Announcements

Dimitri Keriotis : a reading

Dimitri Keriotis For a reading

Dimitri Keriotis earned his MA in Literature and Environment at the University of Nevada Reno. While teaching part-time at Lake Tahoe Community College, he co-founded and co-directed the Tahoe Wilderness Institute. He earned an MFA in Creative Writing from CSU Chico and now teaches English at Modesto Junior College, where he co-founded and co-coordinates the High Sierra Institute.

His short fiction has been published in Beloit Fiction JournalGeorgetown ReviewFlyway, BorderSenses, and elsewhere, and he has written for Poets & Writers. In the fall of 2014, SFA Press released his debut collection of short stories, The Quiet Time.

Details:
Date: Thursday, February 12
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: MIKC 422 -- University of Nevada, Reno Campus

Sponsored by:

English Department's Public Occasions Committee

For further information:
Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

 

Posted February 05, 2015

June Saraceno For a reading generously supported by the Crowley Poetry Fund

June Saraceno For a reading generously supported by the Crowley Poetry Fund

June Saraceno is author of Altars of Ordinary Light, published by Plain View Press in 2007, and a chapbook of prose poems, Mean Girl Trips, published in 2006 by Pudding House Press. Her work, both poetry and fiction, has appeared widely in journals. Her second full-length collection of poetry, of Dirt and Tar, was recently released by Cherry Grove Collections.

She is currently English Program Chair at Sierra Nevada College, Lake Tahoe, where she is director of the popular Writers in the Woods literary speaker series and founding editor of the Sierra Nevada Review.

Details:
Date: February 26
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: MIKC 107 -- University of Nevada, Reno Campus

Sponsored by:

The English Department
Crowley Poetry Fund

For further information:
Gailmarie Pahmeier
Department of English/0098
University of Nevada
Reno, NV 89557
775-682-6387
gailmariep@unr.edu

Posted February 18, 2015

 

 

Professor Rasmussen verifies first folio of Shakespeare; set to curate 2016 British exhibit

John Price delivers talk “The Nature of Kinship”

"It was a trip of misery to myth," Eric Rasmussen said. The Foundation Professor and chair of the University of Nevada, Reno's English Department recounts his recent trip abroad, and said that the worldwide media attention and excitement of the discovery of a 17th century first folio of William Shakespeare overshadowed his initial hesitancy to visit Saint-Omer, France.

"I received a call from from a Saint-Omer librarian a week before I traveled to London for a meeting to plan the British Library exhibit in 2016 around the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death," Rasmussen explained. "I didn't want to leave London; most of these calls or inquires amount to nothing, but the Saint-Omer library also has a Gutenberg Bible. It takes someone with enough knowledge and interest to do some research, so I thought I better check it out."

It was librarians at a public library in northern France, particularly the director of the medieval and early modern collection, Rémy Cordonnier, who took interest in a book with no title page and no marks on the binding. They decided to contact Rasmussen to make the final connection.

"It was raining horribly when I traveled from England to France, then so quickly had to return to London, then the United States," Rasmussen said. "It was not a pleasant trip, but it took almost no time at all to know that I was looking at an original Shakespeare folio."

Before this discovery, it is believed that just 232 of Shakespeare's 800 first folios - some of the rarest books in the world - still exist. The first folio is recognized with preserving many of his plays since none of his original manuscripts survived.

"There are many indicators to quickly be able to authenticate a relic like this," Rasmussen continued. "From the press variant, watermarks, paper composition and binding. It's just that so many historical items get buried or lost during time that a discovery like this is magnificent."

The library staff at first assumed the coverless book was an 18th- or 19th-century facsimile or reprint. The library is preparing for a British literature exhibition in 2015 and started to examine it more closely.

"It was cataloged with a Neville ownership signature," Rasmussen said, and during a National Public Radio interview on Thanksgiving Day, he further explained, "Neville was the alias that was taken by the Scarisbrick family, a family of Catholic nobles. And we know Edward Scarisbrick, who took the name of Neville, went to Saint-Omer College after the Catholics were banned from England's universities."

Rasmussen said that the Neville name has again provoked a long-disputed argument among scholars about whether William Shakespeare may have been a secret Catholic.

In a New York Times interview, the first American outlet to break the story of the first folio discovery late last month, Rasmussen further explained the quarrel.

"People have been making some vague arguments, but now for the first time we have a connection between the Jesuit college network and Shakespeare," he said. "The links become a little more substantial when you have this paper trail."

Rasmussen believes this discovery will stoke this controversial fire for some time. He's been busy personally answering every email he's received - nearly 500 the first week after media reports hit - many with requests to authenticate a family heirloom, a task he will not entertain.

Rasmussen now refocuses his time and attention to the British Library Shakespeare exhibition, which marks the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death in April 2016. He was asked to curate the exhibit, a role he humbly and proudly accepted. He will travel to London every few months leading up to the unveiling. The exhibit will run from April through September 2016.

Rasmussen has served on the Board of Trustees of the Shakespeare Association of America, on the General Council of the Malone Society, and as General Textual Editor of the Internet Shakespeare Editions Project - one of the most visited Shakespearean websites in the world.

Rasmussen has written and edited 50 scholarly books, the majority of which are about Shakespeare. He has established himself as the world's pre-eminent expert on Shakespeare's life, writing and language. Weighing in on the recent claims about the 1602 quarto edition of Thomas Kyd's play, The Spanish Tragedy, having been partially written by Shakespeare, and then moderating a scholarly duel on the authorship of Double Falsehood, people throughout the world turn to University of Nevada, Reno English Professor Rasmussen when they want to know more about Shakespeare.

