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Marjorie Matocq, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Contact Information

  • Email: mmatocq@cabnr.unr.edu
  • Phone: (775) 784-4621
  • Fax: (775) 784-4583
  • Office: Knudtsen Resource Center 120
  • Mail Stop: 0186

Degrees

  • Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2000
  • M.S., San Francisco State University, California, 1996
  • B.S., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, 1992

Biography

Projects in our lab focus on studying patterns of geographic population genetic structure and the processes underlying such patterns. Because the current geographic distribution of genetic diversity is determined by a complex interplay of ecology, demography, and population history, our studies are performed at various spatial and temporal scales. To study the processes underlying patterns of genetic diversity and subdivision, we combine modern molecular genetic techniques with morphological and field studies.

My research program is focused on a number of ecological and evolutionary questions at the interface of intra- and interspecific processes. My research program is heavily collections-based and integrates traditional field and morphological data with molecular and genomic methods to elucidate pattern and process at several spatial and temporal scales. The majority of my work continues to focus on members of the Neotoma fuscipes species complex.

Publications

  • Inman, R., Esque, T., Nussear, K., Leitner, P., Matocq, M., Weisberg, P., Dilts, T., Vandergast, A 2013, Is there room for all of us? Renewable energy and Xerospermophilus mohavensis., Endangered Species Research Vol. 20: 1-18, 2013 Read More...
  • Matocq, M., Kelly, P., Phillips, S., Maldonado, J. 2012, Reconstructing the evolutionary history of an endangered subspecies across the changing landscape of the Great Central Valley of California., Molecular Evolution 2012 Dec;21(24):5918-33.
  • Hornsby, A., Matocq, M. 2011, Differential regional response of the bushy-tailed woodrat (Neotoma cinerea) to late Quaternary climate change, Journal of Biogeography
    Bell, K., Matocq, M. 2011, Regional genetic subdivision in the Mohave ground squirrel: evidence of historic isolation and ongoing connectivity in a Mojave Desert endemic, Animal Conservation, Volume 14, Issue 4, pages 371-381 Read More...
  • Bell, K. and M.D. Matocq 2010, Development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the Mohave ground squirrel (Xerospermophilus mohavensis), Conservation Genetics Resources, DOI 10.1007/s12686-010-9229-y Read More...
  • Bell, K., D. Hafner, P. Leitner, and M.D. Matocq 2010, Phylogeography of the ground squirrel subgenus Xerospermophilus and assembly of the Mojave Desert biota., Journal of Biogeography, 37: 363-378 Read More...
  • M.D. Matocq 2009, A microarray's view of life in the desert: adding a powerful genomics tool to the woodrat's midden., Molecular Ecology, 18: 2310-2312. Read More...
  • Piaggio, A.J., K.E. Miller*, M.D. Matocq and S.L. Perkins 2009, Eight polymorphic loci developed and characterized from Townsend's big-eared bat, Corynorhinus townsendii., Molecular Ecology Resources, 9: 258-260 Read More...
  • Runck, A.M., M.D. Matocq, and J.A. Cook 2009, Historic hybridization and persistence of a novel mito-nuclear combination in red-backed voles (Genus Myodes)., BMC Evolutionary Biology, 9: 114. Read More...
  • M.D. Matocq and P.J. Murphy 2007, Fine-scale phenotypic change across a species transition zone in the genus Neotoma: disentangling independent evolution from phylogenetic history., Evolution 61: 2544-2557. Read More...
  • M.D. Matocq, C.R. Feldman, and Q. Shurtliff 2007, Phylogenetic relationships of the woodrat genus Neotoma (Rodentia: Muridae): implications for the evolution of phenotypic variation in male external genitalia., Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 42: 637-652. Read More...
  • Spear, S.S., C.R. Peterson, M.D. Matocq, and A. Storfer 2006, Molecular evidence for historical and recent population size reductions of tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum) in Yellowstone National Park., Conservation Genetics 7: 605-611 Read More...
  • Spear, S.S., C.R. Peterson, M.D. Matocq, and A. Storfer. 2005, Landscape genetics of the blotched tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum melanostictum)., Molecular Ecology 14: 2553-2564. Read More...
  • Matocq, M.D. and E.A. Lacey. 2004, Philopatry, kin clusters, and genetic relatedness in a population of woodrats (Neotoma macrotis)., Behavioral Ecology 15: 647-653. Read More...
  • Matocq, M.D. 2004, Reproductive success and effective population size in woodrats (Neotoma macrotis)., Molecular Ecology 13: 1635-1642. Read More...
  • Matocq, M.D. 2002, Morphological and molecular analysis of a contact zone in the Neotoma fuscipes species complex., Journal of Mammalogy 83: 866-883. Read More...
  • Matocq, M.D. 2002, Phylogeographical and regional history of the dusky-footed woodrat, Neotoma fuscipes ., Molecular Ecology 11: 229-242.
  • Matocq, M.D. 2001, Characterization of microsatellite loci in the dusky-footed woodrat, Neotoma fuscipes., Molecular Ecology Notes 1: 194-196.
  • Matocq, M.D. and F.X. Villablanca. 2001, Genetic diversity in an endangered species: recent or historic pattern?, Biological Conservation 98: 61-68. Read More...
  • Smith, F.A., M.D. Matocq, K.F. Melendez, A.M. Ditto, and P. Kelly. 2000, How isolated are Pleistocene refugia? Results from a study on a relict woodrat population from the Mojave Desert, California., Journal of Biogeography 27: 483-500. Read More...
  • Matocq, M.D., M.N.F. da Silva, and J.L. Patton. 2000, Population genetic structure of two ecologically distinct Amazonian spiny rats: separating history and current ecology., Evolution 54: 1423-1432
  • Lacey , E., J. Maldonado, J. Clabaugh, and M.D. Matocq. 1999, Microsatellites isolated from tuco-tucos (Ctenomys sp.)., Molecular Ecology 8: 1754-1756.
  • Randall, J.A. and M.D. Matocq. 1997, Why do kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) foot drum at snakes?, Behavioral Ecology 8: 404-413. Read More...
  • Garcia-Moreno, J., M.D. Matocq, M. Roy, E. Geffen, and R.K. Wayne. 1996, Relationships and genetic purity of the endangered Mexican Wolf based on analysis of microsatellite loci., Conservation Biology 10: 376-389. Read More...

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