shakespeare and Others: Collaborative Plays

Professor Rasmussen wins Falstaff Award for William Shakespeare and Others: Collaborative Plays

The Falstaff Awards honor the release of William Shakespeare and Others: Collaborative Plays by Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen as the Best Book, Publication, or Recording of 2013. This book pulls together ten apocrypha rarely seen in a single tome. Bate and Rasmussen won the same award in 2007 for their previous collaboration RSC Complete Works for the Royal Shakespeare Company.

 

 

 

Posted February 25 2014

"re-Assemblage: Art and Artifactuality" A Talk by Professor Bill Brown

"re-Assemblage: Art and Artifactuality" A Talk by Professor Bill Brown

University of Chicago Professor Bill Brown gives a public talk titled "re-Assemblage: Art and Artifactuality" at 3:00 PM on Friday, February 21, in the Wells Fargo Auditorium of the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center.

Brown is the author of The Material Unconscious: American Amusement, Stephen Crane, and the Economics of Play (1997) and A Sense of Things: The Object Matter of American Literature (2004) and is well-known for his "thing theory," which borrows from Heidegger's object/thing distinction to look at the role of objects that have become manifest in a way that sets them apart from the world in which they exist. In A Sense of Things Brown analyzes late-19th and early 20th-century America's obsession with material production - with "things" - and the relation of this problem to American literature. In his own words,

"Currently, I work at the intersection of literary, visual, and material cultures, with an emphasis on what I call "object relations in an expanded field." I'm asking how inanimate objects enable human subjects (individually and collectively) to form and transform themselves. How do individuals try to stabilize the "significance" of their lives through the act of collecting? What role do objects play in the formation of gender, sexual, ethnic, and national subjectivity? How are subcultural formations (or projections of cultural form) mediated by objects? What kinds of fetishism have yet to be conceptualized? My approach to such questions makes use of psychoanalysis, materialist phenomenology, aesthetic theory, and the anthropological discourse on the "social life of things." I've tried, in "Thing Theory," to point out how things and thingness might become new objects of critical analysis."

Bill Brown is Edward Carson Waller Distinguished Service Professor of English and the Visual Arts at the University of Chicago.

Details:
Date: Friday, February 21
Time: 3:00PM
Location:Wells Fargo Auditorium of the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center
University of Nevada, Reno

Posted Feburary 18, 2014

Professor Stacy Burton publishes Travel Narrative and the Ends of Modernity

Travel Narrative and the Ends of Modernity

Professor Stacy Burton has published Travel Narrative and the Ends of Modernity with Cambridge University Press. Over the past century, narratives of travel changed in response to modernist and postmodernist literary innovation, world wars, the demise of European empires, and the effect of new technologies and media on travel experience. Yet existing critical studies have not examined fully how the genre changes or theorized why. This study investigates the evolution of Anglophone travel narrative from the 1920s to the present, addressing the work of canonical authors such as T. E. Lawrence, W. H. Auden, and Rebecca West; best-sellers by Peter Fleming and H. V. Morton; and texts by Colin Thubron, Andrew X. Pham, Rosemary Mahoney, and others. It argues that the genre's most important transformation lies in its reinvention as a means of narrating the subjective experience of violence, cultural upheaval, and decline. It will interest scholars and students of travel writing, modernism and postmodernism, English and American literature, and the history and sociology of travel.

Posted February 06, 2014

McGuinness & Seidl Win DQ Creative Writing Awards

Siobhan McGuinness

Siobhain McGuinness, a native of County Monaghan in Ireland who grew up in Lovelock, Nevada, has received the Fall 2013 DQ Award for Poetry. It is her second DQ award. A senior writing major who honed her craft in Steve Gehrke’s poetry workshop and Mark Waldo’s nonfiction class, Siobhain currently triple-majors in Art History and Philosophy. As a result of this combination of studies, she notes, “I am over Aristotle and Beowulf, and enjoy reading Derrida and Camus. I mainly subsist on Mac and cheese and bean and cheese burritos and chai tea, and my name is not pronounced ‘soybean’.” [Editor’s note: we understand it to be pronounced “shuh-VON.”]

In her application for the award, Siobhain submitted a collection of poems titled Obfuscation of the Mind’s Eye. Her poems have been published in the UNR literary journal Brushfire, and she will read from her work at the Sigma Tau Delta English Honors Society International Convention in Savannah, Georgia, February 25- March 2, 2014.

From “Transference in an Hour” –

“Do you have your DBT Behavioral
Analysis Chain?”
She said, motioning for me
to sit down across from her.
The walls of ‘The Therapy Room’ always seemed
to be judging me with their whiteness—
Their untainted purity.
I absently said, “Yes”,
while looking at the video camera,
knowing she would review
the tape at some point in the week,
and handed her the worksheet.


From “Vodka Cranberry, Big-G God” –

I wasn’t sure, but I knew that his supposed
‘sobriety’ smelled a lot like a vodka cranberry
or maybe it was merlot today,
and his leather jacket of hidden
McCormick bottles mixed
with cranappple gave him away 24 hours
too late.


Logan SeidlAlso honored last fall by the DQ selection committee was Logan Seidl, recipient of a fiction award for the short story “Changing Hands.” Logan, a native of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, has spent most of his life in the Reno/Sparks area. Having transferred from Truckee Meadows Community College where he studied with Ana Douglass, Tell Gifford and others, he is now a UNR junior majoring in writing and minoring in Information Systems. This semester Logan is reading and writing fiction and poetry with Chris Coake and Steve Gehrke. He’s already published poems in Crack the Spine, Constellation, and The Meadow.


The DQ Creative Writing Award was founded by longtime Nevada English faculty member Gailmarie Pahmeier and Larry Henry. Each semester a committee of writing faculty invites applications from students in the graduate and undergraduate creative writing workshops. The application deadline for the Spring 2014 awards is set for early March. For more information, contact English Department Scholarship Coordinator Susan Palwick at palwick@unr.edu.

Posted February 06, 2014

Recent grad wins fiction award

Recent grad wins fiction award

Kelsey Mammen, who graduated in December after completing her honors thesis with Curtis Vickers, has won the Western Regional Honors Council Award for Short Fiction from the University of New Mexico journal Scribendi, a nonprofit, annual print publication that publishes creative work from undergraduate honors students from more than 200 institutions in the Western Regional Honors Council (WRHC).

 

 

 

 

 


Posted February 09, 2014

A Reading and Craft Talk talk
by Leni Zumas

A Reading and Craft Talk talk 
by Leni Zumas

Leni Zumas is the author of the story collection Farewell Navigator (Open City) and the novel The Listeners (Tin House), which was a finalist for the 2013 Oregon Book Award. Her work has appeared in Always Apprentices: The Believer Presents Twenty-two Conversations Between Wriers, Quarterly West, Open City, Salt Hill, New Orleans Review, and elsewhere. She has been awarded fellowships by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council and the New York Foundation for the Arts. Zumas is an assistant professor in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at Portland State University. She lives in Portland, Oregon with the artist Luca Diperro and their son.

 

Presented by:
The UNLV Black Mountain Institute and the Department of English

 

Details:
Date: Monday, February 10th
Time: 5:30-6:30PM
Location: Schulich Lecture Hall Room 3
University of Nevada, Reno

 

For further information:
contact Christopher Coake
cjcoake@unr.edu

Posted February 4, 2014

Eric Rasmussen publishes Studying Shakespeare's Contemporaries

Eric Rasmussen and Lars Engle have just published Studying Shakespeare’s Contemporaries, from Wiley Blackwell, an accessible guide to non-Shakespearian English drama of the late 16th and early 17th centuries. Featuring works of prestigious playwrights such as Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Middleton, the authors describe the conditions under which Renaissance plays were commissioned, written, licensed, staged, and published. Plays are organized by theme and explored individually, creating a text that can be read as a complete overview of English Renaissance drama or used as an indexed reference resource. Professor Robert Shaughnessy of Kent University enthuses that the book is "highly readable, thought-provoking in the right ways, and admirably comprehensive in its coverage of the works of Shakespeare's contemporaries."

 

 

Posted January 29, 2014

Professor Justin Gifford's book Pimping Fictions Finalist for the Edgar Allen Poe Award

 

Last week, the Mystery Writers of America announced nominations for the 2014 Edgar Allan Poe award for Best Critical Work of the year. Professor Gifford's book, PImping Fictions: African American Crime Literature and the Untold Story of Black Crime Fiction is a finalist for this prestigious award, and the winner will be announced in New York on May 1st.

 

Gifford Poe Award 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted January 29, 2014

The Dons Duke It Out! Long-Lost Shakespeare Play or Diabolical Forgery?

Gifford Zombie 1

For several years, Dr. Tiffany Stern of Oxford University and Dr. Brean Hammond of the University of Nottingham have been engaged in a vigorous scholarly debate over the issue of whether a play known as Double Falsehood, discovered in the 18th century, may be the work of Shakespeare.
Whereas Professor Hammond is a leading advocate of Shakespeare's authorship and has edited the play for the Arden Shakespeare series, Professor Stern has published detailed arguments that the play is a forgery. To date, their debate has been carried out entirely in print. However, on Tuesday, February 4th, on the UNR campus, the two will meet for the first time for a face-to-face debate.

Details:
Date: Tuesday, February 4th
Time: 7:00PM
Location:Wells Fargo Auditorium, Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center

Posted January 24, 2013

The Nature of Trauma in American Novels

The Nature of Trauma in American Novels

Trauma studies often essentializes experience and identity. Dr. Balaev reveals the flaws of this paradigm by drawing upon a range of psychological theories from Freud to Bartlett that produce several different perspectives to explain the influence of extreme experience upon the self and memory. Taking this broader approach, Balaev argues that trauma has multiple representations and meanings in the novel. Her analysis shows that the value of trauma in literature is created through a combination of contextual factors, such as culture, place, historical era, and landscape, which shape the emotional texture and narrative structure of extreme experience. She examines the heterogeneous depictions of trauma in ecological scenes and cultural landscapes in the novels of Toni Morrison, Lan Cao, Leslie Marmon Silko, Edward Abbey, and Robert Barclay, contending that the diverse representations found in fiction broaden our understanding of the nature of loss and healing.

Michelle Balaev teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in twentieth-century American literature, literary theory, composition and rhetoric, contemporary literature, and ecocriticism. She holds a PhD from the University of Oregon, and her work has been published in PMLA, ISLE, Mosaic: Journal for Interdisciplinary Study of Literature, and The Guardian. Her monograph, The Nature of Trauma in American Novels, was published by Northwestern University Press in 2012.

Made possible by the generous support of the UNR Department of English Public Occasions Committee.

For further information:

Cheryll Glotfelty

glotfelt@unr.edu

682-6395

 

Details:
Date:Friday, January 24, 2014
Time: 4:00PM
Location: Frandsen Humanities, Room 219
UNR Campus

 

Posted January 18, 2014

Fall 2013

Dr. Katherine Toy Miller in television documentary on D. H. Lawrence

Dr. Katherine Toy Miller

Dr. Katherine Toy Miller, Lecturer in the Core Writing Program of the English Department, will appear in a one-hour television documentary on the life of British author D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930) produced as a special for the BBC Two Culture Show which acquired worldwide distribution rights. Filmed in England, the Alps, and New Mexico, “D. H. Lawrence: A Journey Without Shame” will air Saturday, November 23, at 22:15 according to the BBC website. Miller, a permanent resident of Taos, New Mexico, speaks about Lawrence’s interest in the Native Americans of Taos Pueblo as part of his lifelong spiritual quest.

Related to her interest in Lawrence’s observations of the Native Americans of the Southwest, Miller has been asked to write on the roll Lawrence played in the creation of the novel Brave New World by his friend Aldous Huxley, particularly the Savage Reservation section set in New Mexico. Miller’s essay, “Penitentes at the Snake Dance,” about Huxley’s conflation of the Hopi Antelope-Snake Ceremony and the use of flagellation by the lay Catholic Penitentes will appear in Salem Press’s “Critical Insights” series volume on Huxley’s Brave New World (2014).  

