Skip Site Navigation
Skip To Page Content

AACSB Accredited

AACSB Logo

The College of Business is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.

Get Our Newsletter

 

Find out what's going on at the College with our newsletter. More info here.

Contact Information

College of Business

Phone(775) 784-4912
Fax(775) 784-1773
Location Ansari Business Building
409
Address 1664 N. Virginia Street
Reno,  NV  89557-0024
Contact Contact Us

2008 Economics Research Working Papers

  • Ambiguity, Pessimism, and Religious Choice [pdf]
    Authors: Melkonyan, T. and Pingle, M. Abstract: Using a relatively mild restriction on the beliefs of the MMEU−preference functional, in which the decision maker’s degree of ambiguity and degree of pessimism are each parameterized, we present a rather general theory of religious choice in the decision theory tradition, one that can resolve dilemmas, address the many Gods objection, and address the inherent ambiguity. Using comparative static analysis, we are able to show how changes in either the degree of ambiguity or the degree of pessimism can lead a decision maker to “convert” from one religion to another. We illustrate the theory of religious choice using an example where the decision maker perceives three possible religious alternatives.
  • Ambiguity, Pessimism, and Religious Choice [pdf]
    Authors: Melkonyan, T. and Pingle, M. Abstract: Using a relatively mild restriction on the beliefs of the MMEU−preference functional, in which the decision maker’s degree of ambiguity and degree of pessimism are each parameterized, we present a rather general theory of religious choice in the decision theory tradition, one that can resolve dilemmas, address the many Gods objection, and address the inherent ambiguity. Using comparative static analysis, we are able to show how changes in either the degree of ambiguity or the degree of pessimism can lead a decision maker to “convert” from one religion to another. We illustrate the theory of religious choice using an example where the decision maker perceives three possible religious alternatives.
  • Further Analysis of the Zipf Law: Does the Rank-Size Rule Really Exist? [pdf]
    Authors: Nota, F. and Song, S. Abstract: The widely-used Zipf law has two striking regularities: excellent fit and close-to-one exponent. When the exponent equals to one, the Zipf law collapses into the rank-size rule. This paper further analyzes the Zipf exponent. By changing the sample size, the truncation point, and the mix of cities in the sample, we found that the exponent is close to one only for some selected sub-samples. Using the values of estimated exponent from the rolling sample method, we obtained an elasticity of the exponent with respect to sample size.
  • Further Analysis of the Zipf Law: Does the Rank-Size Rule Really Exist? [pdf]
    Authors: Nota, F. and Song, S. Abstract: The widely-used Zipf law has two striking regularities: excellent fit and close-to-one exponent. When the exponent equals to one, the Zipf law collapses into the rank-size rule. This paper further analyzes the Zipf exponent. By changing the sample size, the truncation point, and the mix of cities in the sample, we found that the exponent is close to one only for some selected sub-samples. Using the values of estimated exponent from the rolling sample method, we obtained an elasticity of the exponent with respect to sample size.
  • Industrial Upgrade, Employment Shock and Land Centralization in China [pdf]
    Authors: Song, S., Wang, C. and Zheng, J. Abstract: This paper investigates the relationships among industrial upgrading, mid-aged peasants’ non-farm employment, and land conversion systems. We prove that China’s efforts to upgrade its industries generate a negative employment shock on mid-aged peasant workers, forcing some of them to return to their home villages. The current lump-sum land acquisition system, however, will neither help peasant workers deal with the adverse employment shock nor promote land centralization for industrial and urban uses. On contrary, land cooperation, an emerging land centralization system, will help peasant workers mitigate the adverse employment shock and centralize rural land for nonagricultural purposes.
  • Industrial Upgrade, Employment Shock and Land Centralization in China [pdf]
    Authors: Song, S., Wang, C. and Zheng, J. Abstract: This paper investigates the relationships among industrial upgrading, mid-aged peasants’ non-farm employment, and land conversion systems. We prove that China’s efforts to upgrade its industries generate a negative employment shock on mid-aged peasant workers, forcing some of them to return to their home villages. The current lump-sum land acquisition system, however, will neither help peasant workers deal with the adverse employment shock nor promote land centralization for industrial and urban uses. On contrary, land cooperation, an emerging land centralization system, will help peasant workers mitigate the adverse employment shock and centralize rural land for nonagricultural purposes.
  • Paradoxes of Traffic Flow and Economics of Congestion Pricing [pdf]
    Authors: Ding, C., Song, S. and Zhang, Y. Abstract: This paper utilizes a unique county-level dataset to examine technical efficiency and technology gap in China’s agriculture. We classify the counties into four regions with distinctive levels of economic development, and hence production technologies. A meta-frontier analysis is applied to the counties. We find that although the eastern counties have the highest efficiency scores with respect to the regional frontier but the northeastern region leads in terms of agricultural production technology nationwide. Meanwhile, the mean efficiency of the northeastern counties is particularly low, suggesting technology and knowledge diffusion within region might help to improve production efficiency and thus output.
  • Paradoxes of Traffic Flow and Economics of Congestion Pricing [pdf]