At the University, Rasmussen has successfully garnered numerous grants and fellowships; has received the University's highest award for teaching excellence, the F. Donald Tibbitts Distinguished Teacher Award; the top teaching award for the entire Nevada System of Higher Education, the Regents' Teaching Award; and was selected last year as a Foundation Professor.

 

Posted December 29, 2014

 

Manuel Gonzales: Fiction Reading

Manuel Gonzales: Fiction Reading

Manuel Gonzales is the author of THE MINIATURE WIFE AND OTHER STORIES (Riverhead) and the forthcoming novel, THE REGIONAL OFFICE IS UNDER ATTACK! (Riverhead). He graduated with a BA in English from the University of Texas in 1996 and then with an MFA in Creative Writing (Fiction) from Columbia University's School of the Arts in 2003. His fiction and nonfiction have been published in McSweeney's, Fence, Tin House, Open City, One Story, The Believer, i09.com, and various other publications. He is the recipient of the Academy of Arts and Letters Sue Kaufman Price for First Fiction and the Binghamton University John Gardner Prize for Fiction. For four years he ran the nonprofit writing and tutoring center for kids, Austin Bat Cave, and in times past he co-owned The Clarksville Pie Company in Austin, TX, where he baked pies for a living.

“Delightful freakishness.”
—Susannah Meadows, The New York Times

“The stories are written so believably, they handle the strange and surreal so carefully, that you want to believe the impossible is possible.” —Roxane Gay, Tin House

Details:
Date: February 18th
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Location: Graduate Reading Room, Fourth Floor, Knowledge Center

Sponsored by:

The Black Mountain Institute of UNLV

The UNR English Department

Nevada Humanities


 

Posted February 18, 2015

Fifth Annual UNR College of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Symposium (CLAGS)

Fifth Annual UNR College of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Symposium (CLAGS)

Reno, Nevada – February 18, 2015 – The fifth Annual UNR College of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Symposium (CLAGS) offers a window into the cutting edge of academic research regarding what is means to be human. This year’s theme is Constructing Humanity.

CLAGS is an interdisciplinary conference designed to increase dialogue and knowledge across, but not limited to, the liberal arts and between institutions, offering participants an opportunity to broaden academic research and develop professional relationships.
This year’s event includes 115 presenters in 35 disciplines from 40 universities. There are 37 panels, 2 visual artists, 2 musical performances, a poet, and a documentary film.

CLAGS will be held on February 26-28, 2015 at the University of Nevada, Reno in the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center’s at 1664 N. Virginia Street. CLAGS begins at 1pm on Thursday, February 26 and runs until 6pm on Saturday, February 28.

CLAGS is proud to announce a keynote talk and public lecture by Dr. Eric Lott on Saturday, February 28 at 5PM in the Wells Fargo Arena MIKC 124. Dr. Lott is a cultural historian and Professor of English at the Graduate Center – CUNY. He is also a committee member in the American Studies Association, co-director of the Future of American Studies Institute, and an editorial board member of Criticism. He is the author of Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class (1993), The Disappearing Liberal Intellectual (2006), and the forthcoming Black Mirror: the Cultural Contradictions of American Racism. Dr. Lott will also attend a brown bag talk on Friday, February 27 at 12:30PM in the Leonard Reading Room MIKC 422. Lunch will be provided.

CLAGS is free and open to the public thanks to the generous support of the College of Liberal Arts Hilliard Endowment, the English Department’s Public Occasions Committee, the Graduate Student Association, and several departments including the Gender, Race and Identity Program, Political Science, the Center for Basque Studies, Philosophy and History.

Additional information can be found here: <https://clags2015.wordpress.com>


Schedule:
Date: February 26 @1pm - February 28 @ 6pm
Location: University of Nevada, Reno in the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center’s
at 1664 N. Virginia Street.

 

Posted February 18, 2015

Gailmarie Pahmeier Appointed Reno Poet Laureate

Gailmarie Pahmeier Appointed Reno Poet Laureate

At its first meeting of 2015, the Reno City Council unanimously approved the appointment of UNR English Professor Gailmarie Pahmeier as the first Poet Laureate for the City of Reno. Reno is the first jurisdiction in the State of Nevada to have a Poet Laureate. According to the position description, "the Poet Laureate will present and advance poetry in the public domain and participate in at least four public forums and/or educational settings each year during her two-year term." A 30-year resident of Nevada, Pahmeier has published five books and chapbooks, including most recently The Rural Lives of Nice Girls (Black Rock Press, 2014). She has won many local, regional, and national awards for her writing, been a visiting writer and poet-in-residence at many schools and writing programs across the country, and published poems in dozens of journals and collections.

 

Posted January 14, 2015

Event Calendar

Additional Items of Interest

English Department Clubs

UNR Linguistics Club

The English Department helps to support several clubs for UNR's students. Please click on the images above to learn more about each club.

Internships Available

Student Studying

Internships for credit available to qualified junior and senior undergraduate English majors and minors. See a list of available positions here. Contact English Department Internship Coordinator Gailmarie Pahmeier for more information.

University Writing Center

Student Studying

Funded by student fees under the ASUN-initiated and student-approved Joint Vision 2017

Plan, the University Writing Center provides free one-on-one tutoring for undergraduate and graduate students. UWC staff is also available to give presentations to classes, faculty, and other groups.

Past Announcements

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