 

 

Posted November 20, 2013

UNR alum Claire Watkins wins the Dylan Thomas Prize

UNR alum Claire Watkins wins the Dylan Thomas Prize

Claire Vaye Watkins has been named the 2013 winner of the £30,000 Dylan Thomas Prize for new writers. Judges said she was an "exceptional" writer and described her collection Battleborn as "infectious". The UNR alum was one of seven writers aged under 30 shortlisted for the prize. The prize based in Thomas's birthplace of Swansea is one of the largest literary cash awards in the world

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted November 8, 2013

Professor Rasmussen Publishes Centennial work of Shakespeare Scholarship: William Shakespeare & Others: Collaborative Plays.

William Shakespeare & Others: Collaborative Plays

In partnership with the Royal Shakespeare Company, leading experts Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen present William Shakespeare & Others: Collaborative Plays.

In the companion volume to the UK bestseller The RSC Shakespeare: Complete Works, renowned Shakespeare scholars Jonathan Bate and Eric Rasmussen bring together the fascinatingly varied body of plays that became known as "The Shakespeare Apocrypha" for the first time in over a hundred years, in a beautifully packaged and illustrated collection that is sure to be a must-have for all Shakespeare fans.

 

“A rich collection of early modern plays that are entertaining, exciting and often simply superb.”
-- Peter Holland,
University of Notre Dame, USA

 

Posted November 06, 2013

The Blood, Love, and Rhetoric School reads The School for Scandal

We will gather, divvy up parts, and muddle through this egregiously improper skewering of “polite” 18th-century society. Wigs, fans, false noses, and talent are not required; only enthusiasm is compulsory.

RSVP:

request a PDF of the script, ask for directions, and/or call dibs on a part to James Mardock at jmardock@unr.edu.

The Blood, Love, and Rhetoric School reads The School for Scandal

Details:

Date: Thursday, November 21th
Time: 7:00PM
Location: 1080 Mount Rose

 

Posted November 20, 2013

The Politics of Apocalypse: Why Zombies Matter to the Future of the Humanities

Gifford Zombie 1

Professor Justin Gifford—Jean Sanford Distinguished Professor in the Humanitieswill give a lecture in the Jot Travis Building, Room 100 on Tuesday November 19th at 4p.m.

Zombies have infected every aspect of American popular culture.  We can find them roaming apocalyptic landscapes in film and television, video games, literature, and even political theory.  They are the subjects of conference papers and Gifford Zombie 2PhD dissertations, academic articles and NY York Times bestselling books.  Although the figure of the zombie has been circulating in mass culture since the 1920s and 1930s, the twenty-first century has witnessed an unprecedented outbreak of apocalypse-related art and cultural production.

Professor Justin Gifford examines this zombie renaissance as a symbolic struggle with the crises of our times: economic collapse, ecological decay, persistent race hatred, the industrialization of the food industry, a broken health care system, and an empty consumer culture.  The zombie apocalypse narrative has emerged as an important medium through which we understand these catastrophes.

Gifford Zombie 3Professor Gifford provides a genealogy of the zombie canon, and he illuminates ways we might read the stories of walking dead as potent allegories for the political and social divides that we face in America in the twenty-first century.

 

Details:
Date: Tuesday, November 19th
Time: 4:00PM
Location:Jot Travis Building, Room 100

Posted November 05, 2013

Shakespeare Beyond Doubt named "Book of the Year"

Mending the Moon

Shakespeare Beyond Doubt: Evidence, Argument, Controversy (Cambridge University Press) has been named a "Book of the Year" by both the Times Literary Supplement and the journal History Today. In announcing the winners in History Today, the noted Victorian scholar Judith Flanders singled out the chapter written by Professors James Mardock and Eric Rasmussen as her favorite in the collection which she characterized as "thorough, rigorous, scholarly -- and a lot of fun."

Details:

Date: Wednesday, November 20th

Time: 6:30 - 7:30 PM

Location: Sundance Books
121 California Ave Reno, NV 89509
(775) 786-1188

Posted November 05, 2013

 

Ann Keniston gives a reading from her New Chapbook November Wasps: Elegies

Mending the Moon

November Wasps: Elegies is a sequence of 24 poems, written over the seven years since the death of Keniston’s mother, chronicles a process of grieving that moves from anticipation through shock to reflection and distance. A deeply personal chronicle of Keniston’s relationship with her beloved but deeply private mother, the volume is also an attempt to make sense of larger mysteries of loss, grieving, and absence. In “Egret,” the opening poem, an egret glimpsed at Virginia Lake amid “leaves [that] have gotten loose, / their stems having grown brittler over weeks” recalls the poet’s act of “lifting up my weightless  mother / to set her down.” The late-season wasps of the title poem “thrust[ing] at the window glass” offer an analogy for the poet’s attempt to “excise the easy, early moves of grief, / to make things harsher.”

Local poet and fellow UNR professor Steve Gehrke offers this praise: “November Wasps takes grief apart and examines it in all its intricacies and contradictions. It's a book that balances absence and presence, grief and love, loss and praise. Keniston strips away all clutter and superficial ornamentation to create poems of exactness and hard-earned clarity. While the first-person speaker is everywhere, there is an ethical and rigorous detachment, a rejection of self-pity that creates the sense of powerful feeling being held in check. It’s the intensity of that feeling that draws us to the poems, but it’s the holding back that devastates. November Wasps is a book of aching and mesmerizing truth.”

Details:

Date: Wednesday, November 20th

Time: 6:30 - 7:30 PM

Location: Sundance Books
121 California Ave Reno, NV 89509
(775) 786-1188

Posted November 05, 2013

 

Alumnus Colin Robertson curates exhsibition at the Nevada Museum of Art

Image by: Jamie Kingham Alumnus Colin Robertson curates exhibition at the Nevada Museum of Art

From July 27 through October 13, 2013, Colin Robertson, Curator of Education and Modernist Maverick, curated "Modernist Maverick: The Architecture of William L. Pereira" at the Nevada Museum of Art.

The exhibition celebrates and critically examines Pereira’s efforts to plan and design sustainable places in the midst of California’s tumultuous mid-twentieth century growth. Organized by the Nevada Museum of Art, Modernist Maverick surveys Pereira’s architecture, urban planning, and design work through photography, architectural models, drawings, plans and artwork.

Colin also authored an essay in the catalogue that accompanied the exhibition.

 

 

Posted October 16, 2013

Chris Coake to receive Silver Pen Award at Nevada Writers Hall of Fame Ceremony

Chris Coake to receive Silver Pen Award at Nevada Writers Hall of Fame Ceremony

Christopher Coake’s powerful first novel, You Came Back (2012), is a compelling journey through the human heart. His collection of short stories, We’re in Trouble (2005), won the PEN/Robert Bingham Fellowship for a first work of fiction. In 2007 he was named a “Best Young American Novelist” by the prestigious literary journal GRANTA.

Coake’s stories have been published in several literary journals and anthologized in Best American History Stories 2004 and The Best American Noir of the Century. A native of Indiana, Coake received an M. F. A. in Creative Writing (Fiction) from Ohio State University, an M. A. in Creative Writing from Miami University of Ohio, and a B. A. in Secondary Education from Ball State University. He has been a member of the English faculty at the University of Nevada, Reno since 2005, where he teaches creative writing.

Professor Chris Coake will be honored at the 26th annual Nevada Writers Hall of Fame reception and ceremony with the Silver Pen Award. 7:00 PM on November 14, 2012,at Wells Fargo Auditorium in the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center.

Details:

Date: Friday, November 15th
Time: 7:00PM
Location: Wells Fargo Auditorium in the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center,
UNR Campus

 

Posted October 15, 2013

A reading by Tupelo Hassman

Hassman Reading 5/6

Tupelo Hassman is a fresh and genuine new voice in fiction. Hassman, who grew up outside Reno, will read from her poignant, startling and uncompromising debut novel, girlchild, (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), which is being released in paperback in 2013 by Picador.

Her work has appeared in The Arroyo Review Literary Journal, The Boston Globe, Harper's Bazaar, The Independent, The Portland Review Literary Journal, sPARKLE & bLINK, We Still Like, and ZYZZYVA, among other venues. Hassman received her MFA from Columbia and is the first American ever to win London's Literary Death Match. She currently lives in San Francisco's East Bay.

Hassman Reading 5/6Made possible by the generous support of the UNR Department of English Public Occasions Committee.

 

For further information:
Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

 

Details:
Date: Wednesday, November 13th
Time: 4:00PM
Location: MIKC #422,
UNR Campus

Posted November 05, 2013

Professor Lynda Walsh Delivers a talk on Earth's Prophets

Dufresne

Lynda Walsh's new book Scientists as Prophets: A Rhetorical Genealogy (Oxford, 2013) tracks a persistent strand in the cultural authority of science advisers—prophetic ethos. In this talk, Lynda will review the rhetorical strategies that scientists leverage to position themselves as the Earth's prophets: performed compulsion, lament, synoptic visualization, and the myth of natural inscription. Illustrative examples are drawn from Silent Spring, Cosmos, the IPCC's Climate Change 2007 report (AR4), and Climategate. The argument: prophetic ethos ironically reveals nature while setting it beyond the reach of lay people. However, when we recognize the true function of prophecy—which is not the revelation of certain knowledge but rather the opening of a dialogue that can lead to political certainty—we can better appreciate the role of scientist-prophets in environmental debates.

 

Lynda Walsh studies the rhetoric of science—specifically science popularization—as well as non-Western rhetorics and the pragmatics of reception. She teaches a range of courses in rhetorical theory and history, and professional writing. Her first monograph was Sins Against Science: The Scientific Hoaxes of Poe, Twain, and Others (SUNY, 2006).

The UNR English Department presents a public lecture

For further information:
Cheryll Glotfelty
775-682-6395
glotfelt@unr.edu

 

 

Details:

Date: Friday, November 1st
Time: 4:00PM
Location: FH 107,
UNR Campus

Posted October 25, 2013

A reading by John Dufresne

Dufresne

John Dufresne is the author of five novels -
Louisiana Power & Light, Love Warps the Mind
a Little
, (both New York Times Notable Books of
the Year) Deep in the Shade of Paradise,
Requiem, Mass., and No Regrets, Coyote.  

John has also written two short story collections –
The Way That Water Enters Stone and Johnny Too Bad, two books on writing and creativity, The Lie That Tells a Truth: a Guide to Writing Fiction and Is Life Like This?: a Guide to Writing Your First Novel in Six Months.

He also wrote the screenplay for the award-winning short film The Freezer Jesus, and
co-wrote the screenplay for To Live and Die in Dixie with Don Papy.

John is a 2012-13 Guggenheim Fellow and teaches in the MFA program at Florida International University in Miami.

 

No Regrets, CoyoteMade possible by the generous support of the UNR Department of English Public Occasions Committee.

 

For further information:
Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

 

Details:

Date: Thursday, October 10th
Time: 5:30PM
Location: MIKC #422,
UNR Campus

Posted October 03, 2013

Professor Gifford interviewed for Documentary Iceberg Slim: Portrait of a Pimp

Iceberg Slim: Portrait of a Pimp

Professor Justin Gifford appears as a literary expert in documentary, Iceberg Slim: Portrait of a Pimp, released this week on DVD. Produced by Ice-T and directed by his longtime manager Jorge Hinojosa, the film features interviews with Dr. Gifford, alongside Snoop Dogg, Quincy Jones, Chris Rock, and Henry Rollins. The film has won awards at the Pan African Film Festival and the San Francisco Independent film festival, and it has received rave reviews in Entertainment Weekly, the Los Angeles Times, and Variety. Dr. Gifford's collection of rare black crime novels were also used extensively to create a pulp fiction visual style. You can see a large selection of titles these titles at Dr. Gifford's facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/justin.gifford.545.