    Authors: Ding, C., Song, S. and Zhang, Y. Abstract: This paper utilizes a unique county-level dataset to examine technical efficiency and technology gap in China’s agriculture. We classify the counties into four regions with distinctive levels of economic development, and hence production technologies. A meta-frontier analysis is applied to the counties. We find that although the eastern counties have the highest efficiency scores with respect to the regional frontier but the northeastern region leads in terms of agricultural production technology nationwide. Meanwhile, the mean efficiency of the northeastern counties is particularly low, suggesting technology and knowledge diffusion within region might help to improve production efficiency and thus output.
  • Private Money as a Competing Medium of Exchange [pdf]
    Authors: Pingle M. and Mukhopadhyay, S. Abstract: Using a relatively mild restriction on the beliefs of the MMEU−preference functional, in which the decision maker’s degree of ambiguity and degree of pessimism are each parameterized, we present a rather general theory of religious choice in the decision theory tradition, one that can resolve dilemmas, address the many Gods objection, and address the inherent ambiguity. Using comparative static analysis, we are able to show how changes in either the degree of ambiguity or the degree of pessimism can lead a decision maker to “convert” from one religion to another. We illustrate the theory of religious choice using an example where the decision maker perceives three possible religious alternatives.
  • Private Money as a Competing Medium of Exchange [pdf]
    Authors: Pingle M. and Mukhopadhyay, S. Abstract: Using a relatively mild restriction on the beliefs of the MMEU−preference functional, in which the decision maker’s degree of ambiguity and degree of pessimism are each parameterized, we present a rather general theory of religious choice in the decision theory tradition, one that can resolve dilemmas, address the many Gods objection, and address the inherent ambiguity. Using comparative static analysis, we are able to show how changes in either the degree of ambiguity or the degree of pessimism can lead a decision maker to “convert” from one religion to another. We illustrate the theory of religious choice using an example where the decision maker perceives three possible religious alternatives.
  • Religion and Faith: A Decision Theory Perspective [pdf]
    Authors: Melkonyan, T. and Pingle, M. Abstract: We examine the implications of decision theory for religious choice and evangelism, under the assumption that people choose their religion. The application of decision theory leads us to a broad definition of religion and a particular definition of faith, each related to the uncertainty associated with what happens to a person after death. We examine two extremes: total ambiguity and no ambiguity. For total ambiguity, we show there is “designer religion,” which is a religion that will capture all decision makers applying any one of the standard decision criteria. For no ambiguity, we characterize when a decision maker will find new religious information more valuable and we characterize a “miracle” in a specific way.
  • Religion and Faith: A Decision Theory Perspective [pdf]
    Authors: Melkonyan, T. and Pingle, M. Abstract: We examine the implications of decision theory for religious choice and evangelism, under the assumption that people choose their religion. The application of decision theory leads us to a broad definition of religion and a particular definition of faith, each related to the uncertainty associated with what happens to a person after death. We examine two extremes: total ambiguity and no ambiguity. For total ambiguity, we show there is “designer religion,” which is a religion that will capture all decision makers applying any one of the standard decision criteria. For no ambiguity, we characterize when a decision maker will find new religious information more valuable and we characterize a “miracle” in a specific way.
  • Studying Economic Growth: An Avenue for Enhancing Student Empirical Skills [pdf]
    Authors: Pingle M. and Sipic, T. Abstract: The study of economic growth provides an opportunity for students to exercise their empirical skills, reinforcing the tool building that occurs in statistics and math courses. Descriptive analysis allows lower level students to develop their ability to work with data as they examine how fast the economy has grown, ascertain the regularity versus irregularity of this growth, test whether the U.S. economy is slowing down, and perform simple extrapolation forecasts. Explanatory analysis allows higher level students in macro and econometric courses to see how theory and empirics can complement each other, and see why econometric issues matter, as they seek estimates for parameters consistent with the theory. The activities presented here may be of interest to those seeking to enhance the teaching of analytical skills “across the curriculum.”
  • Studying Economic Growth: An Avenue for Enhancing Student Empirical Skills [pdf]
    Authors: Pingle M. and Sipic, T. Abstract: The study of economic growth provides an opportunity for students to exercise their empirical skills, reinforcing the tool building that occurs in statistics and math courses. Descriptive analysis allows lower level students to develop their ability to work with data as they examine how fast the economy has grown, ascertain the regularity versus irregularity of this growth, test whether the U.S. economy is slowing down, and perform simple extrapolation forecasts. Explanatory analysis allows higher level students in macro and econometric courses to see how theory and empirics can complement each other, and see why econometric issues matter, as they seek estimates for parameters consistent with the theory. The activities presented here may be of interest to those seeking to enhance the teaching of analytical skills “across the curriculum.”

You can also download Accessibility Tools and Helper Applications to open these files.

University Block N Logo

University of Nevada, Reno

University of Nevada, Reno
1664 N. Virginia Street
Reno,  NV  89557-

(775) 784-1110
Website Help
Contact Us

Copyright
Privacy
Accessibility Tools

Emergency Information
Emergency Alerts
Doing business with us