 

 

Posted September 06, 2013

novelist and memoirist Michelle Herman Gives a Reading

Michelle Herman

Michelle Herman is the author of the novels Missing and Dog, the collection of novellas A New and Glorious Life, and the essay collections The Middle of Everything and Stories We Tell Ourselves.  Other essays and short fiction have appeared in American ScholarO, the Oprah Magazine, The Southern Review, and many other journals. Her awards and honors include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a James Michener Fellowship, numerous individual artist’s fellowships from the Ohio Arts Council and the Greater Columbus Arts Council, and two major teaching awards—the University Distinguished Teaching Award and the Rodica Botoman Award for Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching and Mentoring—from Ohio State, where she has taught since 1988, and where she directs the MFA Program in Creative Writing and the Graduate Interdisciplinary Specialization in Fine Arts, as well as a summer program for teenage writers, the Young Writers Workshop.  A New Yorker by birth as well as temperament, she lives in Columbus with her husband, the painter Glen Holland, and their daughter.

Details:

Date: Monday, September 9th

Time: 6:00 PM

Location: Ansari Business 106
University of Nevada, Reno

Posted September 06, 2013

Professor Lynda Walsh publishes Scientists as Prophets: A Rhetorical Genealogy with Oxford University Press

Scientists as Prophets

Professor Lynda Walsh publishes Scientists as Prophets: A Rhetorical Genealogy with Oxford University Press

 Professor Lynda Walsh’s new book, Scientists as Prophets: A Rhetorical Genealogy, published by Oxford University Press, articulates the largely unexamined function of the scientist-prophet equation in historical and present-day debates.

Early praise for the book includes that of Davida Charney, Professor of Rhetoric and Writing at the University of Texas at Austin, who enthuses that "on contentious issues like climate change and the teaching of evolution in schools, public officials seek out scientific advisers for guidance, oftentimes pulling scientists into the spotlight away from their comfort zones. Some win widespread acclaim for their efforts to shape public policy, while others are denounced as subverters of traditional values. In Scientists as Prophets, Lynda Walsh shows that across history-Francis Bacon, Robert Boyle, Rachel Carson, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Steven Jay Gould, Carl Sagan-scientists who venture into public policy arenas are immersed in the discourse of prophecy. In this ambitious and insightful book, Walsh raises our appreciation of prophecy as a pragmatic and rational genre for experts doing their best to interpret the unknowable."

Carolyn R. Miller, SAS Institute Distinguished Professor of Rhetoric and Technical Communication, North Carolina State University, observes that "Walsh shows that the prophetic function of the science adviser is as old as science itself, not a contemporary add-on. She uses an ingenious adaptation of Kenneth Burke's Pentad to trace its history and to show how the prophetic ethos has shaped contemporary controversies over nuclear security, pesticides, and global warming. The work is deeply informed, engagingly written, and convincingly argued; it enriches our understanding of the rhetoric of science and of the relations between science and the polity."

Posted August 26, 2013

Chris Coake to receive Silver Pen Award at Nevada Writers Hall of Fame Ceremony

Chris Coake to receive Silver Pen Award at Nevada Writers Hall of Fame Ceremony

Christopher Coake’s powerful first novel, You Came Back (2012), is a compelling journey through the human heart. His collection of short stories, We’re in Trouble (2005), won the PEN/Robert Bingham Fellowship for a first work of fiction. In 2007 he was named a “Best Young American Novelist” by the prestigious literary journal GRANTA.

Coake’s stories have been published in several literary journals and anthologized in Best American History Stories 2004 and The Best American Noir of the Century. A native of Indiana, Coake received an M. F. A. in Creative Writing (Fiction) from Ohio State University, an M. A. in Creative Writing from Miami University of Ohio, and a B. A. in Secondary Education from Ball State University. He has been a member of the English faculty at the University of Nevada, Reno since 2005, where he teaches creative writing.

 

 

Posted September 5, 2013

James Mardock to appear on Jeopardy

James Mardock on Jeopardy

Professor James Mardock will appear as a contestant on “Jeopardy” in the premier episode of the show’s new season to be aired on Monday, September 16, at 7:00 PM on KOLO-TV, Channel 8. The selection process required the successful completion of numerous qualifying tests, auditions, and interviews over a period of many months. From among the tens of thousands of applicants, James was selected to be among the elite few who appear on the show. Go, James!

 

 

Posted September 5, 2013

UNR Linguistics Club Gets Rolling for 2013-14a

Professor Walsh and Alum Kenny Walker win Article of the Year Award

The UNR Linguistics Club, an undergraduate organization comprised mostly of English Language & Linguistics s, has elected a new slate of officers and is planning another year of events centered around the activity all humans (and many non-humans) share in common: language.
Mentored by Professor Erika Varis of the English Department, the club in past years has invited prominent speakers in the field of language studies, gathered to discuss readings and films, shared information on internships and conference opportunities, and even traveled as a group to Oaxaca, Mexico to present papers on Zapotec at an indigenous language conference.
This year’s events include a series called “Lectures on Linguistics,” bringing speakers from on and off campus to talk about recent research. The club also plans a series of language demonstration and Q&A sessions with native speakers of various non-English languages, and more foreign language movie nights.

    The first Lecture on Linguistics will be presented by Dr. Varis herself, titled "Masculine or Feminine Water? The Syntax-Phonology Interface" on Friday, October 18th at 10:00 AM in MS 227.

    The first movie night, on Wednesday, October 23th at 8:00 PM, will feature Mostly Martha, a German-language film about a headstrong chef whose life gets shaken up when her best friend suddenly dies, leaving a young daughter in her care.

In addition to these events, the club plans a fundraising bake sale on Halloween, offering succulent sweets and gourmet coffee to the masses, and will soon be selling UNR Linguistics T-shirts.  According to Dr. Varis, “I think this year is going to be one of the best for the Linguistics Club. Our members are enthusiastic and full of great ideas for bringing awareness of language and linguistics to the greater UNR community, in a fun and engaging way. “
Nicole Hicks, the club’s webmaster, adds that the club’s website is located at http://unrlinguistics.com and contains regularly updated event information. The Linguistics Club also maintains an informational email list, which anyone can join with a request to info@unrlinguistics.com. “And last but not least,” says Hicks, “like the club on Facebook!”

 

 

Posted August 26, 2013

Professor Walsh and Alum Kenny Walker win Article of the Year Award

Professor Walsh and Alum Kenny Walker win Article of the Year Award

The Association for the Rhetoric of Science and Technology's conferred its Article of the Year Award to UNR English alum Kenny Walker and Professor Lynda Walsh for their co-authored "'No One Yet Knows What the Ultimate Consequences May Be': How Rachel Carson Transformed Scientific Uncertainty into a Site for Public Participation in Silent Spring," published in the February 2012 issue of the Journal of Business and Technical Communication.

 

The ARST Article of the Year awards recognizes an essay published in the previous calendar year that stands out for its extension of theoretical and practical knowledge of the rhetoric of science, technology, and medicine (ROSTM), that can foster cross-disciplinary interest in ROSTM studies, and that has the potential to teach future generations of scholars about rhetorical aspects of science, technology, and medicine.

 

 

Posted August 26, 2013

Professor Eric Rasmussen featured in The New York Times

Professor Eric Rasmussen featured in The New York Times

Eric Rasmussen was featured in a front-page article in The New York Time discussing the attribution of parts of a new play to Shakespeare. Recent work by Rasmussen’s colleague Douglas Bruster at the University of Texas at Austin helps to confirm that several passages of The Spanish Tragedy were probably written by Shakespeare. Rasmussen and Jonathan Bate will include The Spanish Tragedy in their forthcoming edition of Shakespeare’s Collaborative Plays to be published by Macmillan this fall.

Read the full article here: <http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/13/arts/further-proof-of-shakespeares-hand-in-the-spanish-tragedy.html?hp&_r=0>

 

 

 

 

 

Posted August 12, 2013

Stacy Burton named Vice Provost, Faculty Affairs

Anthony Barcellos reads from Land of Milk and Money 4/25

Congratulations to Professor Stacy Burton, who has been named Vice Provost, Faculty Affairs.  In this role Professor Burton will oversee activities in support of faculty hiring, development, and leadership at the University of Nevada, Reno. Her responsibilities will also include overseeing the Equal Opportunity and Title IX Office and chairing the Facilities Resource Committee.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted July 18, 2013

Professor Eric Rasmussen wins Falstaff Award

Eric Rasmussen

Eric Rasmussen's monumental reference work, The Shakespeare First Folios: A Descriptive Catalogue (Palgrave Macmillan), which he co-edited with UNR graduate students Mark Farnsworth, Lara Hansen, Trey Jansen, Sarah Stewart, and adjunct faculty member Don Bailey, has received the Falstaff Award for Best Publication, Book, or Recording of 2012 (http://www.playshakespeare
.com/falstaff-awards
). Other award-winners this year include Steve Martin, who was recognized for the musical score that he wrote for the New York "Shakespeare in the Park" production of As You Like It, and Sir Ian McKellen, who received a lifetime achievement award.

 

Posted July 18, 2013

Professor Keniston Publishes November Wasps: Elegies

Ellen Klages

This summer, Finishing Line Press is publishing November Wasps: Elegies by Ann Keniston, Reno resident and English professor at UNR since 2002. This sequence of 24 poems, written over the seven years since the death of Keniston’s mother, chronicles a process of grieving that moves from anticipation through shock to reflection and distance. A deeply personal chronicle of Keniston’s relationship with her beloved but deeply private mother, the volume is also an attempt to make sense of larger mysteries of loss, grieving, and absence. In “Egret,” the opening poem, an egret glimpsed at Virginia Lake amid “leaves [that] have gotten loose, / their stems having grown brittler over weeks” recalls the poet’s act of “lifting up my weightless  mother / to set her down.” The late-season wasps of the title poem “thrust[ing] at the window glass” offer an analogy for the poet’s attempt to “excise the easy, early moves of grief, / to make things harsher.”

Local poet and fellow UNR professor Steve Gehrke offers this praise: “November Wasps takes grief apart and examines it in all its intricacies and contradictions. It's a book that balances absence and presence, grief and love, loss and praise. Keniston strips away all clutter and superficial ornamentation to create poems of exactness and hard-earned clarity. While the first-person speaker is everywhere, there is an ethical and rigorous detachment, a rejection of self-pity that creates the sense of powerful feeling being held in check. It’s the intensity of that feeling that draws us to the poems, but it’s the holding back that devastates. November Wasps is a book of aching and mesmerizing truth.”

The book ($12) is available for preorder now from Finishing Line Press. After its publication in late August, it will be available at Sundance Books.

Ann Keniston is the author of the 2005 poetry collection, The Caution of Human Gestures, praised for its “superb match” between “transparency of word” and “density of thought” (Tom Sleigh) and a voice “at once piercing and unflinchingly objective” (Gail Mazur). Her poems have appeared in Antioch Review, Interim, Kenyon Review, Missouri Review Online, Southwest Review, and elsewhere, and she has received grants from Reno’s Sierra Arts Foundation and the Nevada Arts Council. Originally from the Boston area, she has taught English at UNR for eleven years. Coeditor of The New American Poetry of Engagement: A 21st Century Anthology as well as a scholar of contemporary American poetry, she lives in Reno with her husband and two teenage sons. More information about her publications can be found at: http://keniston.blogs.unr.edu

 

 

Posted June 9, 2013

Professor Ashley Marshall Publishes The Practice of Satire in England, 1658-1770

Professor Ashley Marshall Publishes The Practice of Satire in England, 1658-1770

Congratulations to Professor Ashley Marshall on the publication of her new book, The Practice of Satire in England, 1658-1770, from the Johns Hopkins University Press. Thomas Lockwood of the University of Washington enthuses that "this is a remarkable work of scholarship: a revaluation of the whole idea and scope of satire as actually produced in the Restoration and eighteenth century. These chapters are notable for their command of this material, their analytical depth, their nuanced reading of the historical character of satire over generational passages of time, and their clear-sighted power of synthesis in putting all this disorderly mass of material before the reader in such vivid form. I do not see how any serious scholarship on satire will be able to proceed henceforth without reference to Marshall's book." Howard Weinbrot of the University of Wisconsin is similarly effusive in his praise: "The study is important, persuasive, lively, learned, and a major advance upon scholarship concerning English satiric theory and practice from 1658 to 1770."

 

Posted April 25, 2013

Book Launch: Mending the Moon by Susan Palwick

Mending the Moon

Melinda Soto, aged sixty-four, vacationing in Mexico, is murdered by a fellow American tourist. Back in her hometown of Reno, Nevada, she leaves behind her adopted son, Jeremy, whom she rescued from war-torn Guatemala when he was a toddler—just one of her many causes over the years. And she leaves behind a circle of friends: Veronique, the academic stuck in a teaching job from which she can't retire; Rosemary, who's losing her husband to Alzheimer's and who's trying to lose herself in volunteer work; Henrietta, the priest at Rosemary's and Melinda's church.

Jeremy already had a fraught relationship with his charismatic mother and the people in her orbit. Now her death is tearing him apart, and he can barely stand the rituals of remembrance that ensue among his mother’s friends. Then the police reveal who killed Melinda:  a young man who flew home to his parents in Seattle and drowned himself just days later.

It's too much. Jeremy's not the only one who can't deal. Friendships fray. But the unexpected happens: an invitation to them all, from the murderer's mother, to come to Seattle for his memorial. It's ridiculous. And yet, somehow, each of them begins to see in it a chance to heal. Aided, in peculiar ways, by Jeremy's years-long obsession with the comic-book hero Comrade Cosmos, and the immense cult of online commentary it's spawned.

Shot through with feeling and inventiveness, this is a novel of the odd paths that lead to home.

Praise

"Reminiscent of Gail Godwin and Madeleine L'Engle, this is a brave and brilliant book."
--Jo Walton on Mending the Moon

"Award-winning fantasy author Palwick has written a haunting tale of family, friendship, and the philosophy of loss that will stimulate book club discussions."
--Library Journal on Mending the Moon

About Susan Palwick

Susan Palwick's debut novel, Flying in Place, won the Crawford Award for best fantasy debut. Her second novel, The Necessary Beggar, won the American Library Association’s Alex Award. She lives with her husband in Reno, Nevada.

Details:

Date: Monday, May 14th

Time: 6:30 - 8:00 PM

Location: Sundance Books
121 California Ave Reno, NV 89509
(775) 786-1188

Posted April 24, 2013

Spring 2013

Professors Mardock and Rasmussen contribute to Shakespeare Beyond Doubt

Hassman Reading 5/6

Professors James Mardock and Eric Rasmussen have published a co-authored essay in the Cambridge University Press collection Shakespeare Beyond Doubt: Evidence, Argument, Controversy, which is receiving rave reviews: "The Shakespeare debate has never been hotter" (London Evening Standard). "Irrefutable evidence that Shakespeare really was Shakespeare" (The New Statesman). James Shapiro of Columbia University observes that "Until now no book has provided the comprehensive evidence necessary to satisfy those 'Reasonable Doubters'."

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted May 08, 2013

A reading by Tupelo Hassman

Hassman Reading 5/6

***Due to a family emergency, Tupelo Hassman has had to cancel her reading on Monday, May 6th.

We will work with the author to re-schedule her reading at a later date.

Our apologies for any inconvenience and we'll keep you apprised of a new date for the reading.***

Tupelo Hassman is a fresh and genuine new voice in fiction. Hassman, who grew up outside Reno, will read from her poignant, startling and uncompromising debut novel, girlchild, (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), which is being released in paperback in 2013 by Picador.

Her work has appeared in The Arroyo Review Literary Journal, The Boston Globe, Harper's Bazaar, The Independent, The Portland Review Literary Journal, sPARKLE & bLINK, We Still Like, and ZYZZYVA, among other venues. Hassman received her MFA from Columbia and is the first American ever to win London's Literary Death Match. She currently lives in San Francisco's East Bay.

Hassman Reading 5/6Made possible by the generous support of the UNR Department of English Public Occasions Committee.

 

For further information:
Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

 

Details:

Date: Wednesday, May 6th
Time: 5:30PM
Location: MIKC #422,
UNR Campus

Posted April 29, 2013

Reception to Honor Professor Coake, winner of this year's Mousel-Feltner Award for Excellence in Research and/or Creative Activity

Anthony Barcellos reads from Land of Milk and Money 4/25

We are pleased to congratulate Professor Coake, winner of this year's Mousel-Feltner Award for Excellence in Research and/or Creative Activity. Please join us for a reception to honor Chris and other College of Liberal Arts award recipients:

Details:

Date: Wednesday, May 1st

Time: 4:00

Location: Graduate / Faculty Reading Room (#422) in the Knowledge Center
University of Nevada, Reno Campus

 

 

Posted April 26, 2013

A Reading by Ellen Klages

Ellen Klages

Ellen Klages has published two award-winning novels and a story collection. The Green Glass Sea, her first novel, was the 2007 winner of the Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction, the 2007 winner of the New Mexico Book Award in the Young Adult category, and the 2007 winner of the Judy Lopez Award for Children’s Literature. It was also a finalist for the Quill Award, the Northern California Book Award, and the Locus Award for Best First Novel. The book was #1 on the BookSense Winter 2006/2007 Children’s Picks List and was 2009’s One Book for Nebraska Kids.

White Sands, Red Menace, the sequel to The Green Glass Sea, won a Gold Medal in the Young Adult category of the 2009 California Book Awards. In addition, Klages won the 2005 Nebula Award for her story “Basement Magic.” She has also been a finalist for the Hugo, Spectrum, World Fantasy, and Campbell Awards, and for the Rebecca Caudill Young Readers Book Award.

Made possible by the generous support of the UNR Department of English Public Occasions Committee and the Hilliard Endowment Fund.

For further information:
Susan Palwick
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6389
palwick@unr.edu

 

Details:

Date: Wednesday, May 1st

Time: 5:30-7:00 PM

Location: Frandsen Humanities Rm #107,
UNR Campus

Posted April 24, 2013

Professor Eric Rasmussen has been named a Foundation Professor

Eric Rasmussen

Many of you have already heard the excellent news that Professor Eric Rasmussen has been named a Foundation Professor. Please mark your calendars to join us to celebrate Eric's award. Eric will receive this honor at the Honor the Best ceremony, which will be held on Tuesday, May 14, at 3:00 p.m. in the Joe Crowley Student Union Ballroom. Join us if you can!

Details:

Date:Tuesday, May 14th

Time: 3:00 PM

Location: Joe Crowley Student Union Ballroom

 

 

 

Posted April 24, 2013

Hey It’s 2013 Already! Why Bother with Books?

Paul Gehl

Paul Gehl of Chicago's Newberry Library is a specialist on book history. In this illustrated talk he will discuss how the physical characteristics of books --whether paper or electronic-- affect our sense of their place in history and society, and what they tell us about the human beings (including of course ourselves) who have read them across the last one thousand years. He will introduce us to a Florentine merchant of the early Renaissance, a schoolmaster in baroque Rome, a decidedly outsider artist in 1910 Prague, and some radical readers of today.

Details:

Date: Monday, April 29th

Time: 7:00 PM

Location: JCSU Theater.

 

Posted April 24, 2013

"…and don’t f@&$ it up!": Rupaul’s Drag Race and the Gay Marriage Debate

Dr. Justin Gifford—
Jean Sanford Distguished Professor
in the Humanities—
will give a public lecture:

 

Gifford Lecture 4/25

America is currently witnessing a sweeping transformation in its attitudes toward gay civil liberties.  Ten years ago, there was not a single state in which gay marriage was legal; now it is recognized in nine states as well as the District of Columbia.  The Supreme Court is currently deciding two historic cases—Hollingsworth v. Perry and United States v. Windsor—in order to determine the constitutionality of bans on gay marriage and the denial of benefits to gay couples.  It appears we are on the cusp of a significant social revolution not witnessed since the tumultuous 1960s.

Gifford Lecture 4/25

 

What can account for this dramatic and seemingly uncharacteristic shift in America’s attitude toward gay marriage and gay people more broadly?  After all, it was only in 1996 that Bill Clinton signed into law the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which restricts federal marriage benefits to opposite-sex marriages.

 

Gifford Lecture 4/25

 

Professor Justin Gifford explores how gay-oriented reality television has contributed to this cultural turn.  Paying particular attention to the underground sensation Rupaul’s Drag Race—an elimination-style competition program with drag queens—Gifford investigates the power of entertainment and social media to effect social change.

 

Details:

Date: Thursday, April 25th

Time: 4:00PM

Location: RSJ 101

Posted April 19, 2013

Anthony Barcellos reads from Land of Milk and Money 4/25

Anthony Barcellos reads from Land of Milk and Money 4/25

Land of Milk and Money is the story of the Francisco family, Portuguese immigrants from the Azores who settle on a dairy farm in California's Central Valley. Their plans to eventually return to the Old Country fall by the wayside as their success grows and their American lives take root. The legacy of one generation be- comes a point of contention as the members of the next generation begin to compete to inherit and control their heritage, which includes herds of cattle and tracts of farm land. Land of Milk and Money documents an era in which man and nature transformed each other as water turned a sprawling desert valley into the nation’s greatest food basket.

Vamberto Freitas of University of the Azores regards Anthony Barcellos's Land of Milk and Money as “[t]he first great Portuguese-American novel to fully bring to life a whole way of life and history in California. Steinbeck, believe me, would be jealous.”

The author's sister, on the other hand, worries that he's "going to get into a lot of trouble."

Special thanks to the Public Occasions Committtee of the English Department at the University of Nevada, Reno for sponsoring the reading.

Please email any questions to Paul Knox <paulk@unr.edu>

Details:

Date: Thursday, April 25th

Time: 4:00 - 5:30 PM

Location: Graduate / Faculty Reading Room (#422) in the Knowledge Center
University of Nevada, Reno Campus

 

Posted April 18, 2013

Poetry Reading:
Steve Gehrke, William Wilborn, & Steven Nightingale

Join us Wednesday, April 24 at 6:30 p.m., for an evening of poetry with Steve Gehrke , William Wilborn, and Steven Nightingale. This evening is part of Sundance Books and Music's month long celebration of National Poetry Month.

 

Steve Gehrke

Steve Gehrke

Steve Gehrke has published three books, most recently Michelangelo’s Seizure, which was selected for the National Poetry Series and published by University of Illinois Press in 2007. His other books are The Pyramids of Malpighi (Anhinga), and The Resurrection Machine (BkMk), winner of the John Ciardi Prize. His work has appeared or is forthcoming at AGNI, Poetry, Shenandoah, VQR and many others. He teaches at the University of Nevada-Reno.

 

 

 

William Wilborn

William Wilborn

I'm a bit of collateral damage from WWII. Raised in Bonner, Montana, by my grandparents. Devoted to words from the beginning. Went to high school and college in Missoula, MT, California and Ithaca, NY. I taught at UNR for 28 years. I regard poetry as something hard to do, a craft before it is an art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven Nightingale

Steven Nightingale

Steven Nightingale is the author of two novels, The Lost Coast and Thirteenth Daughter of the Moon, and several books of poetry including The Light in Them is Permanent, Planetary Tambourine, Cartwheels, Cinnamon Theologies and The Golden Pilgrimage.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, please go to Sundance Book's Webpage.

Details:

Date: Wednesday, April 24th

Time: 6:30PM

Location: Sundance Books
121 California Ave Reno, NV 89509
(775) 786-1188

Posted April 18, 2013

Poetry Reading:
Laura Wetherington & Jared Stanley 4/22

Laura WetheringtonLaura Wetherington

Laura Wetherington grew up in Incline Village and now works at Sierra Nevada College. Her first book, A Map Predetermined and Chance (Fence 2011), was selected by C.S. Giscombe for the National Poetry Series. Recent work includes poems in The Minnesota Review, Drunken Boat, and The Sonnets: Translating and Rewriting Shakespeare (Nightboat 2013). Wetherington co-founded and currently edits textsound.org.

 

 

 

Jared StanleyJared Stanley

Jared Stanley is the author of The Weeds, Book Made of Forest and four chapbooks, including How the Desert Did Me In. He co-edits Mrs. Maybe, and is a member of the collaborative public art team Unmanned Minerals. He is a 2012-2014 Research Fellow at the Center for Art + Environment at the Nevada Museum of Art, and teaches at Sierra Nevada College in Incline Village, NV. Stanley lives in Reno, Nevada.

 

Sponsored by the English Departmentʼs Public Occasionʼs Committee

 

Details:

Date: Monday, April 22th

Time: 6:00 - 7:30 PM

Location: The Great Room, Joe Crowley Student Union
University of Nevada, Reno Campus

Posted April 18, 2013

PHILOSOPHERS RESPONDING
TO NATURE

Achtenbert Reading 4-19

Do we master nature? Do we force her to give up her secrets? Or is our relation to nature more like piety? Not a form of making but of responding? These and related ideas will be considered in the thought of Plato, Aristotle, Bacon, Descartes, Heidegger, Levinas and Derrida.

Deborah Achtenberg is Associate Professor of philosophy at UNR. She holds a PhD from the New School of Social Research. She is the author of Cognition of Value in Aristotle’s Ethics (SUNY Press) and Essential Vulnerabilities: Plato and Levinas on Relations to the Other (under contract).

This lecture is sponsored by the Literature and Environment graduate committee in English at UNR.

For more information, please contact Cheryll Glotfelty <glotfelt@unr.edu> 682-6395

Details:

Date: Friday, April 19th

Time: 4:00-5:30 PM

Location: Frandsen Humanities,
Rm 129, UNR Campus

Posted April 1, 2013

UNR Linguistics Club Colloquium

Linguistics ClubMary Byram --
Focus in English: a case study in the limits of linguistic knowledge


Our guest speaker is Mary Byram, a PhD candidate from the Linguistics Department of the University of Southern California. Her work primarily examines focus phenomena in English, spanning the linguistic subfields of syntax, semantics, psycholinguistics, and prosody.

Abstract:

Focus in English: a case study in the limits of linguistic knowledge

Mary Byram Washburn
University of Southern California

Focus is a special intonational contour in English that affects every part of how we produce and understand language.  For instance, it affects meaning.  Example (1a) below means that the only thing John watches are movies (not soap operas or gameshows), but (2) means that the only thing John does with movies is watch them (not write them or direct them).

1)    John only watches MOVIES.

2)    John only WATCHES movies.  

Focus affects word order.  Example (3) below is a little strange, but if cup is focused, as in (4), the sentence becomes acceptable.  

3)    ?Give the sailor who has just come from a distant land the cup.

4)    Give the sailor who has just come from a distant land the CUP.  

Focus even affects how we think.  In example (5) below, it isn't clear whether who refers to the person making the claim or the person who was fired, but focus in (6) resolves this ambiguity.

5)    Somebody claims that the president fired someone, but no one knows who. 6)    Somebody claims that the president fired someone, but no one knows who.

(Frazier and Clifton 1998)       

Despite how important focus is, though, we know very little about it.  In this talk, I will outline some of what we do know about focus, but also what we do not know about focus in order to show how much research is still left to do even on a language as well studied as English.

Details:

Date: Friday, April 19th

Time: 3:00 - 4:30 PM

Location: FH 207

 

Posted April 18, 2013

Teachers Teaching Teachers (TTT):

Teachers Teaching Teachers

Stasis Theory

Please join us for the last Teachers Teaching Teachers event of the year. Professor Lynda Walsh will present on stasis theory, a classical system for investigating issues that can help students scaffold research projects in ENG 102 and other writing courses. We hope to see you there!

Special thanks to:
Erin Goldin & Merrilyne Lundahl
Coordinators, Core Writing

Details:

Date: Friday, April 19th

Time: 2:00 - 3:00 PM

Location: FH 233

Posted April 10, 2013

A Reading by Amaranth Borsuk

Amaranth Borsuk

Amaranth Borsuk is a poet working across media platforms. She is the author of Handiwork (Slope Editions, 2012), selected by Paul Hoover for the 2011 Slope Editions Book Prize; Tonal Saw (The Song Cave, 2010), a chapbook; and, with programmer Brad Bouse, Between Page and Screen (Siglio Press, 2012), a book of augmented-reality poems. Her intermedia project Abra, a hybrid book-performance collaboration with Kate Durbin, Ian Hatcher, and Zach Kleyn recently received an Expanded Artists' Books grant from the Center for Book and Paper Arts in Chicago and will be issued as an artist's book and iPad app in the fall of 2013.

Borsuk has a Ph.D. in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of Southern California and recently served as Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at MIT, where she taught classes in digital, visual, and material poetics. Her poems, collaborations, translations, reviews and essays have appeared widely in print and online. She currently teaches in the MFA in Creative Writing and Poetics at the University of Washington, Bothell and is at work on a critical book, The Upright Script: Modernist Mediations and Contemporary Data Poetics.

Presented as a part of The Nevada Emerging Writers Series by The Black Mountain Institute at UNLV, the UNR Department of English, and the Nevada Humanities Committee.

For further information:
Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

Details:

Date: Monday, April 15th

Time: 5:30 - 7:00PM

Location: MIKC 422
University of Nevada, Reno Campus

 

Posted March 31, 2013

Lee Herrick Reading

Lee Herrick

Lee Herrick is the author of Gardening Secrets of the Dead  (WordTech Editions, 2012) and This Many Miles from Desire  (WordTech Editions, 2007). 

His poems have been published widely, including The Bloomsbury Review, ZZYZYVA, Berkeley Poetry Review, From the Fishouse (online), Highway 99: A Literary Journey Through California's Great Central Valley, 2nd edition, The Place That Inhabits Us: Poems from the San Francisco Bay Watershed, and One for the Money: The Sentence as Poetic Form.  

He is the founding editor of In the Grove and has guest edited various projects, including The Rio Grande Review and New Truths: Writing in the 21st Century by Korean Adoptees, and his narrative essay, "What Is This Thing Called Family?" appears in university textbooks.

Herrick attended Modesto Junior College and California State University, Stanislaus, where he received his MA English with a focus in classical rhetoric.  He has traveled throughout Latin America and Asia, has given readings throughout the United States, and served for seven years on the Board of Directors of the English Council of California Two-Year Colleges. 


Born in Daejeon, South Korea, adopted at ten months old, and raised in the East Bay and Central California, Herrick now lives with his daughter and wife in Fresno, California, where he teaches at Fresno City College and in the low-residency MFA Program at Sierra Nevada College.

Details:

Date: Thursday, April 11th

Time: 6:30 - 7:30 PM

Location:The Great Room, Joe Crowley Student Union
University of Nevada, Reno Campus

 

Posted April 2, 2013

Poetry Reading:
Ann Keniston, June Saraceno, & Lindsay Wilson

Join us Wednesday, April 10 at 6:30 p.m., for an evening of poetry with Ann Keniston, Lindsay Wilson, and June Saraceno. This evening is part of Sundance Books and Music's month long celebration of National Poetry Month.

 

Ann Keniston

Ann Keniston

Ann Keniston’s poetry collection, The Caution of Human Gestures, was published in 2005 by David Robert Books; a new chapbook, November Wasps: Elegies, is forthcoming from Finishing Line Press. She is also the coeditor (with Jeffrey Gray) of The New American Poetry of Engagement: A 21st-Century Anthology (McFarland). Her poems have recently appeared or are forthcoming in Antioch Review, Interim, Tampa Review, and elsewhere. She is also a scholar of contemporary American poetry and associate professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno.

 

 

 

June Saraceno

June Saraceno

June Saraceno is author of the poetry collection Altars of Ordinary Light and a chapbook of prose poems, MeannGirl Trips. Her work has appeared in the American Journal of Nursing, California Quarterly, Pedestal, Silk Road and many other journals; as well as in several anthologies including A Bird as Black as the Sun:nCalifornia Poets on Crows and Ravens; and Intimate Kisses: The Poetry of Sexual Pleasure. She is English Program Chair at Sierra Nevada College and founding editor of the Sierra Nevada Review.

 

Lindsay Wilson

Lindsay Wilson

Lindsay Wilson, an English Professor at Truckee Meadows Community College, edits the local literary journal, The Meadow. He has published four chapbooks, and he has poems appearing in The Portland Review, Verse Daily, The Minnesota Review, Salamander, The South Dakota Review and others.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, please go to Sundance Book's Webpage.

Details:

Date: Wednesday, April 10th

Time: 6:30 - 7:30 PM

Location: Sundance Books
121 California Ave Reno, NV 89509
(775) 786-1188

Posted March 31, 2013

“Reformation in a Flood”: Three Shakespeare plays,
two religions, and one fat knight

The Core Humanities Program presents a lecture by Crowley Distinguished Professor of the Humanities James Mardock

Falstaff1

Which of these men is the cowardly, fat drunken, thieving, lecherous old “Sir John” that provides the laughs in Shakespeare’s greatest history plays? What does that question have to do with medieval and Renaissance England, and its violent history of religious reform?

Falstaff2

Come find out. Bring your own sack.

 

 

 

 

Details:

Date: Tuesday, April 9th

Time: 4:00 - 5:30 PM

Location: RSJ 101

 

Posted April 2, 2013

Reading by Kelle Groom

Congratulations to Claire Vaye Watkins for Winning the Prestigious Story Prize

"Without pretension or rancor, the author recalls her struggles after losing the son she’d had at age 19."
— Editors' Choice, New York Times Book Review

Kelle Groom's memoir, I Wore the Ocean in the Shape of a Girl (Free Press/Simon & Schuster 2011; paperback 2012), is a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers pick, New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice selection, a Library Journal Best Memoir of 2011, Barnes & Noble Best Book of the Month, Oprah.com O Magazine selection, and Oxford American Editor's Pick. Her poetry collections are Five Kingdoms (Anhinga Press 2010), Luckily (Anhinga 2006), and Underwater City (University Press of Florida 2004). Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry 2010, The New Yorker, Ploughshares, and Poetry, among others, and has been recognized in the Pushcart Prize 2010 and Best American Non-Required Reading 2007 anthologies. She is the recipient of fellowships from Black Mountain Institute, University of Nevada-Las Vegas in partnership with the Library of Congress, Djerassi Resident Artists Program, Millay Colony for the Arts, Atlantic Center for the Arts, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, American Antiquarian Society, and Ucross Foundation, as well as both a 2010 and a 2006 Florida Book Award, a State of Florida Division of Cultural Affairs grant, and Barbara Deming Memorial Fund grant. Groom is Distinguished Writer-in-Residence (2012-2013) at Sierra Nevada College, Lake Tahoe, where she is also on the faculty of the low-residency MFA Program. Former poetry editor of The Florida Review, she is now a contributing editor.

Event sponsored by the English Department's Public Occasion Committee.

For information about this reading, please contact Steve Gehrke at sgehrke@unr.edu.

Details:

Date: Monday, April 8th

Time: 6:00 - 7:30 PM

Location: The Great Room, Joe Crowley Student Union
University of Nevada, Reno Campus

Teachers Teaching Teachers (TTT):

100i/105/106 Assessment: Assignments that Work

TTT

Join us for a discussion about designing assignments that allow our students opportunities to demonstrate the kind of writing we value. Based on preliminary results from the 100i/105/106 assessment project, we will be looking at the features of assignments that correlated to higher scoring portfolios and considering the role of those features. Bring your own assignment sheets and questions with you! Snacks will be provided.

Details:

Date: Friday, April 19th

Time: 2:00-3:00 PM

Location: FH 233

Poetry Reading:
Joe Crowley, Gailmarie Pahmeier, & Roy A. ChÁvez

This evening is part of Sundance Books and Music's month long celebration of National Poetry Month.

Joe Crowley Gailmarie Pahmeier, Roy A. Chavez

 

Joe Crowley

Joe Crowley is a former professor and administrator at the University of Nevada, Reno, who writes poetry in retirement. His publications include books about the college presidency and related subjects, the centennial history of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and lately, various poems.

 

 

 

Gailmarie Pahmeier

Gailmarie Pahmeier teaches creative writing and contemporary literature courses at the University of Nevada, where she has been honored with the Alan Bible Teaching Excellence Award and the University Distinguished Teacher Award. Her work has been widely published in literary journals and anthologies. She is the author of the poetry collection The House on Breakaheart Road, two chapbooks from Black Rock Press, and Shake It and It Snows, which won the 2009 Coal Hill Chapbook Award from Autumn House Press. In 2007, she received the Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.

 

 

Roy A. ChÁvez

Born in Lima, Perú, Roy A. Chávez now lives in Carson City, Nevada where he is a mechanical designer. He is a recipient of the 2001 Nevada Arts Council Fellowship; Reflections in Motion, 2004 and the 2005 Sierra Arts Foundation Grant.

 

 

For more information, please go to Sundance Book's Webpage.

Details:

Date: Wednesday, April 3rd

Time: 6:30 - 7:30 PM

Location: Sundance Books
121 California Ave Reno, NV 89509
(775) 786-1188

 

Posted March 31, 2013

Denice Turner
Lecture

Life Legacies From the Heavenly Frontier to the Intermountain West

Denice Turner

Denice Turner discusses writing to thesis and writing to theme, making peace with the re- search trajectory and writer’s platform, shame and shameless promotion, whilst reading from her latest work, Legacies.

An educator, scholar, and creative writer, Denice Turner has taught writing for two decades and specializes in life story.  Her first book, Writing the Heavenly Frontier, celebrates the voices of America’s first aviators, while her second, Legacies, takes a narrative approach to what Brené Brown has called “an epidemic of shame.” Her work has been anthologized in Travel Writing: Critical Concepts in Literary and Cultural Studies (Routledge), Borne on Air (Eastern Washington UP), and has appeared in AOPA Pilot and Utah State University Magazine. Selections from Legacies have won the Western Literature Association’s Fredrick Man- fred Award for narrative nonfiction, and an essay formed from its final chapters was featured in the Georgetown Review as one of its national prose prize winners.

 

SPONSORED BY THE HILLIARD ENDOWMENT AND THE UNR English Department

 

Details:

Date: Monday, March 29th

Time: 4:00 - 5:00 PM

Location: Frandsen Humanities 129
University of Nevada, Reno

For further information please contact:

Professor Cheryll Glotfelty

Email: glotfelt@unr.edu

Phone: 775-682-6395

 

Posted March 15, 2013

Congratulations to Alumna Claire Vaye Watkins for Winning the Prestigious Story Prize

Congratulations to Claire Vaye Watkins for Winning the Prestigious Story Prize

Reposted from NPR's Website.

The 10 stories in Claire Vaye Watkins' debut collection — Battleborn — explore the past and present of the American West, specifically Nevada, where Watkins spent much of her childhood and adolescence. On Wednesday, it was announced that the 28-year-old author had won two major literary prizes for Battleborn: the $10,000 Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the $20,000 Story Prize. Pulitzer Prize-winner Junot Diaz (This Is How You Lose Her) and Dan Chaon (Stay Awake) were the other finalists for The Story Prize, which is the most significant award for short fiction in the U.S.

Watkins' mother and stepfather settled in Pahrump, Nev., when Watkins was 6, and, she tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies, she and her sister "spent a lot of time traipsing around naked through the desert, wandering and playing with our dogs and finding creatures and rocks. ... [My parents] taught us a lot about rocks and the desert and the natural world, and it was really sort of our playground."

(Read full article here.)

Posted March 15, 2013

Linguistics students travel to Mexico, deliver research in Spanish

Students at the University of Nevada, Reno present research at language conference in Oaxaca

Professor Lillehaugen and her students at the “Coloquio Sobre Lenguas Otomangues y Vecinas” conference in Oaxaca, Mexico. From left: Brook Lillehaugen, Ellyn Morrill, Brent Coulter, Rebecca Whistler, Cameron Rees, Allyson Stronach, Enrique Valdivia and Oanh Luc.

At the University of Nevada, Reno students have the opportunity for their education to be in many different forms, and take them to unexpected places. Allyson Stronach is one of seven University students who were given the chance to travel to Oaxaca, Mexico after taking a linguistics class with Professor Brook Lillehaugen last spring.

Professor Lillehaugen and her students at the “Coloquio Sobre Lenguas Otomangues y Vecinas” conference in Oaxaca, Mexico. From left: Brook Lillehaugen, Ellyn Morrill, Brent Coulter, Rebecca Whistler, Cameron Rees, Allyson Stronach, Enrique Valdivia and Oanh Luc.

Students learned about the Zapotec language and culture, but were also able to translate documents in the language from the 16th and 17th centuries into English. Lillehaugen, who travels often to Oaxaca, offered her students the chance to travel and participate in "Coloquio Sobre Lenguas Otomangues y Vecinas," an annual linguistics conference on Otomanguean, a large family of languages generally spoken in Mexico, and other neighboring languages. The students then presented research papers in Spanish.

Article by: Stephany Kirby

Read full piece here: http://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2013/linguistics-in-mexico

Posted March 5, 2013

Marcela Sulak
Poetry Reading

2013 National African American Read-In

Marcela Sulak is the author of two collections of poetry Immigrant (Black Lawrence Press, 2010) and the chapbook Of All The Things That Don't Exist, I Love You Best (Finishing Line Press).  Other poems have appeared or are forthcoming in such journals as  Guernica, The Black Warrior Review, The Cimarron Review, The Notre Dame Review, Fence, The Indiana Review, The Cortland Review, Quarterly West, Third Coast and No Tell Motel, among others.

 

SPONSORED BY THE HILLIARD ENDOWMENT AND THE PUBLIC OCCASION COMMITTEE

 

Details:

Date: Monday, March 4th

Time: 4:00PM

Location: Graduate Student Lounge
4th Floor
UNR Knowledge Center

For further information please contact:

Professor Steve Gehrke

SGEHRKE@UNR.EDU

Posted February 26, 2013

Renovation: Graduate Student Conference

Coake You Came Back

Dear Faculty, Staff, and Graduate Students,

The Renovation conference is here! We, the Conference Committee, are excited to invite you to attend.

The conference opens on Friday, March 1, 2013, with a roundtable from 4-5 PM, "Renovation: Transforming Our Local Community," in Davidson Math and Science 103. This session will be an opportunity to explore connections between universities and their local communities. What commitments should universities and local communities share? How are institutions working together to promote sustainability and resilience in today’s world? Sarah Lillegard (Holland Project), Monique Monteverde (River School Farm), Jeff Mitchell (Reno Bike Project), Amber Sallaberry (Great Basin Community Food Co-op), and Jessica Schneider (Junkee Clothing Exchange) will discuss how their organizations benefit Reno by providing goods and services that are often as "renovative" as they are innovative. A reception with hors d'oeuvres and beverages will follow soon after.

On Saturday, March 2, panels begin at 8:15AM and run until 3:30PM in Frandsen Humanities. Attached you will find a full schedule. There are 46 presenters from UNR, UNLV, and schools in California, Utah, and Washington. The conference's interdisciplinarity is best embodied in our panelists who represent Literature, Rhetoric, Creative Writing, Literature and the Environment, History, Sociology, French, Spanish, Education, Music, and Art. We are pleased to showcase so many young, promising scholars from around the region and from diverse intellectual traditions.

The conference concludes on Saturday with a keynote address by Dr. Alicia Barber. Her talk, "Renovating Reno: Image and Environment in the Biggest Little City," begins at 4:00pm in the Knowledge Center auditorium. Please see the attached flier for more information. A reception will follow the keynote address.

We want to thank all of you for your support and help in making this conference happen. Additionally, we would like to thank the Hilliard Endowment in the Humanities; the English Department; the Gender, Race, and Identity Program; and the Graduate Student Association for their financial support.

Please do join us this Friday and Saturday, and please invite your friends and colleagues.

Details:

Date: March 1-2 2013

Location: University of Nevada, Reno

Conference Homepage:

http://www.unr.edu/cla/engl/renovation/index.html

Conference Sechdule:

http://www.unr.edu/cla/engl/renovation/images/Conference

%20Program%20Final%20for%20Web.pdf

For further information please contact:

unr.grad.conference@gmail.com

Posted February 15, 2013

2013 National African American Read-In

2013 National African American Read-In

Come celebrate Black History Month participating in this African American Read-In. You can read from or listen to passages from your favorite black-authored books.

Details:

Date: Thursday, February 28th

Time: 4:00 - 5:30PM

Location: Back Room of Bibo on Record Street

For further information please contact:

Professor Justin Gifford
jdgifford@unr.edu
or
Diane Miniel
dminiel@unr.edu

 

Posted February 21, 2013

A Reading and Craft Talk by Leslie Jamison

Coake You Came Back

Leslie Jamison’s debut novel, The Gin Closet, published when she was just 26, earned recognition as one of the Best Books of  2010 by the San Francisco Chronicle, was named a finalist for the Los Angeles Times First Fiction Award, and garnered critical praise for its unflinching yet lyrical portrait of addiction.  Her forthcoming book, The Empathy Exams: Essays on Pain, which covers subjects from slum tourism to ultra-running, won the Graywolf Press Nonfiction Prize and will be published in the fall.

Jamison has taught courses in fiction at Wesleyan University, Yale University, and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She also mentors through the PEN Prison Writing Program.  A native of Los Angeles, Jamison has earned degrees from Harvard and the Iowa Writer’s Workshop and is pursuing a Ph.D. in literature at Yale.

 

Details:

Date: Wednesday, February 20th

Time: 4:00PM

Location: Joe Great Room

Posted February 15, 2013

PART WILD: The Beauty and Tragedy of Living with a Measure of Wildness

The New American Poetry of Engagement: 
A 21st Century Anthology

A public talk by Ceiridwen Terrill

In 1993 American scientists reclassified the dog as a subspecies of gray wolf because their mitochondrial DNA differs by no more than 0.2%. But 40,000 years or more of selection has made it possible for dogs to live with humans on human terms, whereas the survival of wolves depends upon their avoiding human contact. Part Wild is the personal story of one woman's life with Inyo, a canine both wolf and dog, a creature divided between her bond to one woman and her need to roam free. Interwoven with the story are the results of five years' investigation into the genetics and behavior of wolves and dogs.

Ceiridwen Terrill specializes in creative nonfiction, including environmental journalism, science writing, and memoir. Her essays have appeared in Slate, High Country News, BARK, and Oxford American. Her second book, Part Wild (Scribner), is a finalist for the 2013 Oregon Book Award in Creative Nonfiction. Terrill teaches field courses in botanical medicine and urban ecology, and she is a horsewoman, backpacker, and sailor. Her website is www.myurbanwild.com.

Details:

Date: Friday, January 25th

Time: 4:00PM

Location: Frandsen Hall 129

Posted January 22, 2013

Professor Coake's You came Back wins award

Coake You Came Back

Christopher Coake's new novel You Came Back, published in June 2012 by Grand Central Publishing, tells the story of Mark Fife, a Midwesterner who believes he has successfully moved past the accidental death of his young son Brendan, as well as his subsequent divorce from his college sweetheart Chloe. He's successful, he's in love again, and he believes he's mastered his own memories.

But then he is contacted by a strange woman who tells him not only that she owns his old house, but that she believes it to be haunted by Brendan's ghost. Will Mark--who does not believe in ghosts--come to accept the mounting evidence that Brendan's is real? Will his engagement to his new love Allison be threatened by the reappearance in Mark's life of Chloe--who does believe? If the ghost is real, what can these two wounded parents do to help their son?

You Came Back examines the beauty and danger of belief in all its forms--not only belief in the supernatural, but in the love that binds parents and children, husbands and wives. The novel was released to critical acclaim; it was named a Best Book of 2012 by BookPage, The San Francisco Book Review, and the Kansas City Star, and was named the November 2012 book club pick of The Times of London.

 

Posted January 22, 2013

Fall 2012

Hail and farewell to Monica Grecu

Monica Grecu

Our friend and colleague Monica Grecu is retiring at the end of this month. During her twenty-seven years at UNR, Monica has contributed enormously to our university community and touched many lives. Monica began her career here in Student Services where she offered seminars in language, writing, and test-taking skills, as well as providing academic advising and support in grant writing.

In 1995, Monica joined the English Department. Over the years, her many devoted students have found her to be a dedicated and enthusiastic teacher and an unselfish advisor. She made significant contributions to UNR's growth as a global university by fostering exchanges between UNR and Babes-Bolyai University in Cluj, Romania. As many of you know, Monica gave generously of her time and energy to this program, hosting faculty, making living -- and academic -- arrangements for them. She also served the broader community as a member of the Mayor's International Advisory Board, as a member of the Executive Board of the Nevada Faculty Alliance, as a longtime teacher in the Lifescapes and ElderCollege programs, and as President of the Phi Beta Delta ETA Chapter.

We are deeply grateful to Monica for her many years of teaching, service, and commitment. She will be very much missed by her colleagues and her students. We wish her well on this new phase of her life.

Posted December 2, 2012

The Super PAC Poets Present Poetry for the End of the Era

FEATURING: Doomsday Solar Flares, Live Music, Gangnam Style

Pimping the Presidency: Black Cultural Politics in the Age of Barack Obama and Ice Loves Coco A Lecture by Justin Gifford

Readings by:

  • Virginia Allen
  • Alexander King
  • Monique Normand
  • Jen Vineyard
  • Joe Crowley
  • Mary Nork
  • Suzie Shoemaker
  • Michael Brian Austria
  • Lucian Matthew
  • Maurice Barrientos
  • Melanie Ann Peck

Details:

Date: Tuesday, December 11th

Time: 5:30M -- 7:00PM

Location: The Great Room, Joe Crowley Student Union, UNR Campus

For further information please contact:

Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

Posted December 2, 2012

A Reading and Craft Talk
by Peter Covino

Steve Gehrke named 2013 Artist Fellow to the Nevada Arts Council

Peter Covino is the author of Straight Boyfriend, winner of the 2001 Frank O'Hara Chapbook Prize, The Right Place to Jump, and Cut Off the Ears of Winter, winner of the 2007 PEN/America Osterweil Award and finalist for both the Publishing Triangle Thom Gunn Award and the Paterson Poetry Prize.

Covino was born in Italy.  He earned an M.S. degree from Columbia School of Social Work and received his Ph.D. in English/Creative Writing at the University of Utah, where he was a Steffensen Cannon Fellow.

His poems have appeared in Colorado Review, Columbia, The Journal, The Paris Review, Verse, and The Penguin Book of Italian American Writing.

He has worked as a professional social worker in the fields of foster care, AIDS services, and youth and family services.  He currently teaches in the English Department at the University of Rhode Island.  Covino’s newer work reflects a growing concern with Italian historical influences, issues of environmental impingement, contemporary art, and visual and poetic experimentation.

The Black Mountain Institute at UNLV, the UNR Department of English, and the Nevada Humanities Committee Present The Nevada Emerging Writers Series

Details:

Date: Monday, November 26th

Time: 5:30 - 7:00 PM

Location: Great Room of the Joe Crowley Student Union.

For further information please contact:

Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

 

Posted November 22, 2012

Suzanne Roberts wins Literary Prize

Suzanne Roberts wins Literary Prize

Congratulations to Suzanne Roberts (PhD 2008), whose recent memoir, Almost Somewhere: Twenty-Eight Days on the John Muir Trail, won the 2012 National Outdoor Book Award< in the Literature category. Almost Somewhere, published this fall by the University of Nebraska Press, recounts a month-long backpacking trip that Suzanne took in 1993 with two other women friends. The intrepid trio encounter bears, bulimia, injuries, strange men, and their own fears, as Suzanne shares a woman's perspective on outdoor adventure. Suzanne Roberts is a professor of English at Lake Tahoe Community College and teaches for the low-residency MFA program at Sierra Nevada College.

Posted November 22, 2012

Congratulations to Professor Steve Gehrke named 2013 Artist Fellow to the Nevada Arts Council

Steve Gehrke named 2013 Artist Fellow to the Nevada Arts Council

Steve Gehrke has been named as one of six 2013 Artist Fellows by the Nevada Arts Council. See details here. Steve has also been a recent recipient of an NEA literature fellowship. His first book, The Resurrection Machine, received the 1999 John Ciardi Prize. His second book, The Pyramids of Malpighi, won the Philip Levine Prize for Poetry. His most recent book, Michelangelo’s Seizure (2007), was selected for the National Poetry Series. In addition, his poems have been published in dozens of periodicals such as The Kenyon Review, The Threepenny Review, The Yale Review, and Prairie Schooner.

Posted November 17, 2012

The New American Poetry of Engagement
A Poetry Reading at
Sundance Bookstore

The New American Poetry of Engagement: 
A 21st Century Anthology

The New American Poetry of Engagement:
A 21st Century Anthology

This anthology of poetry collects 21st century American works by both established and emerging poets that deal with the public events, government policies, ecological and political threats, economic uncertainties, and large- scale violence that have largely defined the century to date. But these 138 poems by 50 poets do not simply describe, lament, or bear witness to contemporary events; they also explore the linguistic, temporal, and imaginative problems involved in doing so. In this way, the anthology offers a comprehensive look at contemporary American poetry, demonstrating that poets are moving at once toward a new engagement with public concerns and toward a focus on the problems of representation. A detailed introduction by the editors along with poetics statements by many of the poets add depth and context to a book that will appeal to anyone interested in the state and evolution of contemporary American poetry.

The Editors:
Ann Keniston is an associate professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno.
Jeffrey Gray is a professor of English at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey.

Details:

Date: Thursday, November 29th

Time: 6:30 - 8:00PM

Location: Sundance Books and Music
121 California Avenue Reno, NV 89509

Posted November 13, 2012

Academic Job Placement Workshop
Topic: Telephone and MLA Interviews

Telephone

The third of the department's Academic Job Placement Workshop series takes place next Friday. All are welcome to attend. You need not have attended the first workshops to attend this one.

  • Coordinator/Moderator: Don Hardy
  • Panelist: Bill Macauley
  • Panelist: Cathy Chaput
  • Panelist: Stacy Burton

 

Details:

Date: Friday, November 16th

Time: 1:00-3:00 PM

Location: FH 129

Posted November 8, 2012

Rebecca Dunham, Poetry Reading

Rebecca Dunham

Rebecca Dunham is the author of two collections of poetry. Her first book, The Miniature Room, won the 2006 T.S. Eliot Prize and was published by Truman State University Press. Her second book, The Flight Cage, was a Tupelo Press Open Reading selection, and was published in 2010. A chapbook of poems, titled Fascicle, is just out from Dancing Girl Press in 2012.

Her other awards and honors include a 2007 NEA Fellowship, the 2005-2006 Jay C. and Ruth Halls Fellowship in Poetry at the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing, the 2011 Terrain.org Poetry Prize, and the 2005 Indiana Review Prize for Poetry. Poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Prairie Schooner, AGNI, The Kenyon Review, The Iowa Review, and FIELD. She is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Sponsored by the Hilliard Endowment

For more information, please contact Steve Gehrke.

Details:

Date: Thursday, November 15th

Time: 4:00 PM

Location:UNR Knowledge Center, graduate student lounge

Posted November 8, 2012

Dr. Kevin DeLuca: China, Social Media, and Saving The Earth; Deploying Decentered Knots of World-Making to Challenge the Global Corporatocracy

Image Politics: The New Rhetoric of Environmental Activism

A lecture by Dr. Kevin DeLuca, author of Image Politics: The New Rhetoric of Environmental Activism

The emergence of China and the advent of social media are two events that rupture the world as it is and force us to rethink everything. How do social media and smartphones transform how activists act? The social media norm of perpetual participation creates new expectations of what it means to be a citizen and a democracy. In China environmental protests enabled by social media suggest new possibilities for activism.

 

Details:

Date: Thursday, November 15th

Time: 4:00 PM

Location: Joe Crowley Student Union, room 423

Posted November 8, 2012

Professor Palwick reading from Brief Visitsat Sundance Bookstore

Brief Visits

Hi, everyone. On November 15 at 6:30, I'll be reading at Sundance Bookstore from Brief Visits, a collection of 45 sonnets, just published by Texas Review Press, about my volunteer work as a lay ER chaplain. Below is the link to Sundance's official announcement. I hope some of you will be able to attend.

For additional information, please refer to the announcment from Sundance Bookstore.

Details:

Date: Thursday, November 15th

Time: 6:30 PM

Location:Sundance Bookstore
121 California Avenue Reno, NV 89509

Posted October 2012

Congratulations to Professor Anupama Mohan on her new book: Utopia and the Village in South Asian Literatures

Professor Anupama Mohan's new book: Utopia and the Village in South Asian Literatures

Utopia and the Village in South Asian Literatures provides a searching exploration of twentieth-century literatures of the Indian subcontinent by refocusing attention on works that engage with the village and the rural as a trope. Mohan breathes new life into Michel Foucault's notion of heterotopia and continues a conversation with thinkers of utopia about the need for recuperating the utopian potential in postcolonial writings. For both the novice and the scholar, this is a book that will truly define the horizons for understanding South Asian literatures and cultures, and their broader significance within postcolonial scholarship.

"This is the important new step the field has been waiting to take." - Linda Hutcheon, University Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature, University of Toronto

“The book is spectacular in its conceptual grasp of the field, and it is possibly the only book in the last two decades to offer a radical and immensely valuable methodology for reading South Asian literature.” – Chelva Kanaganayakam, Professor, Department of English, University of Toronto

Posted October 2012

"Crrrritique”: An Investigation of the Limits of Critique and the Hermeneutics of Suspicion

Crrrritique”: 
An Investigation of the Limits of Critique and the Hermeneutics of Suspicion

By: Professor Rita Felski

The idea of critique drives much contemporary work in the humanities.  Why is critique so often held to be the most rigorous, scrupulous, and radical form of thought?  And what intellectual and imaginative possibilities does it overshadow or overrule? In this talk, Professor Felski develops a five-part definition of critique—in the hope of prompting reflection on the value and limits of critique as a scholarly method.

Rita Felski is the William R. Kenan Professor at the University of Virginia and a scholar of feminist theory, modernity and postmodernity, and cultural studies.  She is the editor of the scholarly journal New Literary History, and she is the recipient of a number of honors, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and the William Parker Riley Prize for best article in PMLA

Professor Felski is the author of a number of important books in the field of literary and critical theory, including Beyond Feminist Aesthetics: Feminist Literature and Social Change (Harvard University Press, 1989), The Gender of Modernity (Harvard University Press, 1998), and Literature After Feminism (University of Chicago Press, 2003).  Most recently, Professor Felski’s research has focused on an investigation of the aesthetic experiences of enchantment and shock, as exemplified in her manifesto Uses of Literature (Blackwell’s, 2008). 

Details:

Date: Friday, November 2nd

Time: 3:00 PM

Location: Wells Fargo Auditorium,
Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center,
Room 124

Talk sponsored by: The Department of English, in association with the Gender, Race, and Identity Program, the Hilliard Endowment in the Humanities, the Guy L. Leonard Memorial Fund in Philosophy, and the Public Occasions Committee.

Posted October 2012

Teachers Teaching Teachers (TTT):

If everything's an argument, how do I teach argument without teaching everything?

TTT

Join us on Thursday for a presentation from Bill Macauley on various models of argument and a discussion of how we teach argument in our classes. Bring your questions and insights for a lively discussion. Best,

Bill Stobb will read some of his Great Basin poems (including pieces inspired by Double Negative's land artist, Michael Heizer) and discuss how he forges poetic forms to translate emptiness into meaning.

Details:

Date: Thursday, November 1

Time: 12:00-12:50 PM

Location: MSS 227

Posted October 2012

William Stobb Absentia: Poems
-- A Reading

Abstentia Poems

In selecting William Stobb’s 2007 collection for the National Poetry Series, August Kleinzahler writes, “William Stobb has nerve, talent, and engages this madly accelerating, often nearly indecipherable world in what's called real time.  And he manages it without sacrificing emotional force.  That’s something special.”  Stobb’s subsequent publications include two 2010 chapbooks, Pointless Channel (Goss 183) and Artifact Eleven (Black Rock Press), and a second Penguin Poets volume, Absentia (2011).  Of that collection, Alison Hawthorne Deming writes: “the vitality of these poems, the necessity of their questioning, makes life feel deep and strange and satisfying.”

 Stobb lives in La Crosse, Wisconsin, and works as Associate Editor and podcast producer for the award-winning literary magazine, Conduit. His poems appear regularly in journals and zines including, American Poetry Review, Colorado Review, Denver Quarterly, and DIAGRAM. In 2011, Stobb co-wrote the hit Chicago production, Predator: The Musical, which returns to the stage in 2012.  Stobb holds an MA from the creative writing program at the University of North Dakota, and a PhD in English from the University of Nevada.

Bill Stobb will read some of his Great Basin poems (including pieces inspired by Double Negative's land artist, Michael Heizer) and discuss how he forges poetic forms to translate emptiness into meaning.

Details:

Date: Monday, October 29

Time: 4:00-5:30 PM

Location: JCSU Student Union Great Room (403)
UNR campus

Talk sponsored by: UNR English Department and Public Occasions Committee; Literature & Environment graduate emphasis.


Questions?  Cheryll Glotfelty, glotfelt@unr.edu, 682-6395

Posted October 2012

Core Writing Rreads Hardcore Writing

apple core

Wednesday, Oct. 24, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Frandsen Humanities 129 Refreshments will be provided courtesy of Core Writing and the English Department.

Readers:

  • Jamie Albright
  • Linda Kay Hardie
  • Forrest Hartman
  • Joe Hunt
  • Frank Merksamer
  • Katherine Toy Miller
  • Diane Miniel
  • Jeffrey Opfer

Details:

Date: Wednesday, October 24.

Time: 5:30-6:30 PM

Location: Frandsen Humanities 129
Room 124

 

Contact Katherine Toy Miller at ktmiller@unr.edu for any further information.

 

Posted October 2012

Professor Lynda Walsh and Alumnus Kenny Walker featured on New York Times Blog

Professor Lynda Walsh and Alumnus Kenny Walker featured on New York Times Blog

Andrew Revkin's "Dot Earth" blog features an article co-authored by Kenny Walker (L&E MA 2009, currently pursuing a PhD in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Arizona) and Professor Lynda Walsh. Terrific that the work of our graduate students and faculty is being profiled in such important venues. Congratulations Kenny and Lynda!

 

 

 

Posted September 2012

Language & Linguistics Major Allyson Stronach Accepted to deliver paper at The Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas

Language & Linguistics major Allyson Stronach Accepted to deliver paper at The Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas

Language & Linguistics major Allyson Stronach -- who presented a paper at a conference in Oaxaca, Mexico last spring and conducted research on child language acquisition at the Harvard Lab for Developmental Studies over the summer -- just had a paper accepted for the forthcoming meeting of The Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas.

 

 

 

 

Posted September 2012

Professor Jen Hill featured in
The Chronicle

"Journeys to the Ends of the Earth"

Professor Jen Hill features substantially in a recent article published on September 25 in the the Chronicle of Higher Education. The article "Journeys to the Ends of the Earth" surveys recent scholarship of polar exploration.

Posted September 2012

Historic Walking tour of Reno

Alicia Barber is Assistant Professor of History at UNR and Director of the Nevada Oral History Program.

This tour will be led by Dr. Alicia Barber, author of Reno's Big Gamble: Image and Reputation in the Biggest Little City.  Alicia Barber is Assistant Professor of History at UNR and Director of the Nevada Oral History Program.

 

Grad students, faculty, and families are welcome to join us!

 

Details:

Date: Friday, October 12

Time: 3 - 5:00 PM

Location:10 N. Virginia.

Posted September 2012

How to think about Graduate school

Mortar Board

Friday, October 12th, Professor Stacy Burton will conduct an informal seminar entitled,"How to think about graduate school." Is it right for you? How do you prepare? What do graduate admission committees look for in an applicant?

The department will provide pizza so bring yourself a beverage and learn about the process of choosing and getting into a graduate program. If you are considering graduate studies at UNR or elsewhere, you will want to attend this informative session. You are welcome to leave after the first hour or to arrive in time for the second hour’s presentation.

FIRST HALF: 11-12:00 PM

Deciding whether to go to graduate school: what kind of program to choose.

SECOND HALF: 12:00-1:00 PM

Planning wisely: when and where to apply
What is required in an application
What do graduate admissions committees look for in an applicant?

Details:

Date: Friday, October 12th

Time: 11:00- 1:00 PM

Location: FH, Room 109

Posted October 2012

Suzanne Roberts Reading

Suzanne Roberts Reading

The English Department is pleased to welcome back alumna Suzanne Roberts as she celebrates the publication of her newest book, a memoir. Her books include Almost Somewhere: Twenty-Eight Days on the John Muir Trail (University of Nebraska Press, 2012), and the poetry collections  Plotting Temporality (2012), Three Hours to Burn a Body: Poems on Travel (2011), Nothing to You (2008), and Shameless (2007). She has won numerous awards for her creative work and for her work in the classroom. Suzanne holds degrees in biology and English from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, and a doctorate in literature and the environment from the University of Nevada-Reno. She currently teaches at Lake Tahoe Community College and for the low residency MFA in creative writing at Sierra Nevada College.

 

Details:

Date: Thursday, September 27th

Time: 5:30 PM

Location: Great Room of the Joe Crowley Student Union.

Posted September 2012

Giddy Neighbors:Englishness
and the Foreign in Henry V

Giddy Neighbors:Englishness and the Foreign in Henry V

The Core Humanities Program
presents a lecture by
Crowley Distinguished Professor of the Humanities
James Mardock

In Summer 2012, when England hosted the Olympics and celebrated the Queen’s Jubilee, a new BBC film of Shakespeare’s Henry V seemed an obvious way to remind the country of what makes it great: it’s the story, after all, of England’s most heroic king winning a hopeless battle against all odds, with God, apparently, on his side. It’s stirring and patriotic stuff, even today. As Tom Hiddleston, the actor of Henry on the BBC, put it, “The words are 410 years old, the battle was 200 years before that, and we’re that same culture.”

But what does that mean? What was national character to Shakespeare? Is the us-versus-them mentality ever as simple as “us versus them”?

Details:

Date: Wednesday, September 19th

Time: 4:00 PM

Location: DMS, Room 104

Posted September 2012

A Reading and Craft Talk by
Melinda Moustakis

Iceberg Slim: Portrait of Pimp

Melinda Moustakis was born in Fairbanks, Alaska and raised in Bakersfield, California. She received her MA from UC Davis and her PhD in English and Creative Writing from Western Michigan University.

She was named a 2011 “5 Under 35” writer by the National Book Foundation and is a 2012-2013 Hodder Fellow at The Lewis Center of the Arts at Princeton University.

2011, won the Flannery O'Connor Award and the Maurice Prize. It has also been shortlisted for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Her stories have appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, Kenyon Review, New England Review, Conjunctions, Cimarron Review, American Short Fiction, and elsewhere.

Details:

Date: Wednesday, September 12th

Time: 5:30-7:00 PM

Location: Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center, Room 422

For further information please contact:

Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

Posted September 2012

Iceberg Slim: Portrait of
a Pimp

Iceberg Slim: Portrait of Pimp

Professor Justin Gifford is featured as the literary expert in the new documentary Iceberg Slim: Portrait of a Pimp.  The film — which examines the life and work of legendary African American crime writer Robert Beck (a.k.a Iceberg Slim) — will have its world premier at the Toronto Film Festival on September 8th.  Produced by Ice-T, Portrait of a Pimp draws from interviews with Chris Rock, Snoop Dogg, Quincy Jones as well as our own Dr. Gifford. It reconstructs the story of how ex-pimp Iceberg Slim transformed African American and American culture with the publication of seven underground pulp novels.

More information on the Iceberg Slim: Portrait of a Pimp can be found at http://tiff.net/filmsandschedules/tiff/2012/icebergslimportraito and
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2180016/

Justin Gifford is an assistant professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, and he currently holds the Jean Sanford Distinguished Professorship in Core Humanities.  His book about Iceberg Slim titled Pimping Fictions: African American Crime Literature and the Untold Story of Black Pulp Publishing will be published early next year.

Posted September 2012

Congratulations to Professor William J Macauley, Jr.

Building Writing Center Assessments that Matter

Congratulations to Professor William J. Macauley, Jr. on his new book Building Writing Center Assessments that Matter.

The Utah State University Press has this to say about Professor Schendel and Macauley's work:

No less than other divisions of the college or university, contemporary writing centers find themselves within a galaxy of competing questions and demands that relate to assessment—questions and demands that usually embed priorities from outside the purview of the writing center itself. Writing centers are used to certain kinds of assessment, both quantitative and qualitative, but are often unprepared to address larger institutional or societal issues. In Building Writing Center Assessments that Matter, Schendel and Macauley start from the kinds of assessment strengths already in place in writing centers, and they build a framework that can help writing centers satisfy local needs and put them in useful dialogue with the larger needs of their institutions, while staying rooted in writing assessment theory.

Posted September 2012

Congratulations, Claire

Watkins's Battleborn

Congratulations to Alum Claire Vaye Watkins whose debut book Battleborn is recieving glowing reviews. Vogue's review, for instance, had the following to say:

"Filled with ghost towns and lost souls, her debut story collection, Battleborn (Riverhead), features the most captivating voice to come out of the West since Annie Proulx and Denis Johnson—though it’s to early Joan Didion that she bears comparison for her arid humor and cut-to-the-chase knowingness." Read the full review on Vogue's website.

Posted August 2012

Congratulations, Professor Keniston

Keniston New American Poetry of Engagement

Congratulations to Professor Ann Keniston for her new anthology The New American Poetry of Engagement.

This comprehensive anthology collects poems by established and emerging 21st century American poets that deal with the public events, government policies, ecological and political threats, economic uncertainties, and large-scale violence that have largely defined the century to date. But these poems do not simply describe, lament, or bear witness to contemporary events; they also explore the linguistic, temporal, and imaginative problems involved in doing so. A detailed introduction by the editors and statements by many of the poets add depth and context to a book that will appeal to anyone interested in the evolution of contemporary American poetry.

Ann Keniston is an associate professor of English at the University of Nevada, Reno. Jeffrey Gray is a professor of English at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey.

Posted August 2012